hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 747 total hits in 124 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
The equipment was lamentably defective for field-service; and our transportation, hastily impressed in the country, was deficient in quantity and very inferior in quality. With all these drawbacks, the troops marched late on the afternoon of the 3d, a day later than intended, in high spirits, and eager for the combat. A very dear friend, who commanded a brigade in the battle, wrote as follows, in 1872, to the author: You know I was as ignorant of the military art at that time as it nvalid. Contrary to his opinion of its possibility, the Federals were surprised, and they were not intrenched; and whatever disparity of military experience in the two armies existed on the evening of the 5th had also existed on the morning of the 3d, before they left Corinth. Indeed, it was a mere assumption that the enemy were on their guard and intrenched, as there was not the slightest evidence to that effect, and all the indications were to the contrary. To conclude that they were prepar
Monterey. This road proved so narrow and bad that the head of Bragg's column did not reach Monterey until 11 A. M. on the 4th, but bivouacked that night near Mickey's, in rear of Hardee's corps, with a proper interval. The First Corps, commandeexcept ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish. Luke XIII. 1. The clouds had been sending down their showers on the 4th, to the great annoyance and detention of the moving columns. But, after midnight, they gathered for a great outburst uponvents of these days, let us recur briefly to General Johnston's personal movements. He left Corinth on the morning of the 4th, and arrived at Monterey at 1 P. M. Soon after, Clanton's Alabama Cavalry brought in some Federal prisoners; and it was maSmith, and Major Ricker, who went to the front to look for enemies, instead of going to the landing ... On Friday, the 4th, nor officer, nor soldier, looked for an attack, as I can prove. . . . For weeks and months we had heard all sorts of repo
ver, effect its junction with the other corps until late Saturday afternoon, the 5th, owing to the rains on Friday and Saturday, the storm of Friday night, and otherto march at three o'clock in the morning, so as to attack the enemy early on the 5th. So far as human knowledge can reach, if this order could have been carried outondition of the cartridges. General Johnston, as he rode along the lines on the 5th, tried to prevent the recurrence of this. Bragg alludes to it with great severias to deploy into line on the field. All this was to be done by 7 A. 3m. on the 5th, and the battle to begin at eight. General Johnston and staff arrived on the fieor the use of the writer of this memoir, says: During the afternoon of the 5th, as the last of our troops were taking position, a casual and partly-accidental believe them aware of the presence of the Confederate army in their front on the 5th. Else why was General Lew Wallace with 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and N
ing then dispersed upon an invitation of the commanding general to meet at his tent that evening. At that meeting a further discussion elicited the same views, and the same firm, decided determination. The next morning, about dawn of day, the 6th, as the troops were being put in motion, several generals again met at the camp-fire of the general-in-chief. The discussion was renewed, General Beauregard again expressing his dissent; when, rapid firing in the front indicating that the attack The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north bank of the river. Crittenden's division arrived there on the morning of the 6th, and the other divisions of Buell's army followed at intervals of about six miles. The arrangement of Grant's army at Shiloh has been subjected to very severe and probably just criticism, by Federal writers, because he did not so place his tro
spection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his Life of Forrest he makes it 39,630. Hodge, in his sketch of the First Kentucky Brigade, with a different distribution of troops, puts the total at 39,695, which he says he made up from the returns at the time. Beauregard's report of the battle gives the field return at 40,335, of which 4,382 was cavalry. This last return includes Colonel Hill's Forty-seventh Tennessee Regiment, which came up on the 7th. There are apparently some errors in the return of July, 1862. The writer believes that the figures in Jordan's Life of Forrest approach the truth most nearly. It now behooves us to consider the employment of the Federal army during those fateful first days of April, when the Confederates were gathering in its front. Premising that General Grant kept his headquarters at Savannah, nine miles from Pittsburg by water and six or seven by land, and left a large discretion in the hands of G
Chapter 33: before the battle. General Johnston's prediction. anticipation of battle. strength of Federal position. Beauregard's report. Bragg's sketch of preliminaries. the resolve to attack. its origin. General Lee's letter. preparations. attempt to employ negroes. General Johnston's telegram. orders of March. enthusiasm of troops.--the army marches. field-map. distribution of arms. bad roads. skirmish on April 4th. explanation of orders. providential storm. under arms. reckless fusillade. careless pickets. first line of battle. personal movements of General Johnston. morning of the 5th. this is not War! delay. its causes. rawness of the army. a majestic presence. encouraging the troops. address to army. the Council of War. Beauregard for retreat. Johnston's decision, and reasons. Confederate array. Sherman's theory. reconnaissance. false security. was it a surprise? Federal array. the opponents. On Thursday morning, April 3d,
from the returns at the time. Beauregard's report of the battle gives the field return at 40,335, of which 4,382 was cavalry. This last return includes Colonel Hill's Forty-seventh Tennessee Regiment, which came up on the 7th. There are apparently some errors in the return of July, 1862. The writer believes that the figures in Jordan's Life of Forrest approach the truth most nearly. It now behooves us to consider the employment of the Federal army during those fateful first days of April, when the Confederates were gathering in its front. Premising that General Grant kept his headquarters at Savannah, nine miles from Pittsburg by water and six or seven by land, and left a large discretion in the hands of General Sherman, as his friend and most experienced officer, we must turn to the Memoirs of General Sherman to arrive at his theory of the battle, and his account of the events preceding it. He is entitled to this consideration, since, by his position in the advance, and by
the events preceding it. He is entitled to this consideration, since, by his position in the advance, and by the special confidence reposed in him by Grant, he shared with his chief the responsibility for whatever was done or left undone at Shiloh. We have already seen his opinion on the natural strength of the position, and the reasons he gives for not adding to it. The following is his account of the transactions ushering in the battle ( Memoirs, vol. i., p. 229): From about the 1st of April we were conscious that the rebel cavalry in our front was getting bolder and more saucy; and on Friday, the 4th of April, it dashed down and carried off one of our picket-guards, composed of an officer and seven men, posted a couple of miles out on the Corinth road. Colonel Buckland sent a company to its relief, then followed himself with a regiment, and, fearing lest he might be worsted, I called out his whole brigade and followed some four or five miles, when the cavalry in advance enc
's theory. reconnaissance. false security. was it a surprise? Federal array. the opponents. On Thursday morning, April 3d, at about one o'clock, preliminary orders were issued to hold the troops in readiness to move at a moment's notice, withs three brigades — a division, in fact, but by courtesy a reserve corps-having received their orders on the afternoon of April 3d, E. P. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, p. 87. moved from Burnsville on April 4th, at 3 A. M., by wa made in July, 1862, to the writer, then on inspection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his Life of Forrest he makes it 39,630. Hodge, in his sketch of the First Kentucky Brigade, with a different distr that Grant was surprised at Shiloh, but the evidence to the contrary is incontrovertible. The preliminary fighting of the 3d and 4th of April necessarily put division and army commanders on the alert. The evidence he cites for this is as follow
ches. field-map. distribution of arms. bad roads. skirmish on April 4th. explanation of orders. providential storm. under arms. recklry of the first Kentucky brigade, p. 87. moved from Burnsville on April 4th, at 3 A. M., by way of Farmington, toward Monterey, fourteen miles. There is a letter from General Bragg, written at 10 A. M., April 4th, addressed to General Johnston or General Beauregard, from Monterour guns, and fire low. During the intervals of the march on the 4th and 5th of April, while the men stood on their arms, the following a our front was getting bolder and more saucy; and on Friday, the 4th of April, it dashed down and carried off one of our picket-guards, compos, and I supposed the guns that opened on us on the evening of Friday, April 4th, belonged to the cavalry that was hovering along our whole frary is incontrovertible. The preliminary fighting of the 3d and 4th of April necessarily put division and army commanders on the alert. T
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...