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Generals Chalmers (search for this): chapter 37
e — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General BraChalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong,
Nathaniel Wickliffe (search for this): chapter 37
gns of impatience. I was again sent back to know of Bragg why the column on his left was not yet in position. I received identically the same answer he had given earlier in the morning. At last half-past 12 o'clock came, and no appearance of the missing column, nor any report from Bragg. General Johnston, looking first at his watch, then glancing at the position of the sun, exclaimed, This is perfectly puerile! This is not war!-Let us have our horses. He, Major Albert Smith, Captain Nathaniel Wickliffe, and myself, rode to the rear until we found the missing column standing stock-still, with its head some distance out in an open field. General Polk's reserves were ahead of it, with their wagons and artillery blocking up the road. General Johnston ordered them to clear the road, and the missing column to move forward. There was much chaffering among those implicated as to who should bear the blame. It was charged on General Polk; but the plucky old bishop unhorsed his accuser
bout eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give support, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken by Morgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, w
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 37
s' interval, and form a second line of battle. Polk's corps was to form the left wing of the third and Breckinridge's reserve the right wing. Polk's other division, under Cheatham, was on outposuggles's division did not come up promptly, and Polk's corps was held motionless by its delay. Hs head some distance out in an open field. General Polk's reserves were ahead of it, with their wago should bear the blame. It was charged on General Polk; but the plucky old bishop unhorsed his accvance.. I will send a courier to notify General Polk of my change.... By the first division hips and difficulties of this kind of service. Polk's corps was at this time superior to the others reserve was composed of the First Corps, under Polk, and three brigades under Breckinridge. Polk'sPolk's command was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on thpport, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery[12 more...]
Daniel S. Donelson (search for this): chapter 37
that heralded across the Aegean the victory of Plataea to the combatants of Mycale. Known facts, inference and imagination, often construct in an army an hypothesis not to be neglected. Possibly upon some such basis General Prentiss acted in throwing to the front ten companies, under Colonel Moore, to watch the approaches to his position. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sherman considered themselves above such idle fears. The vulgar apprehension did not touch the victor of Donelson. It never reached either Grant or Sherman. Indeed, the latter, with bitter innuendo, points to it as proof of cowardice in certain officers with whom he was at variance. He swears in his evidence on Worthington's trial. Sherman's historical raid, by Boynton, p. 29. Therefore, on Friday, two days before the battle, when Colonel Worthington was so apprehensive, I knew there was no hostile party in six miles, Hardee was not more than two miles distant. though there was reason to e
t a thunderbolt from a clear sky could not have astonished them more than the boom of artillery on Sunday morning. In Badeau's Life of Grant (page 600) occurs the following correspondence. The first communication is a telegram from General Grantnot apprehend anything like an attack upon our position. Sherman. To General Grant. In view of these quotations from Badeau's book, argument would seem entirely unnecessary in order to show that there was scarcely the faintest idea of an attack Confederate movement in force. Grant and Sherman evidently expected some skirmishing on outposts, but nothing more. General Badeau's commentaries on his own text are really amusing. He dwells on Grant's letters, quoted above, which, however, speakhad his horses saddled, to be ready in case of an attack. These are not the indications of a camp that is surprised. Badeau indulges somewhat oracularly in a piece of special pleading, very wonderful in view of the facts. He says: Private
on us. General Sherman said it could not be possible, Beauregard was not such a fool as to leave his base of operations and attack us in ours — mere reconnaissance in force. General Buell says that, so far as preparation for battle is concerned, no army could well have been taken more by surprise than was the Army, of the Tennessee on the 6th of April. Buell's letter, dated January 19, 1865, to United States service Magazine, republished in the New York World, February 29, 1865. Van Horne's Army of the Cumberland, to which General Sherman's special advocate, Mr. Moulton, refers the reader, for a fair and full history of this battle, has the following (page 105): While the national army was unprepared for battle, and unexpectant of such an event, and was passing the night of the 5th in fancied security, Johnston's army of 40,000 men was in close proximity, and ready for the bloody revelation of its presence and purpose on the following morning. General Johnston was al
E. P. Thompson (search for this): chapter 37
n, and took position, as the left wing of Polk's corps, as early as some other divisions whose presence was necessary to the attack. These movements were construed by General Lew Wallace as a reconnaissance in force against his own division at Crump's Landing, and held him in check during the 5th and the 6th, the first day of the battle. Breckinridge's three brigades — a division, in fact, but by courtesy a reserve corps-having received their orders on the afternoon of April 3d, E. P. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, p. 87. moved from Burnsville on April 4th, at 3 A. M., by way of Farmington, toward Monterey, fourteen miles distant. Some Enfield rifles, with accoutrements and ammunition, just received, were distributed about nightfall to supply deficiencies, and rations were prepared during the night. Ibid. The road was even worse than those from Corinth. The corps struggled painfully on, with poor progress. After a hard day's march, it bivouacked on
R. G. Shaver (search for this): chapter 37
l joined him. This was the purpose, this was the plan of the battle of Shiloh. When night fell, on the eve of battle, the following was the Confederate array: The front line, composed of the Third Corps and Gladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over three miles. Cleburne's brigade was on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, composed of Wood's brigade, and his own under Colonel Shaver. These occupied the centre. The interval, on his right, to Lick Creek, was occupied by Gladden's brigade, detached from Bragg, and put under Hardee's command for the battle. Hardee's three brigades numbered 6,789 effectives, and Gladden added 2,235 more — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bar
A. P. Stewart (search for this): chapter 37
key's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Bark road, at an interval of about eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give support, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day.
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