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James McDowell (search for this): chapter 37
fore, on Friday, two days before the battle, when Colonel Worthington was so apprehensive, I knew there was no hostile party in six miles, Hardee was not more than two miles distant. though there was reason to expect an attack. I suppose Colonel McDowell and myself had become tired of his constant prognostications, and paid no attention to him, especially when we were positively informed by men like Buckland, Kilby Smith, and Major Ricker, who went to the front to look for enemies, instead o to Owl Creek, which it crosses by two bridges. This ridge was thickly set with trees and undergrowth, and fell away by a sharp declivity to a deep ravine, boggy and flooded with the storms of the past month. Sherman's First Brigade, under Colonel McDowell, was on his right, on the Purdy road as a guard to the bridges over Owl Creek. His Fourth Brigade, under Colonel Buckland, came next in his line, with its left resting on the Corinth road at Shiloh. The Third Brigade, under Colonel Hildebr
R. L. Gibson (search for this): chapter 37
was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn uGibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn up in line of battle, or with the regiments in double column at half distance, according to the nature of the ground. The third line or reserve was composed of the First Corps, under Polk, and three brigades under Breckinridge. Polk's command was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Bark road, at an interval of about eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and
ildebrand, of the Third Brigade, and other officers, visited the picket-line with me during the day. It was well understood all that day and night, throughout Sherman's division, that there was a large rebel force immediately in our front. Buckland strengthened his pickets, and adds, Every officer in my brigade was fully aware of the danger, and such precautions were taken that a surprise was impossible. Sherman's historical raid, pp. 81, 32. Concerning the same reconnaissance, Major Picker wrote as follows: Ibid. When we got back to the picket-lines we found General Sherman there with infantry and artillery, caused by the heavy firing of the enemy on us. General Sherman asked me what was up. I told him I had met and fought the advance of Beauregard's army, that he was advancing on us. General Sherman said it could not be possible, Beauregard was not such a fool as to leave his base of operations and attack us in ours — mere reconnaissance in force. General Buell
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 37
ch, if this order could have been carried out, Grant and his army would have been destroyed. But mnd by the special confidence reposed in him by Grant, he shared with his chief the responsibility f the Confederate cavalry. In his letter to Grant, dated April 5th (page 235), Sherman reports tery on Sunday morning. In Badeau's Life of Grant (page 600) occurs the following correspondence take place. General Sherman's dispatch to Grant, sent with the above to Halleck, is as followsowledge of the Confederate movement in force. Grant and Sherman evidently expected some skirmishinposition. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sherman considered themselves above such ie victor of Donelson. It never reached either Grant or Sherman. Indeed, the latter, with bitter ia book compiled by Prof. Coppee, avowedly from Grant's Reports, and very prejudiced in its conclusievents of the battle, let the eulogists of Generals Grant and Sherman rather plead, than deny, the s[14 more...]
Randal L. Gibson (search for this): chapter 37
line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn up in line of battle, or with the regiments in double column at half
John A. McClernand (search for this): chapter 37
loh. Among the multitude of roads and cross-roads, running in every direction over the broken surface of the Shiloh plateau, one principal road diverged to the left in rear of Shiloh Church from the direct Pittsburg and Corinth road, and following the ridge led into both the Bark road and the Corinth road by numerous approaches. Across this to Sherman's left, with an interval between them, Prentiss's division (the Sixth) was posted. Covering this interval, but some distance back, lay McClernand's division (the First), with its right partially masked by Sherman's left. Some two miles in rear of the front line, and about three-quarters of a mile in advance of Pittsburg, were encamped to the left, Hurlbut's (the Fourth), and to the right, Smith's (the Second) division, the latter under General W. H. L. Wallace. The Federal front was an arc or very obtuse angle extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, which was guarded by Stuar
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 37
Chapter 33: before the battle. General Johnston's prediction. anticipation of battle. strength of Federal position. Beauregard's report. Bragg's sketch of preliminaries. the resolve to attack. its origin. General Lee's letter. preparations. attempt to employ negroes. General Johnston's telegram. orders of March. enthusiasm of troops.--the army marches. field-map. distribution of arms. bad roads. skirmish on April 4th. explanation of orders. providential storm. under arms. reckless fusillade. careless pickets. first line of battle. personal movements of General Johnston. morning of the 5th. this is not War! delay. its causes. rawness of the army. a majestic presence. encouraging the troops. address to army. the Council of War. Beauregard for retreat. Johnston's decision, and reasons. Confederate array. Sherman's theory. reconnaissance. false security. was it a surprise? Federal array. the opponents. On Thursday morning, April 3d,
burg and Corinth road, and following the ridge led into both the Bark road and the Corinth road by numerous approaches. Across this to Sherman's left, with an interval between them, Prentiss's division (the Sixth) was posted. Covering this interval, but some distance back, lay McClernand's division (the First), with its right partially masked by Sherman's left. Some two miles in rear of the front line, and about three-quarters of a mile in advance of Pittsburg, were encamped to the left, Hurlbut's (the Fourth), and to the right, Smith's (the Second) division, the latter under General W. H. L. Wallace. The Federal front was an arc or very obtuse angle extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, which was guarded by Stuart's brigade. General Lew Wallace's division was five or six miles distant, with one brigade at Crump's Landing, and the other two on the Adamsville road, with intervals of some two miles, in observation of Cheatha
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 37
road proved so narrow and bad that the head of Bragg's column did not reach Monterey until 11 A. M.t General Johnston's army was approaching. Bragg says Report of the battle. that, where thit had been provided that Gladden's brigade, of Bragg's corps, should occupy his right. This line ethe afternoon, General Johnston conferred with Bragg, Breckinridge, and other officers. He halted n a little way in its rear. In a little while Bragg's right wing, under Withers, deployed into lint half-past 9, General Johnston sent me to General Bragg to know why the column on his left was not M. His orders were to wait for the passage of Bragg's corps, and to move and form his line in rearof my change.... By the first division General Bragg means Withers's; by the second, Ruggles's.n-chief, General Beauregard, General Polk, General Bragg, and General Breckinridge, are remembered In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades,[33 more...]
William Preston (search for this): chapter 37
ed with some warmth. General Johnston joined the group, but not by preconcert, and Breckinridge came up afterward. General Preston says in his letter of April 18, 1862: General Johnston was within, two miles of the chapel, and anxious to attns ample, General Johnston then ordered the attack for next morning, and we bivouacked in silence for tho night. General Preston informs the writer that General Johnston said little, but closed the discussion with great decision of manner. As he moved off, he said to Preston: I would fight them if they were a million. They can present no greater front between these two creeks than we can; and the more men they crowd in there, the worse we can make it for them. . . . Polk is a true soldiery moved. His first words were: I want to tell you something which I desire remembered. I shall tell nobody but you and Preston, but I do not wish what I say to be forgotten, as it may become very important some day. I told him his wishes should
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