hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 747 total hits in 124 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Preston Pond (search for this): chapter 37
the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton AndePond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn up in line of battle, or with the regiments in double column at half distance, according to the nature of the ground. The third line or reserve was composed of the First Corps, under Polk, and three brigades under Breckinridge. Polk's command was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the
forest in their front. It may even be true, as is alleged, that the experienced eye of some veteran caught here or there the gleam of a bayonet in the background, or detected by other signs the massing of infantry. It is certain that a feeling of uneasiness and mistrust pervaded the whole front line, and gradually spread from soldiers to officers, reaching higher and higher. Every soldier knows that camp-rumor has a certain undefined value, that there is something in the Greek idea of the Pheme, the voice that addresses the general consciousness, the voice that heralded across the Aegean the victory of Plataea to the combatants of Mycale. Known facts, inference and imagination, often construct in an army an hypothesis not to be neglected. Possibly upon some such basis General Prentiss acted in throwing to the front ten companies, under Colonel Moore, to watch the approaches to his position. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sherman considered themselves above such id
Nathan Bedford Forrest (search for this): chapter 37
account is as follows, and is presumably to be received as General Beauregard's own statement of the matter. Life of Forrest, p. 113. Mentioning in a note that it occurred about four o'clock in the open air, on foot, in the road, between the genll, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken by Morgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, was between e writer, then on inspection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his Life of Forrest he makes it 39,630. Hodge, in his sketch of the First Kentucky Brigade, with a different distribution of troops, puts t There are apparently some errors in the return of July, 1862. The writer believes that the figures in Jordan's Life of Forrest approach the truth most nearly. It now behooves us to consider the employment of the Federal army during those fate
P. R. Cleburne (search for this): chapter 37
Sherman's Memoirs, vol. i., p. 235. A Federal reconnaissance had been sent out under Colonel Buckland, and encountered Cleburne's brigade of Hardee's corps, but retired without ascertaining anything important, or surmising that General Johnston's aRegiment, of which he has furnished a valuable memoir to the writer, gives the following statement. His regiment was in Cleburne's brigade, and on the extreme left of Hardee's line. He says: The wishes of General Johnston to move quietly wereHardee's corps, moving on the Ridge road under its methodical commander, assisted by the ardor and energy of Hindman and Cleburne, moved with greater celerity than the other troops. But something of this was due to their apprenticeship in war, underGladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over three miles. Cleburne's brigade was on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, composed of Wo
Alexander H. Stephens (search for this): chapter 37
was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Bark road, at an interval of about eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give support, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 37
left wing of the third line of battle; and Breckinridge's reserve the right wing. Polk's other d the 6th, the first day of the battle. Breckinridge's three brigades — a division, in fact, buttion, owing to the difficulty of the road. Breckinridge had ridden forward to Monterey, and had metoon, General Johnston conferred with Bragg, Breckinridge, and other officers. He halted that night , who had come up on the left, soon after. Breckinridge's line was formed on Polk's right about theardee was not present, but Gilmer was), and Breckinridge, as taking part in it, and then furnishes tegard, General Polk, General Bragg, and General Breckinridge, are remembered as present, and Generalbe successful. I was ordered to go for General Breckinridge, to see the state of his command; but higades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give sup[4 more...]
D. M. Hayden (search for this): chapter 37
Generals Johnston and Bragg in consultation. He hoped, then, to be up in time, and received orders to join in the attack next morning. At midnight he sent a dispatch, saying his artillery was stuck in the mud, and had stopped his train. Major Hayden says General Johnston sent him word, Cut a new road for your column. It did not, however, effect its junction with the other corps until late Saturday afternoon, the 5th, owing to the rains on Friday and Saturday, the storm of Friday night, ay the storm, the mire, and the other causes already assigned-Breckinridge's, Ruggles's, and Cheatham's-General Johnston, followed by his staff, passed from one body of troops to another, encouraging the men both by his words and his presence. Major Hayden, his volunteer aide, says: When they began to cheer his approach, he checked them, because it would call the attention of the enemy to their position. His advice to the men was brief and characteristic. He told them, Look along your gu
Kilby Smith (search for this): chapter 37
les distant. though there was reason to expect an attack. I suppose Colonel McDowell and myself had become tired of his constant prognostications, and paid no attention to him, especially when we were positively informed by men like Buckland, Kilby Smith, and Major Ricker, who went to the front to look for enemies, instead of going to the landing ... On Friday, the 4th, nor officer, nor soldier, looked for an attack, as I can prove. . . . For weeks and months we had heard all sorts of repos division (the First), with its right partially masked by Sherman's left. Some two miles in rear of the front line, and about three-quarters of a mile in advance of Pittsburg, were encamped to the left, Hurlbut's (the Fourth), and to the right, Smith's (the Second) division, the latter under General W. H. L. Wallace. The Federal front was an arc or very obtuse angle extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, which was guarded by Stuart's b
y was added the confusion arising from any change of orders with raw troops as to routes in the labyrinth of roads in that vicinity. Hardee's corps, moving on the Ridge road under its methodical commander, assisted by the ardor and energy of Hindman and Cleburne, moved with greater celerity than the other troops. But something of this was due to their apprenticeship in war, under General Johnston's own eye and inspiration, on outpost duty in Kentucky and in the long and toilsome march from The front line, composed of the Third Corps and Gladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over three miles. Cleburne's brigade was on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, composed of Wood's brigade, and his own under Colonel Shaver. These occupied the centre. The interval, on his right, to Lick Creek, was occupied by Gladden's brigade, detached from Bragg, and put under Hardee's c
235. A Federal reconnaissance had been sent out under Colonel Buckland, and encountered Cleburne's brigade of Hardee's corpsn, posted a couple of miles out on the Corinth road. Colonel Buckland sent a company to its relief, then followed himself wfront of which Hardee's corps was deploying. Indeed, Colonel Buckland, who made the reconnaissance, says that he advanced t, especially when we were positively informed by men like Buckland, Kilby Smith, and Major Ricker, who went to the front to that night. But even I had to guess its purpose. Colonel Buckland, who made the reconnaissance, states that he discoverd. He made a written report of the skirmish that night. Buckland says: The next day, Saturday, April 5th, I visited ere was a large rebel force immediately in our front. Buckland strengthened his pickets, and adds, Every officer in my bhe bridges over Owl Creek. His Fourth Brigade, under Colonel Buckland, came next in his line, with its left resting on the
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...