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Monterey, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
he advanced three, not four or five miles. Sherman's historical raid, Boynton, p. 31. Hardee was, in fact, within two miles. It will be observed that Sherman supposed the artillery belonged to the Confederate cavalry. In his letter to Grant, dated April 5th (page 235), Sherman reports that he lost eleven men, officers and privates, taken prisoners, and eight privates wounded. He says he took ten prisoners. He continues: I infer that the enemy is in some considerable force at Pea Ridge (Monterey), that yesterday morning they crossed a brigade of two regiments of infantry, one regiment of cavalry, and one battery of field-artillery, to the ridges on which the Corinth road lies. They halted the infantry at a point about five miles in my front, sent a detachment to the lane of General Meaks, on the north of Owl Creek, and the cavalry down toward our camp. Though he did not suspect the fact, it was the whole Confederate army which was unfolding along his front. In
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 37
I told him I had met and fought the advance of Beauregard's army, that he was advancing on us. General Sherman said it could not be possible, Beauregard was not such a fool as to leave his base of operations and attack us in ours — mere reconnaissance in force. General Buell says that, so far as preparation for battle is concerned, no army could well have been taken more by surprise than was the Army, of the Tennessee on the 6th of April. Buell's letter, dated January 19, 1865, to United States service Magazine, republished in the New York World, February 29, 1865. Van Horne's Army of the Cumberland, to which General Sherman's special advocate, Mr. Moulton, refers the reader, for a fair and full history of this battle, has the following (page 105): While the national army was unprepared for battle, and unexpectant of such an event, and was passing the night of the 5th in fancied security, Johnston's army of 40,000 men was in close proximity, and ready for the bloody r
Bethel, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
t 1,000 yards' interval, and form a second line of battle. Polk's corps was to form the left wing of the third line of battle; and Breckinridge's reserve the right wing. Polk's other division, under Cheatham, was on outpost duty, at and near Bethel on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad, and was about as far from Mickey's, the point of concentration, as Corinth was. Cheatham's orders were to defend himself if attacked; otherwise, to assemble his forces at Purdy, and pursue the route to Monterey, witence. The first communication is a telegram from General Grant to General Halleck, his commanding officer: Savannah, April 5, 1862. The main force of the enemy is at Corinth, with troops at different points east. Small garrisons are also at Bethel, Jackson, and Humboldt. The number at these places seems constantly to change. The number of the enemy at Corinth, and in supporting distance of it, cannot be far from 80,000 men. Information, obtained through deserters, places their force west
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
t. The number at these places seems constantly to change. The number of the enemy at Corinth, and in supporting distance of it, cannot be far from 80,000 men. Information, obtained through deserters, places their force west at 200,000. One division of Buell's column arrived yesterday. General Buell will be here himself to-day. Some skirmishing took place between our out-guards and the enemy's yesterday and the day before. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck, St. Louis, Missouri. In a subsequent dispatch to Halleck, on the same day, he says that he had received notes, stating that our outposts had been attacked by the enemy, apparently in considerable force. I immediately went up, but found all quiet. . . . They had with them three pieces of artillery, and cavalry and infantry. How much, cannot of course be estimated. I have scarcely the faintest idea of an attack (general one) being made upon us, but will be prepared should such a thing take place.
Fayetteville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ance. There they stood, anxious to go forward; but it was impossible to move in the pitch-darkness, over flooded roads and swollen streams, with the cold, driving rain beating upon them. With almost criminal recklessness, many of the soldiers discharged their small-arms, to find out the condition of the cartridges. General Johnston, as he rode along the lines on the 5th, tried to prevent the recurrence of this. Bragg alludes to it with great severity. Colonel E. L. Drake, of Fayetteville, Tennessee, who was at that time serving in Bate's Second Tennessee Regiment, of which he has furnished a valuable memoir to the writer, gives the following statement. His regiment was in Cleburne's brigade, and on the extreme left of Hardee's line. He says: The wishes of General Johnston to move quietly were not generally regarded; and, at one point on the march, the presence of a wild deer, which ran along the lines, evoked a yell among Hardee's men which could have been heard for mi
Farmington (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
to the attack. These movements were construed by General Lew Wallace as a reconnaissance in force against his own division at Crump's Landing, and held him in check during the 5th and the 6th, the first day of the battle. Breckinridge's three brigades — a division, in fact, but by courtesy a reserve corps-having received their orders on the afternoon of April 3d, E. P. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, p. 87. moved from Burnsville on April 4th, at 3 A. M., by way of Farmington, toward Monterey, fourteen miles distant. Some Enfield rifles, with accoutrements and ammunition, just received, were distributed about nightfall to supply deficiencies, and rations were prepared during the night. Ibid. The road was even worse than those from Corinth. The corps struggled painfully on, with poor progress. After a hard day's march, it bivouacked on the road. Part of the artillery was late at night reaching its position, owing to the difficulty of the road. Breckin
Owl Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
west of Shiloh church, where Lick Creek and Owl Creek approach most nearly, a space of about threed occupy his right. This line extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek. General Johnston had reached eplied: There is Lick Creek on my right, and Owl Creek on my left. These creeks effectually protecbrigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over twas on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, comreston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. Ao the lane of General Meaks, on the north of Owl Creek, and the cavalry down toward our camp. Tg to the right and front, follows a ridge to Owl Creek, which it crosses by two bridges. This ridghe Purdy road as a guard to the bridges over Owl Creek. His Fourth Brigade, under Colonel Buckland extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, wh
Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
onfederates were gathering in its front. Premising that General Grant kept his headquarters at Savannah, nine miles from Pittsburg by water and six or seven by land, and left a large discretion in th then, after dark, drew back to our lines, and reported the fact by letter to General Grant, at Savannah; but thus far we had not positively detected the presence of infantry, for cavalry regiments gerst communication is a telegram from General Grant to General Halleck, his commanding officer: Savannah, April 5, 1862. The main force of the enemy is at Corinth, with troops at different points eith 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and Nelson and Crittenden's divisions-14,000 men-left at Savannah? Why the calm of Saturday and the confusion of Sunday? For the events of the battle, let the ieved to be still at Purdy. The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north ba
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ernmost route, known as the Ridge road, which, near Shiloh, led into another, known as the Bark road. Bivouac uninstructed as the troops who marched out against Shiloh. Field and staff officers, fresh from the countingponsibility for whatever was done or left undone at Shiloh. We have already seen his opinion on the natural seen repeatedly asserted that Grant was surprised at Shiloh, but the evidence to the contrary is incontrovertibtuation and transactions of the Federal army before Shiloh, as taken from their own writers. According to line, with its left resting on the Corinth road at Shiloh. The Third Brigade, under Colonel Hildebrand, stooere posted in an open field to the left and rear of Shiloh. Among the multitude of roads and cross-roads, t six miles. The arrangement of Grant's army at Shiloh has been subjected to very severe and probably justgly intrenched place. No Confederate who fought at Shiloh has ever said that he found any point on that blood
Caffey (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ched by the direct road to Pittsburg, through Monterey. This road proved so narrow and bad that the head of Bragg's column did not reach Monterey until 11 A. M. on the 4th, but bivouacked that night was to allow Bragg's corps, whose route from Monterey crossed the Ridge or Bark road at that point, his forces at Purdy, and pursue the route to Monterey, with proper military precautions. Acting on4th, at 3 A. M., by way of Farmington, toward Monterey, fourteen miles distant. Some Enfield rifles,the road. Breckinridge had ridden forward to Monterey, and had met Generals Johnston and Bragg in cnth on the morning of the 4th, and arrived at Monterey at 1 P. M. Soon after, Clanton's Alabama Cava and other officers. He halted that night at Monterey. He handed to Munford and some others of his General Johnston or General Beauregard, from Monterey, which has never been alluded to, and which mon, while Ruggles's division was to move from Monterey on the road to Purdy, which crossed the Bark [4 more...]
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