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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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seven o'clock his column was also put in motion; and Gladden's and Withers's other brigades were placed in line of battle, in due time, the lrode to Bragg's position; and, under his orders, by seven o'clock, Withers's division was put in motion, as has been stated. General Johnstottle way in its rear. In a little while Bragg's right wing, under Withers, deployed into line, but eight, nine o'clock came, and the divisioolk of my change.... By the first division General Bragg means Withers's; by the second, Ruggles's. The special orders as to movement of troops directed Bragg to move from Monterey to Mickey's with Withers's division, while Ruggles's division was to move from Monterey on th and deployed without interference or obstruction from Hardee's or Withers's division. But Bragg's order changing Ruggles's line of march, a in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong
reliminary fighting of the 3d and 4th of April necessarily put division and army commanders on the alert. The evidence he cites for this is as follows: Prentiss had doubled his pickets the day before (the 5th), and had a reconnaissance of a regiment out at three o'clock on the morning of the 6th; he received the earlieste combatants of Mycale. Known facts, inference and imagination, often construct in an army an hypothesis not to be neglected. Possibly upon some such basis General Prentiss acted in throwing to the front ten companies, under Colonel Moore, to watch the approaches to his position. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sh, and following the ridge led into both the Bark road and the Corinth road by numerous approaches. Across this to Sherman's left, with an interval between them, Prentiss's division (the Sixth) was posted. Covering this interval, but some distance back, lay McClernand's division (the First), with its right partially masked by She
eneral which indicated the presence of a much larger Federal force than previous information had induced us to expect. For a moment after receiving this report, he appeared to be in profound thought, when he turned to me, saying: I will fight them if there is a million of them! I have as many men as can be well handled on this field, and I can handle as many men as they can. He then proceeded with the inspection of his line. The Hon. Jacob Thompson, Secretary of the Interior under Mr. Buchanan, who was present on the staff of General Beauregard, furnishes the writer with the following notes of an interview which he held with General Johnston on the way to this conference, as he thinks, but which more probably occurred soon after it: General Johnston took my arm, and remarked, I perceive that General Beauregard is averse to bringing on the attack on the enemy in the morning, on the ground that we have lost an opportunity by delay. I replied that I knew that such was the f
Patton Anderson (search for this): chapter 37
to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn up in line of battle, or with the regiments in double column at half distance, according to the nature of the ground. The third line or reserve was composed of the First Corps, under Polk, and three brigades under Breckinridge. Polk's command was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on
e's corps not being sufficiently strong, it had been provided that Gladden's brigade, of Bragg's corps, should occupy his right. This line ey, and before seven o'clock his column was also put in motion; and Gladden's and Withers's other brigades were placed in line of battle, in dConfederate array: The front line, composed of the Third Corps and Gladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Centre. The interval, on his right, to Lick Creek, was occupied by Gladden's brigade, detached from Bragg, and put under Hardee's command forhe battle. Hardee's three brigades numbered 6,789 effectives, and Gladden added 2,235 more — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 37
herman to believe them aware of the presence of the Confederate army in their front on the 5th. Else why was General Lew Wallace with 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and Nelson and Crittenden's divisions-14,000 men-left at Savannah? Why the calm of Saturday and the confusion of Sunday? For the events of the battle, let the eulogists of Generals Grant and Sherman rather plead, than deny, the surprise that befell them on Sunday morning. Boynton says (page 34): The officers of General Thomas's army, who had charge of the pickets a few days after the battle, rode over the line from which the rebels moved to the attack. Everywhere were signs of the deliberation with which the enemy formed his forces. The routes, by which each corps and division of the first line was to march to its position in the woods, were blazed upon the trees, and the entire force of the enemy went into line for the attack wholly undisturbed, and with as munch order and precision as if forming upon mark
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 37
f Grant (page 600) occurs the following correspondence. The first communication is a telegram from General Grant to General Halleck, his commanding officer: Savannah, April 5, 1862. The main force of the enemy is at Corinth, with troops at difftook place between our out-guards and the enemy's yesterday and the day before. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck, St. Louis, Missouri. In a subsequent dispatch to Halleck, on the same day, he says that he had received notHalleck, on the same day, he says that he had received notes, stating that our outposts had been attacked by the enemy, apparently in considerable force. I immediately went up, but found all quiet. . . . They had with them three pieces of artillery, and cavalry and infantry. How much, cannot of course beus, but will be prepared should such a thing take place. General Sherman's dispatch to Grant, sent with the above to Halleck, is as follows: Pittsburg Landing, April 5, 1862. sir: All is quiet along my lines now. We are in the act of exchang
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 37
ured. Sherman says he took ten prisoners. Sherman's Memoirs, vol. i., p. 235. A Federal reconnd left a large discretion in the hands of General Sherman, as his friend and most experienced offiche advanced three, not four or five miles. Sherman's historical raid, Boynton, p. 31. Hardee was of Sherman (page 11), which is virtually General Sherman's own utterance, denies any purpose or nepared should such a thing take place. General Sherman's dispatch to Grant, sent with the above rs in his evidence on Worthington's trial. Sherman's historical raid, by Boynton, p. 29. The Worthington had been alarmed for safety. Sherman says, further on, that, after the reconnaissaunderstood all that day and night, throughout Sherman's division, that there was a large rebel forcd by the heavy firing of the enemy on us. General Sherman asked me what was up. I told him I had med-cannon range, passed in our camps, says General Sherman, without any unusual event. Such is a[30 more...]
Thomas Jordan (search for this): chapter 37
differing in details, agree in all essential facts. The council was held at the cross-roads, a few hundred yards from the headquarters of the night before. Colonel Jordan's account is as follows, and is presumably to be received as General Beauregard's own statement of the matter. Life of Forrest, p. 113. Mentioning in a notrgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, was between 35,000 and 36,000 strong. Jordan, in an official report, made in July, 1862, to the writer, then on inspection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his orty-seventh Tennessee Regiment, which came up on the 7th. There are apparently some errors in the return of July, 1862. The writer believes that the figures in Jordan's Life of Forrest approach the truth most nearly. It now behooves us to consider the employment of the Federal army during those fateful first days of April,
John H. Morgan (search for this): chapter 37
s brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken by Morgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, was between 35,000 and 36,000 strong. Jordan, in an official report, made in July, 1862, to the writer, then on inspection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his Life of Forrest he makes it 39,630. Hodge, in his sketch of the First Kentucky Brigade, with a different distribution of troops, puts the total at 39,695, which he says
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