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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 13
e forces in South-Carolina; and as that State was threatened with invasion, he now hurried forward to perfect arrangements; his successor in our command was General D. H. Hill, (brother-in-law to Stonewall Jackson,) and a very superior officer. General Griffith (cousin of the President) commanded the brigade. From the moment of his arrival, Hill was continually in the saddle, and, nearly always alone, soon made himself master of every acre in Loudon County. I shall have to speak of this officer again. He had already achieved fame at Little Bethel as colonel of the Carolina Volunteers, and greatly emulated Jackson in all his doings. Having selected fine in such bad order that it required twenty-four oxen to draw one thirty-two-pounder a distance of twenty-five miles, and taking not less than three days to do it. Hill worked hard, however, and placed six heavy pieces in position, and astonished the enemy by shelling them out of their battery behind Edwards's Ferry. In the me
; a hill was fortified to the south, commanding Fort Evans; and another, more import. ant still, north of the town, which commanded every approach. Figuratively, our fortifications were lions without teeth; for guns could not be spared at Manassas; and the roads were in such bad order that it required twenty-four oxen to draw one thirty-two-pounder a distance of twenty-five miles, and taking not less than three days to do it. Hill worked hard, however, and placed six heavy pieces in position, and astonished the enemy by shelling them out of their battery behind Edwards's Ferry. In the mean time it had become apparent to all that some grand move was planning in Maryland; for heavy masses of troops were continually seen moving from point to point. Our cavalry force was therefore increased, and guarded the Upper Potomac; and now all being prepared as far as our means permitted, we committed the event to fortune, and in November received the joyful order to go into winter quarters.
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