hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 494 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 418 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 336 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 210 2 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 204 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
John Pope 189 1 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 152 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 132 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

Found 87 total hits in 32 results.

1 2 3 4
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
der, was bullied unmercifully by the Northern press, and being in Washington on business, where he dined with McClellan, he was on the following morning arrested and sent to Fort Warren, without a word of explanation. Among the numerous incidents that fell under my notice illustrative of the sometimes tragical, sometimes laughable, occurrences of civil war, the following may be mentioned as properly pertaining to the battle of Leesburgh. Two young men, brothers, acquaintances of mine in Kentucky, had always differed in politics, and when the war broke out, Howard, the younger, sought the Southern army, and Alfred that of the North. They shook hands at parting, and said it was probable they should meet again on some field or other. Alfred obtained a captain's commission; Howard, with many fellow-statesmen, shouldered a musket in our regiment. When the battle was over, Howard was searching for the bodies of friends who had fallen by his side, and stumbled over something. Halloa!
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
bels 1 The fact is, they had always held undisputed possession of the island; yet the mainland was so much higher as to command it, and had our artillery been present in the battle, not twenty men of their whole force could have escaped. When at length the story was truthfully told by the New-York Times and Tribune, the whole North was thrown into consternation and mourning over the massacre, as they termed it, and began reviling each other for urging McClellan to advance at all against Richmond. Massachusetts was particularly affected by the direful news, for two of its pet regiments (the Fifteenth and Twenty-third) had suffered fearfully, and many young men of the first families had fallen, including the promising son of the poet, Oliver Wendell Holmes, most of the men having been enrolled in Boston and Worcester. New-York also felt very much humbled on account of the decimation of the Forty-fourth, one of its crack regiments, which boasted of more professional pugilists and b
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 12: Effects of the battle of Leesburgh, or Ball's Bluff, on public opinion in the country, North and South the Yankees claim a victory as usual General Stone arrested and sent to Fort Warren remarkable incidents of the war a Fraternal Rencontre the negroes with either army Humorous incidents Evans is sent to defend his native State, South-Carolina General D. D. Hill assumes command fortifications are erected we prepare for winter quarters. From two or three truth, the Virginians did very little. Poor Stone, the Federal commander, was bullied unmercifully by the Northern press, and being in Washington on business, where he dined with McClellan, he was on the following morning arrested and sent to Fort Warren, without a word of explanation. Among the numerous incidents that fell under my notice illustrative of the sometimes tragical, sometimes laughable, occurrences of civil war, the following may be mentioned as properly pertaining to the batt
Harrison's Island (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
few days the rebels would suddenly drop out of Leesburgh ; others said, We shall begin to make history next week; let all prepare for a succession of Union victories that shall eclipse all the doings of the Old World! It may well be supposed that enough had occurred to disenchant them of these bombastic ideas; but no, the Federal generals, to cover up their defeat by misrepresentation, acknowledged having met with reverses at Ball's Bluff, but triumphantly rejoined-: We have captured Harrison's Island, and hold it against all efforts of the rebels 1 The fact is, they had always held undisputed possession of the island; yet the mainland was so much higher as to command it, and had our artillery been present in the battle, not twenty men of their whole force could have escaped. When at length the story was truthfully told by the New-York Times and Tribune, the whole North was thrown into consternation and mourning over the massacre, as they termed it, and began reviling each other
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
regiments (the Fifteenth and Twenty-third) had suffered fearfully, and many young men of the first families had fallen, including the promising son of the poet, Oliver Wendell Holmes, most of the men having been enrolled in Boston and Worcester. New-York also felt very much humbled on account of the decimation of the Forty-fourth, one of its crack regiments, which boasted of more professional pugilists and blackguards than any other from that State, except the red-legged Fire Zouaves. Pennsylvania was in mourning for the rout of the First California Regiment, (fifteen companies strong,) which had been raised by Baker in Philadelphia, and which was petted and feasted, and paraded at Washington by Lincoln himself, and called the Invincibles. Other States had each its special reason for mourning, and so, from one reason or another, the entire press howled over the disaster for a full month. In the South, however, our success was not regarded with proportionate admiration; the peo
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
d to look upon the Yankees with contempt, and especially because they didn't fight to suit them. Talk of dem Yanks comin‘ down to whip us! Dey must be sick! Why, massa can whale a dozen of 'em ‘fore coffee is hot, fair fight. Dem Nordon darkies is no ‘count, and yet dey puts on all de airs in the worle. If eber I ketch any of dern darkies comin‘ in my way, or foolin‘ wid me, dis chile is goin‘ to make somebody holler, sure! General Evans had received command of all the forces in South-Carolina; and as that State was threatened with invasion, he now hurried forward to perfect arrangements; his successor in our command was General D. H. Hill, (brother-in-law to Stonewall Jackson,) and a very superior officer. General Griffith (cousin of the President) commanded the brigade. From the moment of his arrival, Hill was continually in the saddle, and, nearly always alone, soon made himself master of every acre in Loudon County. I shall have to speak of this officer again. He
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
arly always alone, soon made himself master of every acre in Loudon County. I shall have to speak of this officer again. He had already achieved fame at Little Bethel as colonel of the Carolina Volunteers, and greatly emulated Jackson in all his doings. Having selected fine sites near the river, he commenced fortifying with great vigor, much to the annoyance of the enemy, who had meditated crossing the ice during heavy winter, and surprising us before reenforcements could march up from Centreville. The mud-work at Fort Evans was also enlarged, covered, made bomb-proof, and pierced for six thirty-two pounders; long lines of rifle-pits were dug during night close to the river and elsewhere; a hill was fortified to the south, commanding Fort Evans; and another, more import. ant still, north of the town, which commanded every approach. Figuratively, our fortifications were lions without teeth; for guns could not be spared at Manassas; and the roads were in such bad order that it req
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ibune, the whole North was thrown into consternation and mourning over the massacre, as they termed it, and began reviling each other for urging McClellan to advance at all against Richmond. Massachusetts was particularly affected by the direful news, for two of its pet regiments (the Fifteenth and Twenty-third) had suffered fearfully, and many young men of the first families had fallen, including the promising son of the poet, Oliver Wendell Holmes, most of the men having been enrolled in Boston and Worcester. New-York also felt very much humbled on account of the decimation of the Forty-fourth, one of its crack regiments, which boasted of more professional pugilists and blackguards than any other from that State, except the red-legged Fire Zouaves. Pennsylvania was in mourning for the rout of the First California Regiment, (fifteen companies strong,) which had been raised by Baker in Philadelphia, and which was petted and feasted, and paraded at Washington by Lincoln himself, and
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ernal Rencontre the negroes with either army Humorous incidents Evans is sent to defend his native State, South-Carolina General D. D. Hill assumes command fortifications are erected we prepare for winter quarters. From two or three weeks previous to the battle of Leesburgh, the Northern papers overflowed with joyful expectations regarding the movements then in preparation. The Administration organ at Washington predicted that in a few days the rebels would suddenly drop out of Leesburgh ; others said, We shall begin to make history next week; let all prepare for a succession of Union victories that shall eclipse all the doings of the Old World! It may well be supposed that enough had occurred to disenchant them of these bombastic ideas; but no, the Federal generals, to cover up their defeat by misrepresentation, acknowledged having met with reverses at Ball's Bluff, but triumphantly rejoined-: We have captured Harrison's Island, and hold it against all efforts of the reb
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
as thrown into consternation and mourning over the massacre, as they termed it, and began reviling each other for urging McClellan to advance at all against Richmond. Massachusetts was particularly affected by the direful news, for two of its pet regiments (the Fifteenth and Twenty-third) had suffered fearfully, and many young men of the first families had fallen, including the promising son of the poet, Oliver Wendell Holmes, most of the men having been enrolled in Boston and Worcester. New-York also felt very much humbled on account of the decimation of the Forty-fourth, one of its crack regiments, which boasted of more professional pugilists and blackguards than any other from that State, except the red-legged Fire Zouaves. Pennsylvania was in mourning for the rout of the First California Regiment, (fifteen companies strong,) which had been raised by Baker in Philadelphia, and which was petted and feasted, and paraded at Washington by Lincoln himself, and called the Invincibles.
1 2 3 4