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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 26
arding these events will not be uninteresting, as illustrative of their feeling and exaggeration of truth, namely: Washington, May 26th. We have passed a very exciting day in Washington. The intelligence received last evening to the effect tWashington. The intelligence received last evening to the effect that General Banks had fallen back from Strasburgh to Winchester, was understood to indicate rather a precautionary measure on his part, than the result of any immediate movement of the enemy. The tidings of this morning, announcing the occupation oftroduced the system of lying as a part of the strategy of war, and, indeed, as the means of beginning it, for he was at Washington for some months before the close of Buchanan's administration. The first lie that we remember, bearing directly on thences of the former. The second important lie in the initiation of hostilities was the assembling of troops in force at Washington on the pretext that an attack would be made on the Capital, and the inauguration of Lincoln would not otherwise be perm
Newtown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
y field was crowded with fugitives who waited to be captured, while scores of ambulances were filled with footsore or wounded.Federals, and driven to the rear, the men seeming speechless from astonishment. Colonels, Majors, Captains, rank and file, were marched indiscriminately to the rear, while on dashed our wearied cavalry, pistolling and cutting down the still retreating enemy. So it continued all day long on the twenty-fourth, until, perfectly broken down with the labor, we camped at Newtown, a few miles from Winchester. Ewell had not been able to get into Winchester before Banks arrived; and as the place was strongly fortified, Jackson deferred all attack until the twenty-fifth, by which time it was hoped our exhausted infantry would arrive. For miles along the road towards and beyond Winchester, large and innumerable fires told that the enemy were destroying their supplies, and already on their retreat towards the Potomac. Such a sight I could never have conceived. The
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
rest, we all proceeded across the Shenandoah Mountains, and camped near Lurah, in Page Valley, about twelve miles from Front Royal — the rear of Banks's army in the Valley. This requires some explanation. When Shields found Jackson strongly posm the west. Banks also had the same destination, having his force scattered up and down the Valley, the rear being at Front Royal. Blenker and Milroy were similarly bound through Western Virginia, but their defeat had diverted Fremont from his prois column on the flanks, and seize the baggage. With this object Ewell started northwards, and we southwards, towards Front Royal. Although we had been camped within twelve miles of the latter place several days, our movements and position had beely towards Winchester to seize the fortifications, and get still farther in his rear. We had accomplished much at Front Royal and Buckton station, and, expecting that Banks would not attempt to move for several days, were meditating proper meth
Newmarket, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ey were to fall back on McDowell, leaving the enemy to infer that strong forces were near at hand; Jackson, in the mean while, refreshed his own and Johnston's men, and began to retreat through McDowell more swiftly than he had advanced Marching at a rapid rate, he reached the Valley Pike at Mount Crawford, eighteen miles from Staunton, and learned that Banks's force had fallen back from Harrisonsburgh to Strasburgh. Moving at a fast rate down the Valley Pike, Jackson proceeded onwards to Newmarket, and was there joined by Ewell's force of ten thousand, which had been awaiting us at Swift Run Gap. Our whole force now amounted to about fourteen thousand men. After a little rest, we all proceeded across the Shenandoah Mountains, and camped near Lurah, in Page Valley, about twelve miles from Front Royal — the rear of Banks's army in the Valley. This requires some explanation. When Shields found Jackson strongly posted at McGackeysville, he declined to advance against him, as I hav
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
d by us; with Ewell marching rapidly towards Winchester to seize the fortifications, and get still fabor, we camped at Newtown, a few miles from Winchester. Ewell had not been able to get into WinWinchester before Banks arrived; and as the place was strongly fortified, Jackson deferred all attack u For miles along the road towards and beyond Winchester, large and innumerable fires told that the e seemed on fire, yet every approach towards Winchester was still as death, which led many to supposf the twenty-fifth, Jackson began to move on Winchester. Dense columns of smoke issuing from the tof this morning, announcing the occupation of Winchester by Jackson, and the withdrawal of Banks, aft retreat, and the still greater slaughter at Winchester.) Presently General Williams, who had illiams and staff. While retreating through Winchester, women from the houses opened fire of pistols composed of negroes, and that the women of Winchester killed a great many of the Yankees. God f[9 more...]
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
e Valley, push on through Harrisonburgh, and attack us at McGackeysville; but, after some days, it was ascertained that he remained enjoying the fruits of the battle of Kearnstown, and was waiting until Milroy and Blenker should clear Western Virginia, and arrive on a line with him, when they would all join McDowell at Fredericksburgh. Jackson was not many days at McGackeysville, when a courier from the Georgian, Colonel Johnson, arrived, and informed him that Blenker and Milroy, with their Dutch division, were advancing eastward in Western Virginia, and that his small force of fifteen hundred men was falling back before them. When this news was received, Jackson, finding his original command fully rested, left Ewell's force of ten thousand at McGackeysville, and sallied out during the night, none knew whither. Keeping to the mountains until he arrived at Port Republic, he struck the Valley Pike there, proceeded on, by night and day, towards Staunton, and then, without entering
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
head of the column, and the soldiers raised a hearty cheer as he passed, which continued up the column as he advanced up the front. General Banks soon followed, and was greeted with similar manifestations of pleasure and confidence in their commander. We followed closely, and the road was filled with wagons, some broken down, others with the mules cut suddenly away, and all deserted by their drivers, who Had taken fright on the appearance of a few of the enemy's cavalry, and fled in a Bull Run stampede. The infantry were kept somewhat in the rear until the General and his bodyguard had advanced, to ascertain the position of the enemy, and the space between was filled with the baggage-wagons, which were being repossessed by their timorous guardians, under the inspiring influence of wagon-master's whip, who, enraged at the cowardly rout, was driving them back with unmerciful lashes to their deserted charges. Men were now seen flocking back, and the baggage-train was again supp
Middleton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
uth, we had been marched and overworked too much to take full advantage of the glorious opportunity now presented; but all did the best they could. The retreat of the enemy was so rapid that it was impossible for infantry to keep up with them, and most of the duty devolved on cavalry. They seized hundreds of fresh cavalry horses, remounted, and were again after the enemy at full gallop, capturing scores of prisoners every mile, and yet the pursuit continued all day. At the village of Middleton a New-Jersey regiment of horse turned to fight, but our cavalry rode against them so furiously that the enemy were instantly unhorsed, fifty of them being killed, one hundred wounded, and two hundred and fifty captured; so that from wagons, baggage, dead, wounded, and prisoners, the roads were almost impassable. Wagons by the dozen were driven from the road, and the traces having been cut, the teams might be seen running wildly about in all directions. The scene was that of Manassas over
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
rategy of war, and, indeed, as the means of beginning it, for he was at Washington for some months before the close of Buchanan's administration. The first lie that we remember, bearing directly on the beginning of hostilities, was the pledge made by Buchanan to the South-Carolina delegation in Congress, that the military status of Charleston harbor should not be changed. The pledge was violated on the night of the twenty-sixth December, 1860, by Major Anderson removing his forces from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and attempting to destroy the defences of the former. The second important lie in the initiation of hostilities was the assembling of troops in force at Washington on the pretext that an attack would be made on the Capital, and the inauguration of Lincoln would not otherwise be permitted. The third was, the assurance that due notice would be given to the authorities of Charleston, if it were determined to reenforce or provision Fort Sumter. The notice was not given unt
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
nths before the close of Buchanan's administration. The first lie that we remember, bearing directly on the beginning of hostilities, was the pledge made by Buchanan to the South-Carolina delegation in Congress, that the military status of Charleston harbor should not be changed. The pledge was violated on the night of the twenty-sixth December, 1860, by Major Anderson removing his forces from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and attempting to destroy the defences of the former. The second impo assurance that due notice would be given to the authorities of Charleston, if it were determined to reenforce or provision Fort Sumter. The notice was not given until the fleet despatched for the purpose was presumed to be at the mouth of Charleston harbor. But we have no idea of going further with the narrative. The lying of the Yankee Government, Generals, newspapers, and people about the war, is an Augean stable into which we will neither take our readers nor go ourselves. Northe
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