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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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long the Valley Pike all night, for we were but few in number, and Shields's force very large. Without much rest, we pushed through Strasburion to his own division, was to consist of the troops of Banks and Shields, from the Shenandoah Valley, and those of Milroy, Blenker, and Freon the east. Knowing that McDowell dared not move alone, and that Shields threatened to annihilate Jackson, Ewell had wisely crossed the Ri and hastened to our assistance. It was now hoped by all, that Shields would leave the Valley, push on through Harrisonburgh, and attack ks's army in the Valley. This requires some explanation. When Shields found Jackson strongly posted at McGackeysville, he declined to adter, and not likely to trouble them in the Valley again, Banks and Shields were quietly making their way towards Fredericksburgh, unconsciouspot, not only for Banks himself, but for supplying the commands of Shields, Fremont, Milroy, Blenker, and others, besides the accumulated sto
hereditary sovereign, presented no difficulty. It is probable that he first introduced the system of lying as a part of the strategy of war, and, indeed, as the means of beginning it, for he was at Washington for some months before the close of Buchanan's administration. The first lie that we remember, bearing directly on the beginning of hostilities, was the pledge made by Buchanan to the South-Carolina delegation in Congress, that the military status of Charleston harbor should not be changeBuchanan to the South-Carolina delegation in Congress, that the military status of Charleston harbor should not be changed. The pledge was violated on the night of the twenty-sixth December, 1860, by Major Anderson removing his forces from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and attempting to destroy the defences of the former. The second important lie in the initiation of hostilities was the assembling of troops in force at Washington on the pretext that an attack would be made on the Capital, and the inauguration of Lincoln would not otherwise be permitted. The third was, the assurance that due notice would be give
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 26
s in a new light, and aroused serious apprehensions, not only for the safety of his little command, but for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the city of Baltimore, and even the Capital. Later in the day the reports of the rioting in Baltimore and of the rout of the entire force of Banks, by the quick march and overwhelming numbers of Jackson, intensified the excitement. The secessionist sympathizers, too greatly elated to conceal their joy, openly expressed their belief that the host of Jeff. Davis will overrun Maryland and the District within twenty-four hours. One truth about the war told by a Yankee. Wilson, says a Northern journal, one of the Senators from Massachusetts in the Yankee Congress, confessed or charged the other day, in a speech from his desk, that there was an organized system of lying practised in the management of the war. This is probably the first truth that Wilson himself has ever told about the war. It is notorious that old Scott justifies lying as
Turner Ashby (search for this): chapter 26
est, we pushed through Strasburgh, and took the road towards Charlottesville, and had thus got a start of over twenty miles ere the enemy's cavalry came in sight. Ashby, as usual, was in the rear, and nobly beat back the foe, and saved us from annihilation; every rise in the road was disputed by him, until at last the Federals seeport, and ere he had crossed over to that town, our advance was well up with him; while the number of dead, wounded, and prisoners along the road showed what havoc Ashby had made among the foe with his cavalry. Hats, caps, muskets, boots, wagons, dead, wounded, prisoners, burning stores, sabres, pistols, etc., lined every yard of e far more fatigued than they, the punishment inflicted and the vigor of our pursuit were not half as effective as they might have been. Never giving up, however, Ashby still hung on their rear, and unmercifully thrashed them whenever they turned to fight. At last, totally prostrated from fatigue, and helpless as children, we rea
e than a few hours. At McGackeysville we found that Ewell, with a force of ten thousand men, had crossed the B and that Shields threatened to annihilate Jackson, Ewell had wisely crossed the Ridge and hastened to our assson, finding his original command fully rested, left Ewell's force of ten thousand at McGackeysville, and salliceeded onwards to Newmarket, and was there joined by Ewell's force of ten thousand, which had been awaiting us en, on the morning of May twenty-second, Jackson and Ewell, with fourteen thousand men, were meditating an attack on their rear. To make all sure, Ewell was detached with ten thousand men to seize Winchester, the enemythe flanks, and seize the baggage. With this object Ewell started northwards, and we southwards, towards Fronteat-by the Valley Pike-and that was held by us; with Ewell marching rapidly towards Winchester to seize the for camped at Newtown, a few miles from Winchester. Ewell had not been able to get into Winchester before Bank
The lying of the Yankee Government, Generals, newspapers, and people about the war, is an Augean stable into which we will neither take our readers nor go ourselves. Northern account of front Royal and Winchester. The following extract from the correspondence of the New-York World admits the defeat of the Federals, and tries to palliate it by exaggerating the superiority of the Confederates in numbers: William H. Mapes, commanding pioneer corps, arrived and reported to Colonel Kenley, who gave orders immediately where they should be stationed, and they continued with the remainder of the little force, doing noble service, and holding in check successfully not less than six times their number. Seeing the danger of their position, the commander of the brigade gave the order to retreat, which they did in excellent order, across the Shenandoah. Mapes was then ordered to burn the bridge, which was accordingly fired, by pacing upon it piles of fence-rails, but was not de
e ground in great confusion, thrown away by the panic-stricken soldiers . Colonel Gordon and staff are safe; also General Williams and staff. While retreating through Winchester, women from the houses opened fire of pistols upon our soldiers, and killed a great many of them. My reader will not fail to observe from the above, that General Banks's body. guard is composed of negroes, and that the women of Winchester killed a great many of the Yankees. God forbid that any army of ours should be so broken up and so totally demoralized as was that of the vain-glorious and arrant Abolitionist, General N. P. Banks. How many millions of dollars they have lost in this retreat of three days will never be known, and perhaps can not be calculated; but this I do know, that we are now wallowing in the luxuries of life, and Jackson has sufficient stores to last an indefinite time, should we successfully transport them out of the Valley. Excuse haste, and believe me yours, Ashton.
s, from the Shenandoah Valley, and those of Milroy, Blenker, and Fremont from Western Virginia. destined to martle of Kearnstown, and was waiting until Milroy and Blenker should clear Western Virginia, and arrive on a linean, Colonel Johnson, arrived, and informed him that Blenker and Milroy, with their Dutch division, were advanciled McDowell, with the heavy brigades of Milroy and Blenker in line of battle before him. This valley was not mskirmishing began in all directions. Milroy and Blenker seemed confident of success, and handled their trooeir commands would not stand close work, Milroy and Blenker marched their men by the right flank up, and on, tois success at McDowell had so frightened Milroy and Blenker that they had called upon Fremont, who was a few mnd down the Valley, the rear being at Front Royal. Blenker and Milroy were similarly bound through Western Virsupplying the commands of Shields, Fremont, Milroy, Blenker, and others, besides the accumulated stores destine
, that he had been hovering around Fredericksburgh, on the Rappahannock, watching a division of McDowell, who held the nucleus of a force This force, in addition to his own division, was to consist to march on Richmond from the west, while McClellan made his attack on the east. Knowing that McDowell dared not move alone, and that Shields threatened to annihilate Jackson, Ewell had wisely cros Blenker should clear Western Virginia, and arrive on a line with him, when they would all join McDowell at Fredericksburgh. Jackson was not many days at McGackeysville, when a courier from the Georgt of Colonel Johnson's little force, which was drawn up in a narrow valley, at a village called McDowell, with the heavy brigades of Milroy and Blenker in line of battle before him. This valley was nos of Shields, Fremont, Milroy, Blenker, and others, besides the accumulated stores destined for McDowell. Such a race, riot, confusion, loss in men and materiel as Banks suffered on that eventful day
e cowardly rout, was driving them back with unmerciful lashes to their deserted charges. Men were now seen flocking back, and the baggage-train was again supplied with teamsters . .. The other end of our column encountered the force which was to have been sent to attack our rear. First the Zouaves d'afrique, body-guard of General Banks, had been stationed in the rear, to burn the bridge across Meadow Creek, three miles from Strasburgh, after all had passed except the cavalry, under General Hatch, who was yet to come up and ford the river. While they were besmearing the bridge with tar, unexpecting any danger, the enemy charged down upon them from the mountain on the left, cutting them up in the most unmerciful manner, and capturing all of them except five . . .. Presently there was a commotion, a sobbing among the women, and a running to and fro, which brought me to my feet in time to find our forces were started on a retreat; and, as I saw flames rising from the burning bu
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