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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 3
vision to indicate that such was the fact. The station itself was a low, one-storied building, about seventy-five feet in length, with bales and boxes scattered about; a house of refreshment close by was uninviting, and except one or two small cottages scattered here and there, naught was to be seen. Two or three tents were standing close to the depot, with lights in them; a guard here and there walked his post noiselessly, and in the distance, on neighboring hills, a few smouldering camp-fires were discernible. Only a mound of newly turned earth, here and there, indicated that the spade and shovel had been at work in fortifying, while the muzzles of a few guns in the embrasures pointed up the track towards Washington. A trooper or two would occasionally go jingling past in the direction of a cottage a few hundred yards in advance; and from the lights in windows, and groups seated round camp-fires, in the orchard, I learned that the dwelling was General Beauregard's Headquarters.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 3
ticles were chiefly (and perhaps solely) to be found North. We were rich in cotton, sugar, tobacco, rice, hemp, etc., but these were not commissary stores, or absolute necessaries, and as we did not produce any other, and were not in any sense a manufacturing people, we found the whole North ridiculing us and our preparations for conquering our independence. Indeed, their common taunt was, How can you live without us? Why, we will starve you into submission. At the outset, however, President Davis and his military advisers had foreseen, and provided for, many of our most needful supplies : with funds immediately furnished by private negotiation, they had bought up many millions of various rations in Northern markets, while merchants by the thousand quietly proceeded up the country and procured immense supplies of merchandise and wares, before the North had arrived at any distinct idea of our determination to be free, and of the certainty of warfare. The Israelites, as usual, far
t importance in many ways. Troops were also hurriedly despatched to Western Virginia, but not in large bodies. Indeed, our infant Government seemed overwhelmed with care and anxiety to meet the storm that was rapidly approaching, and could scarcely attend to the wants of her little army. It is true the various State arsenals contained more arms than were necessary for the seventy-five thousand men called upon-thanks to the statesmanlike foresight of our leaders, and the cooperation of Governor Floyd, ex-Minister of War under Buchanan-yet their quality and effectiveness were very indifferent indeed, while the ammunition found at hand on the outbreak proved to have been made up of the very worst description of powder; so much so, that after the second discharge our muskets were so dirty as to become almost unserviceable. The quartermaster's and commissary departments, also, were in great confusion, and the service far from efficient. Although the country abounded in corn-meal, ba
Jones James (search for this): chapter 3
ms and bugles at tattoo could be scarcely heard in the. unearthly din. Regiments on the hills, in. the woods, in the plain, and from every direction, caught up the shout, and for one full hour the whole scene far and wide was naught but noisy merriment and excitement. The ceremony of roll-call that night was certainly a ridiculous farce: the orderly was laughed at, and coughed at; a general buzz and suppressed laughter ran along the whole company line, and the usual calls for Smith John, Jones James, were received with derisive cheers, as if it were possible any one could be absent on so momentous and joyful an occasion. Tents were soon struck, four days rations were quickly cooked, and all the camp equipage expeditiously packed and carried down to the railroad station and properly guarded. Many journeys were necessary to transfer all our extra baggage to the depot, and from the alacrity of the men in proffering their services to carry things, and the cloudy, mystified appearanc
Smith John (search for this): chapter 3
that the drums and bugles at tattoo could be scarcely heard in the. unearthly din. Regiments on the hills, in. the woods, in the plain, and from every direction, caught up the shout, and for one full hour the whole scene far and wide was naught but noisy merriment and excitement. The ceremony of roll-call that night was certainly a ridiculous farce: the orderly was laughed at, and coughed at; a general buzz and suppressed laughter ran along the whole company line, and the usual calls for Smith John, Jones James, were received with derisive cheers, as if it were possible any one could be absent on so momentous and joyful an occasion. Tents were soon struck, four days rations were quickly cooked, and all the camp equipage expeditiously packed and carried down to the railroad station and properly guarded. Many journeys were necessary to transfer all our extra baggage to the depot, and from the alacrity of the men in proffering their services to carry things, and the cloudy, mystifi
e outbreak proved to have been made up of the very worst description of powder; so much so, that after the second discharge our muskets were so dirty as to become almost unserviceable. The quartermaster's and commissary departments, also, were in great confusion, and the service far from efficient. Although the country abounded in corn-meal, bacon, flour, etc., it was evident our stores could not last for ever, as the two last-named articles were chiefly (and perhaps solely) to be found North. We were rich in cotton, sugar, tobacco, rice, hemp, etc., but these were not commissary stores, or absolute necessaries, and as we did not produce any other, and were not in any sense a manufacturing people, we found the whole North ridiculing us and our preparations for conquering our independence. Indeed, their common taunt was, How can you live without us? Why, we will starve you into submission. At the outset, however, President Davis and his military advisers had foreseen, and pro
ws troops ordered to Virginia Rejoicings in the camp Hospitalities on the road patriotism of the women Northern sympathies in east Tennessee camp at Lynchburgh by rail to Manassas station. April having passed, and the intentions of General Scott not being as yet developed, it was conjectured that operations might commence simultaneously at different points. Troops were therefore sent to Union City, (Kentucky,) near Cairo, on the Mississippi, and to Columbus, (Kentucky,) on the same ound a thousand and one excuses for not bearing arms for the country that had enriched them, and in which perchance they had been born. This is true of Hollanders generally, and of Dutch Jews almost universally. It becoming apparent that General Scott's main line of advance and attack would be from Washington towards the Confederate capital of Richmond, the majority of our forces were directed to a point mid-way between both places. From our camp ground we daily saw trains passing onwards
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
and stores Practices of the Jews troops ordered to Virginia Rejoicings in the camp Hospitalities on the road patriotism of the women Northern sympathies in east Tennessee camp at Lynchburgh by rail to Manassas station. April having passed, and the intentions of General Scott not being as yet developed, it was conjectured that operations might commence simultaneously at different points. Troops were therefore sent to Union City, (Kentucky,) near Cairo, on the Mississippi, and to Columbus, (Kentucky,) on the same river; the latter place being the last station of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and of great importance in many ways. Troops were also hurriedly despatched to Western Virginia, but not in large bodies. Indeed, our infant Government seemed overwhelmed with care and anxiety to meet the storm that was rapidly approaching, and could scarcely attend to the wants of her little army. It is true the various State arsenals contained more arms than were necessary for the s
Lynchburgh (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
he Jews troops ordered to Virginia Rejoicings in the camp Hospitalities on the road patriotism of the women Northern sympathies in east Tennessee camp at Lynchburgh by rail to Manassas station. April having passed, and the intentions of General Scott not being as yet developed, it was conjectured that operations might come few miscreants had meditated our total destruction by obstructions on the rails, and attempts to fire bridges across the streams. At length, on arriving at Lynchburgh, (Virginia,)we thought our travels were at an end, for now we were on the sacred soil of the first rebel (!), the immortal Washington: but still our troubles anwas next to an impossibility for any one to elude them, or obtain permission to visit the city, basking in the sunlight at the foot of the hill. The thought of Lynchburgh tobacco tempted many to make large investments for the campaign; but in this we committed grave mistakes, for we were compelled to carry every pound of freight
Union City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ynchburgh by rail to Manassas station. April having passed, and the intentions of General Scott not being as yet developed, it was conjectured that operations might commence simultaneously at different points. Troops were therefore sent to Union City, (Kentucky,) near Cairo, on the Mississippi, and to Columbus, (Kentucky,) on the same river; the latter place being the last station of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and of great importance in many ways. Troops were also hurriedly despatched tng and yelling to us as they passed swiftly onward. The Washington artillery (four companies) from New-Orleans had gone the day before, and we almost envied them their trip to Richmond. We were much afraid the War Department would order us to Union City; but one evening as we sat chatting round our camp fires, the agreeable order was given-Strike tents! Pack up for Virginia, boys! Such rejoicing, such confusion, such hilarity, and obstreperous behavior as characterized our camps on the rec
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