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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
— who own plantations and make splendid crops of sugar and cotton. In fact, the free boys of New-Orleans raised a battalion fifteen hundred strong, and offered themselves for service to Davis, but were refused! Their flag had for motto: We never surrender. Think you one could prevail upon any of those fellows to leave home? Freedom, however, does them no good — they hate all the vices, but few virtues of the white, and are rather a nuisance to communities than otherwise. The free State of Illinois forbids negroes of any stamp to reside there, under heavy penalties. State Legislatures have enacted laws forbidding free darkies to remain in many of the cotton States, for their habits are injurious to the morals of those in servitude. But,how do they evade it? Why, rather than leave, and live in free States, ninety-nine out of every hundred bind themselves to masters again for form's sake, and thus remain with us. If the negro is really so unhappy as Northern orators proclaim, wh
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
n times more frequently than masters: what greater opportunities could be presented for escape? They are roaming in and out of the lines at all times, tramping over every acre of country daily, and I have not heard of more than six instances of runaways in our whole brigade, which has a cooking and washing corps of negroes at least one hundred and fifty strong! Bostick lost one in a singular manner. The boy was sick, and his kind, brave old master gave Joe a pass to go to his mistress in Georgia--a thousand miles away-together with fifty dollars for his expenses, and fifty dollars pocket-money-all in gold. Joe went safely as far as Knoxville, when some of Parson Brownlow's disciples persuaded him to leave the cars, and stay in East-Tennessee as a free man . That same night some of these Abolitionists waylaid the free man Joe, their recognized colored brother, robbed him, and then beat his skull in pieces! Bostick, the slaveholder! --that term which horrifies Northern free-thin
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
he Yankee Government would soon have seized upon it for our destruction or chastisement. There is no likelihood of such an event, however. I know districts in Mississippi where there are not more than one or two old white men to a slave population of from three to five thousand. In fact, all our plantations are conducted by the es it that officers cannot keep them from the front? You know as well as I, that Dave behaved gallantly at Manassas, and received his free papers from the State of Mississippi-passed in full legislative style-his price being paid to the owner by the State treasurer; but what did Dave do? He still keeps to his old master as befora ball, and realizing one thousand dollars, handed it over for de boys in Varginny! --for us their inhuman masters, as Northern cant will have it. Not only in Mississippi, but the colored folks of every town in the South have given balls, parties, and fairs, for our benefit, and sent thousands of dollars, clothes, blankets, shoes
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
now you've got 'em; give 'em goss! show 'em a taste of ole Alabamy! etc. The person who saw Uncle Pompey, added Jenkins, was wounded, and sat behind a tree, but said, although his hurt was extremely painful, the eloquence, rage, and impetuosity of Pomp, as he loaded and fired rapidly, was so ludicrous, being an incoherent jumble of oaths, snatches of Scripture, and prayers, that the tears ran down his cheeks, and he burst out into a roar of laughter. Among the incidents of battle near Richmond, the following amusing scene is said to have occurred near the Mechanicsville road. The Eighth and Ninth Georgia were ordered out to repel the enemy, when, upon the men falling in, one of the Ninth stepped from the ranks and told the captain, he wasn't able to face the music. You are scared, said the captain; lay down your gun and accoutrements, and retire, sir. The chicken-hearted gentleman did so, when shortly afterwards there stepped forward a good-looking darkey, named Westley, well
Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
reputation of a saint among the colored boys of the brigade; and as he could read the Bible, and was given to preaching, he invariably assembled the darkeys on Sunday afternoon, and held meetings in the woods. He used to lecture them unmercifully, but could not keep them from singing and dancing after tattoo. Uncle Pompey, as he was called, was an excellent servant, and an admirable cook, and went on from day to day singing hymns among his pots round the camp-fire, until the battle of Seven Pines opened, when the regiment moved up to the front, and was soon engaged. “Uncle Pompey, contrary to orders, persisted in going also, but was met by another darkey, who asked: Whar's you gwine, uncle Pomp? You isn't gwine up dar to have all de har scorched off yer head, is you? Uncle Pompey still persisted in advancing, and shouldering a rifle, soon overtook his regiment. De Lor‘ hab marcy on us all, boys! here dey comes agin! take car, massa, and hole your rifle square, as I showed
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
treated and has enough to spend. Besides, these fellows not only cook for us, but hire themselves out to different messes, and what with charging the poor boys ten cents each for washing a pair of socks or a handkerchief, bartering, buying whiskey at five dollars per gallon, and retailing it at fifty cents each drink of one eighth pint, they are making lots of money, and frequently loan it out at heavy interest. “I received a letter a few days ago which informed me that the darkeys of Vicksburgh gave a ball, and realizing one thousand dollars, handed it over for de boys in Varginny! --for us their inhuman masters, as Northern cant will have it. Not only in Mississippi, but the colored folks of every town in the South have given balls, parties, and fairs, for our benefit, and sent thousands of dollars, clothes, blankets, shoes, etc., for young massa and de boys. In truth, our servants feel as much pride in this holy war as we do, and are ever ready, as we have frequently seen, t
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
, tramping over every acre of country daily, and I have not heard of more than six instances of runaways in our whole brigade, which has a cooking and washing corps of negroes at least one hundred and fifty strong! Bostick lost one in a singular manner. The boy was sick, and his kind, brave old master gave Joe a pass to go to his mistress in Georgia--a thousand miles away-together with fifty dollars for his expenses, and fifty dollars pocket-money-all in gold. Joe went safely as far as Knoxville, when some of Parson Brownlow's disciples persuaded him to leave the cars, and stay in East-Tennessee as a free man . That same night some of these Abolitionists waylaid the free man Joe, their recognized colored brother, robbed him, and then beat his skull in pieces! Bostick, the slaveholder! --that term which horrifies Northern free-thinkers-paid the best detectives he could procure, to find-heavily fee'd the ablest counsel to prosecute, if found-and finally offered a reward of five t
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
lars for the arrest of the murderers of his slave-boy Joe Another boy ran away from our regiment, and crossed over to the enemy; he found how things were, and returned across the river to Dixie again, under a shower of bullets. These are not solitary instances. Examples as much to the point as these might be cited by all. Major Walton, Chief of the Washington (New-Orleans) Artillery Corps, had a boy who ran away, said another, and the rogue informed the enemy how things stood at Centreville during the winter months of 1861 and 1862. His description of our batteries was pretty accurate as to name and number, but when he attempted to describe their positions and bearings, his, head was at fault. I know an instance of a boy who ran from the Eighteenth Mississippi, just before Manassas, July, 1861. He was recaptured during the engagement; for the Yankees putting him in the front, together with other run-aways, made him very uneasy, so he slipped into our lines again, but was
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
several wealthy darkeys in Louisiana-much richer by far than I am — who own plantations and make splendid crops of sugar and cotton. In fact, the free boys of New-Orleans raised a battalion fifteen hundred strong, and offered themselves for service to Davis, but were refused! Their flag had for motto: We never surrender. Think , and pretended to be dead when our black boys found them on the battle-field. This was written before the negro regiments were raised under General Banks at New-Orleans. Do you think Nick out there considers a Northern darkey his equal? Tell him so — you could not insult him more grossly than to insinuate such a thing! Ther shower of bullets. These are not solitary instances. Examples as much to the point as these might be cited by all. Major Walton, Chief of the Washington (New-Orleans) Artillery Corps, had a boy who ran away, said another, and the rogue informed the enemy how things stood at Centreville during the winter months of 1861 an
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 30
or a three hundred dollar bill, has made fifteen hundred dollars this past year, and now does business with a horse and cart, charging his master five prices for every thing, the old rogue! “What the Federals will do with the darkeys is difficult to say. When peace is declared they will nearly all return home; some of them have already escaped from the tender mercies of the Yankee, and are in Dixie once again, fully determined to travel away no more. You know Pete? Well, when I was in Canada, the little fool took up a notion that he must be free, and accordingly ran off. I did not trouble myself about him, but hired a white boy to wait on me, and found it much more inexpensive. When I was about to return South again, up turns the rogue Pete, and with tears in his eyes begged me to take him home! he had spent all his money, and found it difficult to live as a free man. I know several wealthy darkeys in Louisiana-much richer by far than I am — who own plantations and make splen
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