hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 494 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 418 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 336 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 210 2 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 204 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
John Pope 189 1 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 152 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 132 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

Found 177 total hits in 35 results.

1 2 3 4
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 31
the Pike, and were positively informed that Shields and Fremont were already there. These commanders, however, had not formed a junction, but were in sight of each other — the first-named on the east, and the latter on the west side of the Shenandoah River, which at this point is not very wide. So long as they had not joined their forces Jackson cared but little, feeling confident of soundly thrashing either of them; indeed, he would not have hesitated to attack both had they stopped his marcg and chivalry! Having retreated during the night, we halted two miles from the village of Port Republic, and watched a further development of the enemy's plans. Shields's division was on the east, and Fremont's on the west side of the Shenandoah River, nearly parallel, and it seemed the latter was desirous of attacking Jackson while Shields should cross the bridge at Port Republic and get in the rear: the commanders were in sight of each other, and not more than two miles apart. But if t
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ttle of cross Keys Ashby killed battle of Port Republic end of the Valley campaign, and rout of the enemy. Charlottesville, June 20th, 1862. Dear friend: In my last I informed you that before Jackson left Page Valley to attack Banks's rrkness of the night made still darker the regions of the mind. He now sleeps in the University Burying-Ground, near Charlottesville. The rest of our march was a melancholy one. We had beaten back the enemy, it is true; but not a thousand such suce of the river. His entire force having crossed about midnight, and his baggage-train being safe on its way towards Charlottesville, Jackson destroyed the bridge, and prepared his men for the battle of Port Republic, which was to take place early i Where we are marching to now, I cannot form the least idea, but as we move eastward, it is whispered that we go to Charlottesville to recruit, and after being heavily reenforced, may reenter the Valley again, and perhaps push for Maryland. All at
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
up his men, and remained beneath their fire, and waited for reenforcements from Jackson. We took forty-four prisoners-among them the colonel commanding the brigade of cavalry. The infantry having arrived, Generals Ashby, Ewell, and Stewart (of Maryland) led them to the fight. Here Ashby's gallantry could not have been excelled. Having led the First Maryland regiment in a charge, which sent the enemy flying from that quarter, he sought the Fifty-eighth Virginia, and still between the two firend they second them without a murmur. Where we are marching to now, I cannot form the least idea, but as we move eastward, it is whispered that we go to Charlottesville to recruit, and after being heavily reenforced, may reenter the Valley again, and perhaps push for Maryland. All at present is profound mystery, but I am sincerely rejoiced at the prospect of some little rest. A messenger starts to-night across country for Richmond, and I hurriedly close to send by him. Yours, Ashton.
Page Valley (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
y Shields and Fremont battle of cross Keys Ashby killed battle of Port Republic end of the Valley campaign, and rout of the enemy. Charlottesville, June 20th, 1862. Dear friend: In my last I informed you that before Jackson left Page Valley to attack Banks's rear in the Shenandoah, Shields had already left, and gone eastwards across the Blue Ridge, towards Fredericksburgh; also, that Fremont was across the Alleghanies, with Milroy and Blenker, too distant to afford Banks any suppg the muddy roads as best we might, Ashby and his cavalry in the rear skirmishing and bridge-burning, we endeavored to reach Mount Jackson, that point being considered a place of safety. It was surmised by some that Shields might push through Page Valley and appear in front, while Fremont followed up the rear; and this he might have done, had he been daring enough to attempt it. Still marching as fast as possible, our wearied force at last reached the vicinity of a small village called Edinbur
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ff his retreat. We had not lain idle more than a week, when it became known that both those commanders had turned the heads of their respective columns towards Strasburgh, fifty miles to our rear, and were rapidly marching to that point, thinking that, should they reach there in time, we might be compelled to accept battle from ty on his movements, and he did so with more than usual expedition. Having destroyed all the baggage that could not be transported, he turned his column towards Strasburgh, and commenced a backward movement in the last days of May. The roads were in fair condition, and marching very rapidly, we drew near the town on the third day. Little rest was allowed, and all pushed forward with remarkable celerity. As we approached Strasburgh, our advance cavalry were opposed by the enemy on the Pike, and were positively informed that Shields and Fremont were already there. These commanders, however, had not formed a junction, but were in sight of each other —
Edinburgh (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 31
long the muddy roads as best we might, Ashby and his cavalry in the rear skirmishing and bridge-burning, we endeavored to reach Mount Jackson, that point being considered a place of safety. It was surmised by some that Shields might push through Page Valley and appear in front, while Fremont followed up the rear; and this he might have done, had he been daring enough to attempt it. Still marching as fast as possible, our wearied force at last reached the vicinity of a small village called Edinburgh, and, crossing the Shenandoah, burned the bridge. We were now not far from Mount Jackson; but the army was so fatigued with its long march over a muddy, rough, and hilly country, that a halt was absolutely necessary. Fremont's pursuit was completely checked by the destruction of the bridge; and, as a further precaution, while the infantry were resting several miles beyond, Ashby's cavalry watched the banks. The Federals were greatly disappointed to find the bridge gone, but manfully
Mount Jackson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
they were, and perfectly fresh, they would leave nothing undone to overtake and punish us, if they could. Dashing along the muddy roads as best we might, Ashby and his cavalry in the rear skirmishing and bridge-burning, we endeavored to reach Mount Jackson, that point being considered a place of safety. It was surmised by some that Shields might push through Page Valley and appear in front, while Fremont followed up the rear; and this he might have done, had he been daring enough to attempt it. Still marching as fast as possible, our wearied force at last reached the vicinity of a small village called Edinburgh, and, crossing the Shenandoah, burned the bridge. We were now not far from Mount Jackson; but the army was so fatigued with its long march over a muddy, rough, and hilly country, that a halt was absolutely necessary. Fremont's pursuit was completely checked by the destruction of the bridge; and, as a further precaution, while the infantry were resting several miles beyond,
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
out parallel, but though the majority think that these movements were all his own, it may not be so. He was constantly in receipt of orders from Lee, and he faithfully obeyed them. No man in the army is half so obedient as old Stonewall, or so determined to be obeyed; the result is, that no army has shown greater endurance, marched farther, fought more frequently, suffered less, or done half the work that has fallen to our lot. Our men seem to know intuitively the designs of their commanders, and they second them without a murmur. Where we are marching to now, I cannot form the least idea, but as we move eastward, it is whispered that we go to Charlottesville to recruit, and after being heavily reenforced, may reenter the Valley again, and perhaps push for Maryland. All at present is profound mystery, but I am sincerely rejoiced at the prospect of some little rest. A messenger starts to-night across country for Richmond, and I hurriedly close to send by him. Yours, Ashton.
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
declared that he was a statesman without a speech, a soldier without a battle, and a millionaire with nary red. He could only abbreviate the description by calling him an unmitigated humbug. His staff usually comprised nearly sixty officers. When night closed in we found that our killed and wounded amounted to three hundred, and that of the enemy to one thousand, not counting the fight of Cross Keys, where our loss was three hundred, and that of Fremont five hundred. Thus ended Jackson's memorable campaign in the Valley, a chapter in history which is without parallel, but though the majority think that these movements were all his own, it may not be so. He was constantly in receipt of orders from Lee, and he faithfully obeyed them. No man in the army is half so obedient as old Stonewall, or so determined to be obeyed; the result is, that no army has shown greater endurance, marched farther, fought more frequently, suffered less, or done half the work that has fallen to
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
, fired every load from his three pistols, and brought every thing away safely.) Soon we were moving long the road to Port Republic, the enemy pressing closely. Ashby's eagle eye was upon them, as watching for an excuse to give them battle. An excountless acts of daring and chivalry! Having retreated during the night, we halted two miles from the village of Port Republic, and watched a further development of the enemy's plans. Shields's division was on the east, and Fremont's on the we nearly parallel, and it seemed the latter was desirous of attacking Jackson while Shields should cross the bridge at Port Republic and get in the rear: the commanders were in sight of each other, and not more than two miles apart. But if they imaghad we been less active, Shields would have advanced up the east bank of the river, and, having secured the bridge at Port Republic, would have crossed over, and got in front. It was fortunate, therefore, that Jackson had been able to out-race them
1 2 3 4