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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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e hospitals and depots, but had not time to destroy them, so decamped, leaving many sick and wounded behind. But of all the fighting I think that at Frazier's Farm was the most desperate, said Dobbs, drinking again, and getting steam up. Oh! You simply think so, Major, said some one, laughing, because hard marched and fatigued when you arrived there. Tink so? answered Dobbs indignantly. But I know so. Just fancy, travelling over twenty-five miles along sandy, dusty roads, under a July sun, and coming up with the enemy about sundown, and they formed on a rising ground ready for business? Had I been Hill, I should have deferred matters until morning. Yes, and in the morning they would have vanished. Well, it was as well as it was, continued Dobbs. We gave them a sound thrashing, but the villains fought obstinately enough, goodness knows! The position, as you know, was assailable only on one side, and as the road was an ascent, their artillery ploughed our advance u
d Lieutenant, First United States Artillery, first July, 1847, that being the time of his entering the service. We find him placed First Lieutenant, First Artillery, fourth September, 1851. He was among the first officers who left the old army and offered their services to the South, and was always looked upon as a promising officer; the part he has played in the present struggle for independence stamps him as a young man of real genius. He greatly distinguished himself at Manassas, twenty-first July, Mechanicsville, Gaines's Mills, etc. He is now a Major-General. Jackson was hovering in their rear, Jackson did it.-It is very easy, now that the affair is over, to perceive the cause of McClellan's recent reverse. At the last moment, when least expected, and equally to the surprise, we have no doubt, of President Lincoln, Secretary Stanton, and General McClellan himself, Stonewall Jackson rushed from the Valley of the Shenandoah, attacked our right wing, forced it back, and got
dents of the struggle the Federal army massed round the Heights of Berkeley night attack by our artillery, and fearful destruction subsequent demonstration of McClellan General Pope and other Northern commanders rising in favor. When it became known beyond all doubt that McClellan was safe, and strongly posted on the river bluffs at Berkeley, the pursuit was discontinued, his position being one that was peculiarly well adapted for defence. This had been proved during the Revolution of 1776, and in the year 1812, when British forces had occupied the same spot. Lee, therefore, did not seem at all inclined to push matters to an extremity, but disposed his divisions to prevent any advance of the enemy, and to precipitate an engagement should they endeavor to leave the position they had gained and attempt to retreat. While our army under these circumstances was resting, to recover from its recent fatigue, business called me from camp to Richmond. I did not observe signs of any
the Federal army massed round the Heights of Berkeley night attack by our artillery, and fearful destruction subsequent demonstration of McClellan General Pope and other Northern commanders rising in favor. When it became known beyond all doubt that McClellan was safe, and strongly posted on the river bluffs at Berkeley, the pursuit was discontinued, his position being one that was peculiarly well adapted for defence. This had been proved during the Revolution of 1776, and in the year 1812, when British forces had occupied the same spot. Lee, therefore, did not seem at all inclined to push matters to an extremity, but disposed his divisions to prevent any advance of the enemy, and to precipitate an engagement should they endeavor to leave the position they had gained and attempt to retreat. While our army under these circumstances was resting, to recover from its recent fatigue, business called me from camp to Richmond. I did not observe signs of any jubilation over our s
July 1st, 1832 AD (search for this): chapter 39
are before us; you cannot miss them! Steady! Forward, guide centre, march and off they went up the hill, yelling and firing like madmen. Brigadier-General Daniel P. Whiting is a native of New-York, about fifty years of age, small in stature, thin, wiry, and active, an excellent officer in any department, and, though always in the infantry, proved himself an admirable engineer, by fortifying Harper's Ferry, in May, 1861. He entered the old service Second Lieutenant Second Infantry, July first, 1832; was Brevet Major April eighteenth, 1847; and full Major when hostilities commenced. He was assigned to Johnston's command in the Shenandoah Valley, May, 1861, as chief engineer there-Johnston on many occasions testifying to his merit and industry. In the absence of General Gustavus Smith, Whiting always commanded the division, and proved himself an officer of great ability at Seven Pines, where he commanded the left attack. At the battle of Gaines's Mills he won immortal honor by th
April 18th, 1847 AD (search for this): chapter 39
Steady! Forward, guide centre, march and off they went up the hill, yelling and firing like madmen. Brigadier-General Daniel P. Whiting is a native of New-York, about fifty years of age, small in stature, thin, wiry, and active, an excellent officer in any department, and, though always in the infantry, proved himself an admirable engineer, by fortifying Harper's Ferry, in May, 1861. He entered the old service Second Lieutenant Second Infantry, July first, 1832; was Brevet Major April eighteenth, 1847; and full Major when hostilities commenced. He was assigned to Johnston's command in the Shenandoah Valley, May, 1861, as chief engineer there-Johnston on many occasions testifying to his merit and industry. In the absence of General Gustavus Smith, Whiting always commanded the division, and proved himself an officer of great ability at Seven Pines, where he commanded the left attack. At the battle of Gaines's Mills he won immortal honor by the skilful manner of handling his divis
July 1st, 1847 AD (search for this): chapter 39
d chagrin. True, said another, it was a master-stroke of Lee; and when Branch at Brooke Bridge and Hill at Meadow Bridge assailed in front, the game was up with their right wing, for these, uncovering Mechanicsville Bridge, allowed Longstreet and D. H. Hill to cross likewise. ‘The attack of Ambrose Hill was a spirited affair, and beautifully conducted. Ambrose P. Hill is a Virginian; graduated at West-Point, and was brevet Second Lieutenant, First United States Artillery, first July, 1847, that being the time of his entering the service. We find him placed First Lieutenant, First Artillery, fourth September, 1851. He was among the first officers who left the old army and offered their services to the South, and was always looked upon as a promising officer; the part he has played in the present struggle for independence stamps him as a young man of real genius. He greatly distinguished himself at Manassas, twenty-first July, Mechanicsville, Gaines's Mills, etc. He is
September 4th, 1851 AD (search for this): chapter 39
dge assailed in front, the game was up with their right wing, for these, uncovering Mechanicsville Bridge, allowed Longstreet and D. H. Hill to cross likewise. ‘The attack of Ambrose Hill was a spirited affair, and beautifully conducted. Ambrose P. Hill is a Virginian; graduated at West-Point, and was brevet Second Lieutenant, First United States Artillery, first July, 1847, that being the time of his entering the service. We find him placed First Lieutenant, First Artillery, fourth September, 1851. He was among the first officers who left the old army and offered their services to the South, and was always looked upon as a promising officer; the part he has played in the present struggle for independence stamps him as a young man of real genius. He greatly distinguished himself at Manassas, twenty-first July, Mechanicsville, Gaines's Mills, etc. He is now a Major-General. Jackson was hovering in their rear, Jackson did it.-It is very easy, now that the affair is over, to
May, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 39
ting is a native of New-York, about fifty years of age, small in stature, thin, wiry, and active, an excellent officer in any department, and, though always in the infantry, proved himself an admirable engineer, by fortifying Harper's Ferry, in May, 1861. He entered the old service Second Lieutenant Second Infantry, July first, 1832; was Brevet Major April eighteenth, 1847; and full Major when hostilities commenced. He was assigned to Johnston's command in the Shenandoah Valley, May, 1861, asMay, 1861, as chief engineer there-Johnston on many occasions testifying to his merit and industry. In the absence of General Gustavus Smith, Whiting always commanded the division, and proved himself an officer of great ability at Seven Pines, where he commanded the left attack. At the battle of Gaines's Mills he won immortal honor by the skilful manner of handling his division; and to cheer on the men sprang to the front on foot, cap in hand, fighting his way up-hill, through the timber, while his own br
James J. Archer (search for this): chapter 39
s were on foot, you know, so that it required much running about to keep the brigade in order; but, although Featherstone's men were supposed to be a reserve of the division in that action, they became so restive that he advanced up the centre, and arrived at the top of the hill sooner than the rest. Had he moved out of the woods alone his destruction was inevitable-for the artillery of the enemy was numerous and powerful. It is said that the sight of Wilcox, Featherstone, Pryor, Whiting, Archer, Hood, and others advancing afoot, sword in hand, cheering on their commands through the woods and up the hill, was most inspiriting: the men cheered vociferously, and would have followed such commanders anywhere. Come on, boys! said little Whiting, who, though commanding a division, would lead his old brigade to the charge- Come on, boys! said he in front, waving his cap and sword- quick, is the word! Here they are before us; you cannot miss them! Steady! Forward, guide centre, mar
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