hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 494 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 418 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 336 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 210 2 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 204 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
John Pope 189 1 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 152 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 132 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

Found 257 total hits in 72 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 4
this place. Trains run there night and day. See yonder said my companion, pointing towards Centreville. They are working the telegraph! See them repeating the signals on yonder hill? Wait a minute, and you'll perceive the answer given from Beauregard's quarters. In a few minutes, one of the men sitting around the large fire in front of the General's quarters, seized a long red fagot from the flames, and going to the north end of the house, began swaying it to the right and left, accordine, to relieve my agreeable companion; so, giving him another drink of brandy, I bade him good night, and picked my way back again to our cattle-cars, to sleep as best I could for the rest of the night. When morning came, we all thought that Beauregard and other generals would call and inspect or review us; but our vanity was not so flattered. We were marched some two miles past the station; our baggage was brought down by an engine and cars, and before we could well recover from a journey
John S. Marmaduke (search for this): chapter 4
movement upon that place, in order to crush the rebels the instant they stirred. At this critical moment, Price being sick and unable to attend to business, Colonel Marmaduke took command of our force, if a body such as I have described deserves the name. But their strength consisted in the fact that a pure patriotism had caused them to take the field. It was soon ascertained that Lyon was approaching up the Missouri with several thousand men and half-a-dozen field-pieces. Colonel Marmaduke Colonel John S. Marmaduke is a Missourian: entered the service as brevet Second Lieutenant First Infantry, July first, 1857; was Second Lieutenant Seventh InfantColonel John S. Marmaduke is a Missourian: entered the service as brevet Second Lieutenant First Infantry, July first, 1857; was Second Lieutenant Seventh Infantry, August first, 1857; joined the Missourians at Boonville, with rank of Colonel, and on account of services is now Brigadier-General, acting in the same State. was fearful of the disparity in force, and wished to retreat, but the men under Lieutenant-Colonel Brand were determined to fight When the enemy appeared, therefore, our
unting to a dozen. We then gave up the fight, and retired towards Cole Camp, where, it was said, a force of the enemy were stationed to intercept us; these were attacked during the night by Colonel Kane with a small body of rebels, and defeated, with a loss of more than two hundred men killed, one hundred taken, and five hundred stand of arms. This capture assisted in arming hundreds who were flocking to us on our line of march towards Warsaw, on the Osage River. Though pursued by Colonel Totten and a thousand cavalry, Governor Jackson safely reached Warsaw, where we rested, and began to look about us. Our case was desperate; we were but a few ill-armed men of all ages and all sizes, unaccustomed to military service, and less used to privations and sufferings. We had no tents, no commissary or quartermaster's stores, few wagons, and those of an inferior kind — in truth, we were a small band of patriots vastly in need of every thing but pluck. As the enemy were making disposit
the disparity in force, and wished to retreat, but the men under Lieutenant-Colonel Brand were determined to fight When the enemy appeared, therefore, our handful of volunteers drew up in battle array and confronted them, and within two hours killed and wounded more than two hundred, our loss not amounting to a dozen. We then gave up the fight, and retired towards Cole Camp, where, it was said, a force of the enemy were stationed to intercept us; these were attacked during the night by Colonel Kane with a small body of rebels, and defeated, with a loss of more than two hundred men killed, one hundred taken, and five hundred stand of arms. This capture assisted in arming hundreds who were flocking to us on our line of march towards Warsaw, on the Osage River. Though pursued by Colonel Totten and a thousand cavalry, Governor Jackson safely reached Warsaw, where we rested, and began to look about us. Our case was desperate; we were but a few ill-armed men of all ages and all size
Joe Johnston (search for this): chapter 4
the east, and with the Western Virginia and Ohio Railroads to the west. General Joe Johnston is at the Ferry with a small force guarding the passage; for if General with incessantly. Little could be gleaned regarding Federal movements. General Joe Johnston had evacuated Harper's Ferry, we knew, and the act was much censured by ubsequently named Stonewall by way of distinction) was second in command under Johnston, and guarded the Upper Potomac with great vigilance. It was evident the Federy towards Charlestown, (midway between Harper's Ferry and Winchester,) whither Johnston's main force had retired. While Johnston's and Patterson's forces were thus fJohnston's and Patterson's forces were thus facing each other near Charlestown things were unchanged at Manassas. Reports, indeed, were circulated daily regarding the enemy's movements, but nothing of consequenthere assembled did not muster more than twenty thousand men, and twenty guns; Johnston having ten thousand men and twenty guns with him in the Shenandoah Valley.
eral Joe Johnston is at the Ferry with a small force guarding the passage; for if General Patterson and his forty thousand men pour across from Maryland and Pennsylvania into the Shenandoah Valley, they can march on this place by the flank, while Scott moves down from Washington in our front. 'Tis fully sixty miles, however, from the Ferry here, and if we hadn't so many traitors and spies around at all points, night and day, our boys wouldn't be obliged to guard the Gap yonder this cold night,t. Pegram had been surprised and defeated by McClellan, at Rich Mountain in Western Virginia, (July twelfth,) and from reports of killed and wounded, it was very evident the Federals had no idea of amusing themselves by throwing snowballs at us. Scott began to push his outposts towards Fairfax Court-House, and sharp skirmishing was of daily occurrence; but with little damage to either side. We learned that our independent scouts around Alexandria caused much annoyance and loss by their unerri
Claiborne Jackson (search for this): chapter 4
son around Harper's Ferry forward movements of the enemy Jackson opens the Ball Colonel Maxey Gregg attacks the Northern t what point to expect his crossing no one could tell. Colonel Jackson (subsequently named Stonewall by way of distinction) wpart lying in ambush. When their advance had crossed, Colonel Jackson's force (about three thousand) assailed them vigorouslided punishment with the few troops under his command; Colonel Jackson, therefore, retreated slowly and orderly towards Charlfeeling in favor of our sister Southern States. Governor Claiborne Jackson, feeling that delays might prove dangerous, ordeLyon meditated seizing the capital at Jefferson City, Governor Jackson, in June, issued a call for fifty thousand volunteers1. He was immediately appointed Brigadier General by Governor Jackson, and has been present in almost every fight. The callugh pursued by Colonel Totten and a thousand cavalry, Governor Jackson safely reached Warsaw, where we rested, and began to
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 4
request, and answered the most simple interrogatories with great solemnity and caution. Our strength from such sources of information was put down at from seventy-five thousand to one hundred thousand; while the truth was, our whole army there assembled did not muster more than twenty thousand men, and twenty guns; Johnston having ten thousand men and twenty guns with him in the Shenandoah Valley. Daily reports now began to possess interest. Pegram had been surprised and defeated by McClellan, at Rich Mountain in Western Virginia, (July twelfth,) and from reports of killed and wounded, it was very evident the Federals had no idea of amusing themselves by throwing snowballs at us. Scott began to push his outposts towards Fairfax Court-House, and sharp skirmishing was of daily occurrence; but with little damage to either side. We learned that our independent scouts around Alexandria caused much annoyance and loss by their unerring aim; and judging by the exploits of some few of
July 12th (search for this): chapter 4
es with great solemnity and caution. Our strength from such sources of information was put down at from seventy-five thousand to one hundred thousand; while the truth was, our whole army there assembled did not muster more than twenty thousand men, and twenty guns; Johnston having ten thousand men and twenty guns with him in the Shenandoah Valley. Daily reports now began to possess interest. Pegram had been surprised and defeated by McClellan, at Rich Mountain in Western Virginia, (July twelfth,) and from reports of killed and wounded, it was very evident the Federals had no idea of amusing themselves by throwing snowballs at us. Scott began to push his outposts towards Fairfax Court-House, and sharp skirmishing was of daily occurrence; but with little damage to either side. We learned that our independent scouts around Alexandria caused much annoyance and loss by their unerring aim; and judging by the exploits of some few of those adventurous individuals who visited us in camp
July 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 4
of a fight; some, indeed, who were really sick had to be forced out of the ranks, so anxious were all to do their duty, and render service in our common cause. About this time I received the following letter from a friend in Missouri, descriptive of the battle of Carthage, and the uprising of the people in that State. It is inserted here as an authentic account of the incidents leading to the engagement, and of the rout of the Federal troops: Cowskin Prairie, McDonald Co., Missouri, July 8, 1861. Dear Tom: I suppose the heading of this letter will surprise you, for I am no longer in my comfortable office in the good city of St. Louis, but one of Price's rebels, camped in this out-of-the-way place, near the Indian nation. As you desire to know every thing regarding our movements, I will narrate things as they occurred since I last saw you. When the Border States found that a coercive policy was determined upon, Missouri was one of the first to oppose it. We had no arms, but w
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8