hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 494 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 418 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 336 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 210 2 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 204 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
John Pope 189 1 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 152 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 132 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

Found 320 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
nty miles south of Corinth, and the place selected for our stand an excellent one to protect the south branches of the Mobile and New-Orleans railroads. The season, as I have said, made it impossible for the enemy to follow, (it was the month of June,) so, finding a supply of good water, and eligible sites for fortifications, we settled down comfortably, and had no fear of consequences. You may imagine Halleck's chagrin on discovering our retreat! as might be expected, the whole North wasdered we could make but a feeble resistance. The country around was only a cotton district, short of agricultural supplies, and connected with the interior and main army at Tullahoma by a single track of railroad, much overworked and unsound. As June advanced, and the rivers began to rise, the smoke of numerous gunboats above and below the city probed that the enemy were busy reconnoitring, and slowly approaching their object. Foundries and workshops were kept busy night and day; timber was
s strong, and would not be diverted. Hundreds of men, both whites and blacks, sank and died under the labor of cutting this canal, before the attempt was discontinued. And still the bombardment progressed. Thousands of shell, round shot, and other missiles were hurled at our devoted city; but, strange to say, except in some half-dozen instances, I know not one house which was more than slightly injured. The enemy, on the other hand, suffered much from their very inaction. The heats of July and the fever of August told fearfully upon their unacclimated troops, cooped up in their ships amid smoke and heat, and the deathly night-vapors of the land and water. Though suffering extremely in every way, they were farther from realizing their hopes than ever. It was computed they had at anchor more than twenty gunboats playing on the city, together with a land force of several thousand men, and scores of transports and flats. Ordnance officers affirmed that they had fired more than t
d at our devoted city; but, strange to say, except in some half-dozen instances, I know not one house which was more than slightly injured. The enemy, on the other hand, suffered much from their very inaction. The heats of July and the fever of August told fearfully upon their unacclimated troops, cooped up in their ships amid smoke and heat, and the deathly night-vapors of the land and water. Though suffering extremely in every way, they were farther from realizing their hopes than ever. Itre scattered around the peninsula, where every house was converted into an hospital. The commodores were nonplussed; and as their large fleets lay at anchor on the rippleless copper-colored river, with a cloudless sky, under the scorching sun of August, without the echo of a voice, without the motion of a leaf, or the flapping of ensigns from a breath of air, the cries of sand-cranes flying to and fro reminded one of some river of death, with hospitals for ships and spectres for crews. But
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 40
es intrench magnitude of the Federal works Beauregard suddenly retreats to Tullahoma policy of hi not follow part of our force detached from Beauregard, and, under command of Van Dorn, sent to deferformed that difficult task. General, said Beauregard, riding up with his staff, we must retreat; ep open the railroad traffic with the South, Beauregard would not have held the place five minutes, l force and the tremendous odds against us, Beauregard put a bold face upon matters; frequently marf the Mobile and Columbus road; thus leaving Beauregard in possession of but one line to the South, road. This intention was early perceived by Beauregard, who moved counter to the design, without weccount for which it is necessary to add that Beauregard had been quietly withdrawing from Corinth fotreat from Manassas leads me to believe that Beauregard was desirous of emulating your commander; thy, and it is said that the War Office blames Beauregard for allowing himself to be driven to any suc[1 more...]
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 40
the first and second day; of the first day's victory, of Albert Sydney Johnston's death; and of our reverse and retreat on the second day, before the combined armies of Buell and Grant. I also informed you that the retreat was covered by General Breckinridge, with his Kentuckians, and of the admirable manner in which he performed that difficult task. General, said Beauregard, riding up with his staff, we must retreat; we cannot maintain an unequal contest against such odds of fresh troops. The command of the rear-guard is given to you. This retreat must not be a rout — if it costs your last man, it must not be so! The army was withdrawn from the field as if in review, and Breckinridge covered the retreat so skilfully that the enemy halted, and did not pursue us more than a mile from the field. This was partly owing to their own exhausted condition; for next day the pursuit was taken up by General Pope, who captured several hundred of our sick and wounded in the timber. Many, dou
t eclipse the doings of the old Merrimac in Hampton Roads, which sank two large frigates and damaged the Monitor; but, after a little reflection, Commodore Lynch gave her in charge of a Mississippian, late of the old naval service, whose name was Brown. This officer grumbled much at the deficiencies apparent in the craft, and particularly at the engines, which were old and of doubtful capacity. Do you refuse to command, sir? ask Jed the little Commodore; if there is any thing you object but slowly on account of her defective engines, but fired deliberately and with telling effect, crippling the enemy at the first broadside, who ran their magnificent craft upon the bank, and struck colors at the moment our boat was passing. Captain Brown, finding his engines to be useless, depended solely upon the stream, and could not stop to take the splendid prize, for he knew many boats would soon appear to oppose his exit from the mouth of the Yazoo; so, although using more steam than co
Don Carlos Buell (search for this): chapter 40
Movements of Beauregard's army in Mississippi, after the battle of Shiloh our defences at Corinth General Halleck takes command of the combined armies of Buell and Grant, and follows on to Corinth both armies intrench magnitude of the Federal works Beauregard suddenly retreats to Tullahoma policy of his retreat the First and second day; of the first day's victory, of Albert Sydney Johnston's death; and of our reverse and retreat on the second day, before the combined armies of Buell and Grant. I also informed you that the retreat was covered by General Breckinridge, with his Kentuckians, and of the admirable manner in which he performed that and a few Arkansians, the trans-Mississippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few days, we learned that the tremendous forces of Grant and Buell, combined under command of Halleck, were slowly advancing. It was reported that they swarmed over the country like locusts, eating or destroying every thing, carr
ma policy of his retreat the Federals do not follow part of our force detached from Beauregard, and, under command of Van Dorn, sent to defend Vicksburgh against the fleet of Commodore Farragut advancing up from the Gulf, and Commodore Foote's squh I was glad to hear that Price, with a division of Missourians, had crossed the Mississippi, and formed a junction with Van Dorn and a few Arkansians, the trans-Mississippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few days, we learnt that a land force would cooperate with the gunboats, our brigade was sent to assist in the defence of the stronghold. Van Dorn was appointed to command the post, and did every thing in his power to place the city in a good posture for defence. er securing all the letters and despatches of the fleet. I glean this from Headquarters; the telegram came an hour ago. Van Dorn says the enemy admit a great loss among them from various causes, and are afraid the Arkansas may run down to New-Orlean
d of Van Dorn, sent to defend Vicksburgh against the fleet of Commodore Farragut advancing up from the Gulf, and Commodore Foote's squadron ofve: We had scarcely arrived at Tullahoma ere it was known that Farragut's fleet from New-Orleans, and Foote's from the Upper Mississippi, ndant, asking for the surrender of Vicksburgh, in the name of Commodore Farragut, United States Navy. The answer was instant, Mississippians the bluffs. A day or two after an answer had been returned to Farragut, one of his iron-clads was signalled from below; and soon after apred by us off the Gulf Coast, and taken into New-Orleans; but when Farragut took that city, this, with some three or four other sea-vessels, aluff batteries were contending with most of the fleet, several of Farragut's squadron ran past, and opened with an awful roar upon the-Arkans noise was maintained on both sides, and it was once supposed that Farragut's boats would grapple with the Arkansas and take her; but such was
o defend Vicksburgh against the fleet of Commodore Farragut advancing up from the Gulf, and Commodore Foote's squadron of gunboats coming down the river from St. Louis building of the rebel ram Arkae had scarcely arrived at Tullahoma ere it was known that Farragut's fleet from New-Orleans, and Foote's from the Upper Mississippi, were approaching, to unite against the batteries at Vicksburgh — tnd on high grounds at the mouth of the Yazoo, a few miles above Vicksburgh, we could plainly see Foote's fleet of gunboats, rams, and transports steaming down towards us, and at evening descried the d rapidly and boldly towards us, evidently bent on running the gauntlet of our guns, and joining Foote's fleet, snugly anchored west of the peninsula, and screened from view by the woods. Coming wit, and, giving a parting broadside, was soon hid from view by the trees, and safely anchored with Foote's flotilla. It was now apparent that we could do but little with the enemy's iron-clads, for
1 2 3 4 5 6