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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
nds and fathers arrested if they dared to murmur; horses and negroes taken in large numbers; ladies were robbed of all their wearing apparel, except what they had on; in fine, every outrage was committed, and every excess indulged in that was ever heard of by the most savage and brutal soldiery towards a defenceless and alarmed population. All this was done by those who pretend to represent the United States Government. .... I know similar acts disgraced the same brigade when we occupied Bowling Green, (Kentucky,) but the matter was hushed up to save the credit of our army, hoping it would never occur again. The St. Louis (Missouri) Republican, a Federal journal, and the most responsible organ in the West, says: In Monroe County, Missouri, near the Salt River railway bridge, as Mr. Lasley and family were returning from church, together with a party of young ladies and gentlemen, who were visiting them at their countryhouse, they found their dwelling and grounds occupied by Federal
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ssissippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few days, we learned that the tremendous forces of Grant and Buell, combined under command of Halleck, were slowly advancing. It was reported that they swarmed over the country like locusts, eating or destroying every thing, carrying off property, capturing negroes, and impressing them into service. As a specimen of the behavior of Federal troops in the West and South, I subjoin the following from their own organs: The Louisville (Kentucky) Democrat, which for safety was printed over the Ohio River at New-Albany, thus speaks of their soldiery in Athens, Alabama: General Turchin said to his soldiers that he would shut his eyes for two hours, and let them loose upon the town and citizens of Athens — the very same citizens who, when all the rest of the State was disloyal, nailed the national colors to the highest pinnacle of their court-house cupola. These citizens, to a wonderful degree true to their allegiance, had
Monroe County, Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
as ever heard of by the most savage and brutal soldiery towards a defenceless and alarmed population. All this was done by those who pretend to represent the United States Government. .... I know similar acts disgraced the same brigade when we occupied Bowling Green, (Kentucky,) but the matter was hushed up to save the credit of our army, hoping it would never occur again. The St. Louis (Missouri) Republican, a Federal journal, and the most responsible organ in the West, says: In Monroe County, Missouri, near the Salt River railway bridge, as Mr. Lasley and family were returning from church, together with a party of young ladies and gentlemen, who were visiting them at their countryhouse, they found their dwelling and grounds occupied by Federal troops, who had been stationed at the bridge. Suspecting no harm, though finding the grounds guarded, they advanced towards their residence, when Mr. Lasley was ordered to get down and go to Palmyra. He replied, that they must permit him
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Chapter 39: Movements of Beauregard's army in Mississippi, after the battle of Shiloh our defences at Corinth General Halleck formed a junction with Van Dorn and a few Arkansians, the trans-Mississippi campaign being considered closed for some time. Within a few dageneralled the enemy, rendered them powerless to move, and saved Mississippi from the inroad of a large army, which would have followed him i that Farragut's fleet from New-Orleans, and Foote's from the Upper Mississippi, were approaching, to unite against the batteries at Vicksbur river, did good service as a depot and rendezvous for the trans-Mississippi States during the war, being the only safe crossing-place for uston, sugar, molasses, and other products, disjoin the east and west Mississippi States, and, having us fairly, on the flanks, could operate wi supported by some splendid troops from Louisiana, Kentucky, and Mississippi, who would rather fight than eat. The women seemed to have chan
New Albany (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
rned that the tremendous forces of Grant and Buell, combined under command of Halleck, were slowly advancing. It was reported that they swarmed over the country like locusts, eating or destroying every thing, carrying off property, capturing negroes, and impressing them into service. As a specimen of the behavior of Federal troops in the West and South, I subjoin the following from their own organs: The Louisville (Kentucky) Democrat, which for safety was printed over the Ohio River at New-Albany, thus speaks of their soldiery in Athens, Alabama: General Turchin said to his soldiers that he would shut his eyes for two hours, and let them loose upon the town and citizens of Athens — the very same citizens who, when all the rest of the State was disloyal, nailed the national colors to the highest pinnacle of their court-house cupola. These citizens, to a wonderful degree true to their allegiance, had their houses and stores broken open, and robbed of every thing valuable; and, what
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
icent rams and iron-clads watching for her at the mouth of the Yazoo, or drawn up in parallel lines to receive her when passing the channel of the great river. She was large, rough, strong, and ungainly-vulnerable in many places, and the top imperfectly covered; so that should a stray shell drop through the roof, her destruction was almost certain, as the magazine was somewhat exposed. Many were desirous of commanding, as it was hoped she might eclipse the doings of the old Merrimac in Hampton Roads, which sank two large frigates and damaged the Monitor; but, after a little reflection, Commodore Lynch gave her in charge of a Mississippian, late of the old naval service, whose name was Brown. This officer grumbled much at the deficiencies apparent in the craft, and particularly at the engines, which were old and of doubtful capacity. Do you refuse to command, sir? ask Jed the little Commodore; if there is any thing you object to in her, state it, and I will go myself-either yo
Halleck (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
d to advance slowly upon us, and having more or less completed a vast line of elaborate breastworks, began to manoeuvre on our right, so as to gain possession of the east branch of the Mobile and Columbus road; thus leaving Beauregard in possession of but one line to the South, namely, the south branch of the New-Orleans and Memphis Railroad. This intention was early perceived by Beauregard, who moved counter to the design, without weakening Corinth itself. The labor and pertinacity of Halleck were wonderful. Having to make roads as he advanced into the interior, he employed large bodies of men, and when trenches were opened before Corinth, his army had completed several fine military roads from the Tennessee River to his immediate front. By these roads ponderous guns and immense trains of supplies were drawn from his base of operations on that river, so that for a distance of thirty miles or more, ox, horse, and mule teams were unceasingly moving by night and day, to facilitat
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
d, under command of Van Dorn, sent to defend Vicksburgh against the fleet of Commodore Farragut advathe city in a good posture for defence. Vicksburgh, situated on the east bank of the river, didt bank of the river, for several miles above Vicksburgh, gradually rises higher than the common leveubject to overflows. The Mississippi, above Vicksburgh, runs west to east, and, suddenly bending, rour batteries! As will be seen at a glance, Vicksburgh was an all-important point to the enemy, whoat the mouth of the Yazoo, a few miles above Vicksburgh, we could plainly see Foote's fleet of gunbor, as sailors would say, lies broadside to --Vicksburgh, being about half a mile across; so that wersupply, in an out-of-the-way river, far from Vicksburgh, thirty miles from the nearest railroad stat inclined to try it again. The woods facing Vicksburgh were literally blown down by chance shots frks. Thus ended the first bombardment of Vicksburgh. I am sorry to say that not less than four [6 more...]
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Corinth both armies intrench magnitude of the Federal works Beauregard suddenly retreats to Tullahoma policy of his retreat the Federals do not follow part of our force detached from Beauregardch sacrifice of life and money, when early one morning our whole army quietly decamped towards Tullahoma, and ere the mists had risen were beyond sight or hearing! A few regiments were thrown outogether with two old locomotives, we lost scarcely any thing worth mentioning, and arrived at Tullahoma without adventures of any kind, save flying rumors from the rear, where General Pope was folloiture was enormous in amount. But to return to my narrative: We had scarcely arrived at Tullahoma ere it was known that Farragut's fleet from New-Orleans, and Foote's from the Upper Mississippton district, short of agricultural supplies, and connected with the interior and main army at Tullahoma by a single track of railroad, much overworked and unsound. As June advanced, and the rivers
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ts tributaries were floated down; woodmen were busy in the timber at various places, cutting down immense trees, the sound of whose fall, crashing in the forest, was like distant thunder, so that in less than a week a raft was formed in two parts, which, he made fast, would stand butting from all the rams in Lincolndom. Nor could the enemy fire it, for the timber was so green, or so perfectly saturated from months and years of exposure in the water, it might well defy all the turpentine North-Carolina could produce in a century to kindle a single stick of it. This necessary work having been speedily and well accomplished, Lynch and his officers razed one of the vessels, and began the formation of the ungainly Arkansas. Carpenters, wood-choppers, sawyers, blacksmiths, voluntarily gave a hand to expedite proceedings, an old engine was placed in her, and the work of plating commenced. But how were they to get a sufficient supply of plates, bolts, screws, and machinery, remote as they w
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