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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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August 9th (search for this): chapter 41
n their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mount Washington, Warrenton, and Manassas Junction; a heavy force was stationed on Pope's left, at or near Waterloo on the Rappahannock, while somewhat to the rear of Banks and Pope was McDowell's corps. It was concluded with reason that these various bodies would be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Saturday, August ninth.) During the night, pickets, in our extreme front, were popping away at each other occasionally, and early in the morning our advance was resumed, cautiously and slowly. As the country was admirably adapted for concealment, our strength and position were never truly ascertained by the enemy's cavalry outposts, so that although our cavalry on the right were enjoying a merry time with those of Pope, our artillery gradually approached Cedar Mountain, and took up a strong position o
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 41
y force, and with Washington nearly due north; Banks had massed his troops in a wooded plain near Cned on our part as to attract the attention of Banks himself, inland and farther up the stream. an. Our movements were evidently too rapid for Banks; indeed, no possible despatch could save him, ained something regarding the true position of Banks's army. A few of these adventurous spirits had be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the folback towards the mountain, it was evident that Banks was determined to push us hard, and begin the the broken character of the country. Clearly, Banks was ignorant of the existence of a flanking foeral brigades in which he had most confidence, Banks ordered them to charge the guns before mentioneveral pieces, and broke them in a moment. Banks was angry, and determined to force our positiondications. Perceiving that his old friend Banks was unwilling to leave the vicinity of the bat[8 more...]
n's forces south of the James River, and the threatened advance of Burnside from Suffolk and Norfolk, as if to form a junction and cooperate ws possible that conflicting opinions existed between McClellan and Burnside, as was also known to be the case between the first-named and Pope. Burnside was ambitious-he was considered a successful man, from his capture of Roanoke Island, and full of promise; McClellan had yet to wirs, and was now bullied by a brutal press for being unsuccessful. Burnside was politically allied to the Government; McClellan was not. BurnsBurnside was desirous of superseding McClellan in command of the Grand army, or what remained of it, while the latter was actuated by pure militaryf their forces might ensue, McClellan's desires were thwarted, and Burnside was ordered round to reenforce Pope. Finding that the expected reenforcement of Burnside was hopeless, McClellan withdrew his troops from the south side, and quietly prepared to leave the peninsula, whic
. His immediate object was to capture or displace some few pieces of artillery which, posted in the edge of a wood, caused much destruction among his advancing columns, which pieces also he foolishly imagined were unsupported. The infantry thus far had been hotly engaged on both sides, and it rather appeared as if ours were falling back. But this was a ruse. Gathering together several brigades in which he had most confidence, Banks ordered them to charge the guns before mentioned, and Crawford's brigade gallantly rushed forward in fulfilment of the order. Our gunners seeing the intended movement, slackened fire, and reserved their strength until the proper moment; while several regiments of infantry, in support, cocked their rifles and lay on their faces concealed in the timber. As soon as the attacking column had emerged into open ground and deployed, advancing with shouts to the charge, grape, canister, and shell assailed them from several pieces, and broke them in a moment.
No action or combat of importance, however, had occurred save in the neighborhood of Gordonsville, where a sharp cavalry encounter took place, with loss on both sides; yet the enemy rapidly fell back towards the Rapidan, and seemed disinclined to operate in the fine open country south of it. This was generalship. They knew not what force was approaching; by crossing the stream and destroying the bridges, a deep unfordable river was left in our front, which would occasion much delay; and as Culpeper was as a pivot-point by which the enemy could keep open the communication with their main army under Pope, approaching east by north; with Miles advancing from the west through the Valley with a heavy force, and with Washington nearly due north; Banks had massed his troops in a wooded plain near Cedar Mountain. Pope was not more than thirty miles to his left, with large masses advancing; while Miles, with fourteen thousand of all arms, was midway up the Valley, distant some forty or more m
l tales of fiction. Rape, arson, and theft seem to be the constant attendants of an army professing to fight for the Union. A recital of the horrible murders that mark its bloody attack, one might suppose, would appall the doomed of Hades. Mrs. Fitzhugh, of Ravensworth — mother of the late Andrew Fitzhugh, of the Navy-a lady of distinguished position, and one singularly embodying the graces and virtues of her sex, was brutally murdered in front of her house. Ravensworth, the family-seat of , who was over eighty years of age, infirm and blind, leaning on the arm of her maid, was taking a little exercise in front of her mansion, when the girl suddenly cried out, 0 mistress there come the Yankees! and in terror ran to the house. Mrs. Fitzhugh called out to her, Don't leave me alone with these vile Yankees! when one of them approached, and, with the butt of his gun, killed her! Shortly after, two of her daughters, who had been visiting a neighbor, returned. One of them was seiz
the brutality practised by Pope's troops upon the poor people of Virginia, but annex one instance as an example of their ruffianism and cowardice. The facts are derived from a private and confidential letter: Federal atrocities in Virginia far outstrip all tales of fiction. Rape, arson, and theft seem to be the constant attendants of an army professing to fight for the Union. A recital of the horrible murders that mark its bloody attack, one might suppose, would appall the doomed of Hades. Mrs. Fitzhugh, of Ravensworth — mother of the late Andrew Fitzhugh, of the Navy-a lady of distinguished position, and one singularly embodying the graces and virtues of her sex, was brutally murdered in front of her house. Ravensworth, the family-seat of the Fitzhughs, you know, is one of the oldest estates in Virginia; it has been in the, family since the reign of Charles the Second, from whom it was received as a grant, and has ever been noted as a place where a profuse hospitality was
sent forward a flag of truce, giving Banks permission to bury his dead, which was readily accepted; provision was of course taken to prevent the Yankees from prying too closely into our position and number. During the truce many officers of both armies met and conversed upon the field, and all seemed animated with the best of feeling. General Stuart was among the first to mount his horse to trot over the field; and while engaged in conversation, up rode his old companion in arms, Brigadier-General Hartsuff, of the Federal cavalry, and politely saluting him, jocularly remarked: Hallo Stuart, my boy, how goes it? who'd a thought of such changes within so short a time? I was over you once, you know; now you're a full major-general, and I but a simple brigadier. It cannot be denied that much bravery had been displayed by both armies in this brief encounter, and the brigades led forward against our batteries behaved wonderfully well. This did not surprise us when we learned that the
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 41
preparations and dispositions of General Lee Jackson is sent in the van what he does, and the many expected we should cross at this point, but Jackson had made other arrangements, and unexpectedlyir precise position could not be ascertained, Jackson was busily engaged along our lines, making — appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Sall his mode of warfare, laughed at the idea. Jackson is too wise to defer an engagement, said theynd begin the engagement. This exactly suited Jackson, who had posted a heavy force of artillery onstill in front. It was well, therefore, that Jackson had not pushed forward too far, or it must haheavy force of artillery; while the most that Jackson could muster numbered from twenty thousand tothat he would, as usual, claim it as his own, Jackson determined to put the disputed question beyoncompletely disperse them. Next day, however, Jackson sent forward a flag of truce, giving Banks pe[3 more...]
Fitz-Hugh Lee (search for this): chapter 41
combinations of the enemy developing by McClellan on our right and Pope on the left preparations and dispositions of General Lee Jackson is sent in the van what he does, and the manner of doing it he breaks the advance corps of his old friend Bpeninsula, which he now considered untenable. But before this final movement of the much-abused McClellan took place, General Lee perceived the scene of action was rapidly changing from the James to the Rappahannock, and that every available man atn to whistle ominously, and with a mysterious wink in the direction of the Shenandoah Valley, would sarcastically observe, Lee's short of rations again! Jackson's detailed to go to the commissary! in allusion to the immense supplies more than onced effected his — escape from Harrison's Landing, and was doubtless transporting his troops to Washington. It was possibly Lee's plan to overwhelm Pope and his Army of Virginia ere the remains of McClellan's Army of the Potomac could come to his ass
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