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Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 8
lowed; and last came the hero and patriot, Sterling Price, with his ragged, half-fed, and ill-armed e right of the road, assisted by Pearce, while Price was on the left of it; and thoughtless of danghed up the ground in our front. Yet there old Price, our gallant commander, rode up and down the led in our favor on the right, Lyon was pushing Price with great vigor in the centre and left. Our At length, owing to the success of our right, Price was reenforced both with men and artillery; peansit of any number of troops from St. Louis. Price determined to march forward and attack it, butle these events were transpiring at Lexington, Price received word (September eighteenth) that Gene The Missourians then effected a junction with Price, and instilled new ardor into the whole army. was fast approaching the north ferry landing, Price got up steam on his captured boats, and transp in various regiments. I do not know how long Price will remain here, but, judging from reports an[15 more...]
Gabriel J. Rains (search for this): chapter 8
ttack it, but was informed that large bands of outlaws from Kansas, under General Jim Lane and others, were devastating the whole country on his left flank, and threatened to get in his rear. Suddenly diverging from his proper route, Price sent Rains and Parsons up in that direction, with a small force of determined men; and so secretly was the expedition conducted, that they unexpectedly came upon Lane at a creek called Drywood, and after. a confused fight of some hours, drove the enemy fro and careful in approaching through the outskirts, they resolved to charge the enemy's line of intrenchments placed higher up in town. They made the trial, and suffered considerably, and were then satisfied that cautious measures were the best. Rains's force moved forward, and without much opposition occupied a good position north-north-east of the breastworks, and with two batteries maintained an effective and destructive fire upon them, from which there was no escape; Parsons moved up sout
o the whole army. Lane was defeated, but now it was known that Sturgis was approaching, also, on the north bank, his object being to cross over and assist Mulligan, with over fifteen hundred cavalry. To accomplish this, he depended upon the ferry-boats for transportation; but these boats, lying snugly under the bluff, Price determined to capture, at whatever cost, particularly as a large steamboat also lying there was reported to contain considerable quantities of stores. Directing Colonel Rives to this point, that officer carefully approached from the west, along the river's edge, partly within view of the fortifications, and effected the important capture in gallant style, removing the vessels beyond reach of destruction. Mulligan saw the manoeuvre when too late, but opened a vigorous fire upon the party, and as many men fell, on account of the enemy's possession of a house on top of the bluff, several companies were detailed to attack it. Although advancing under a deadly f
s, and made several attempts to dislodge them, without success. While these events were transpiring at Lexington, Price received word (September eighteenth) that General D. R. Atcheson (formerly President of the United States Senate) and Colonel Saunders were coming down the north bank of the river to support him. Having reached a point twenty-five miles above the city, two thousand of this force crossed with Saunders, Atcheson being left in charge of the remainder. General Jim Lane, howeveSaunders, Atcheson being left in charge of the remainder. General Jim Lane, however, was also approaching in the same direction with a heavy force of his Kansas Jayhawkers to reenforce Mulligan in Lexington, and, finding Atcheson with so small a force, vigorously attacked him. The Missourians knew these Jayhawkers of old, in many a border fight, and, taking to the woods, they maintained such a murderous fire that Lane was soon routed, with a loss of more than two hundred, while Atcheson lost but ten! The Missourians then effected a junction with Price, and instilled new ardo
Franz Sigel (search for this): chapter 8
, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and oSigel, and others formed a junction at Springfield, where they numbered some twelve or fifteen thousand men, wef Springfield, where it was reported Lyon and Sigel were encamped on hills beside the road. We ha we were all alike in a precarious condition. Sigel, in fact, was attacking our right and rear wit excitement and formed line, it was found that Sigel had already advanced some distance, while Lyon, hearing that Sigel was fairly engaged, pushed the centre and left with great energy. Totten's babserving the destructive effect of the fire of Sigel's guns, McCulloch, determined to make a bold dnd slashing about them with the wildest fury. Sigel was totally routed! His infantry, opposed to the impetuosity and valor of our men, as both Sigel and Lyon crept upon us during night, and took ers are the valiant German and Dutch heroes of Sigel, runaways from battle-fields, who show their p
Samuel D. Sturgis (search for this): chapter 8
not remained in this wilderness of a place many days when information was brought that Lyon and Sturgis had suddenly ceased their pursuit, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Cartha, and instilled new ardor into the whole army. Lane was defeated, but now it was known that Sturgis was approaching, also, on the north bank, his object being to cross over and assist Mulligan, wbeing completely cut off from water, his men were failing in strength every hour. Hearing that Sturgis was fast approaching the north ferry landing, Price got up steam on his captured boats, and trated a strong force over to that side, under Parsons, who managed the enterprise so warily, that Sturgis barely escaped capture; his whole command retreated in the wildest disorder, leaving hundreds os, the loss of the enemy being very considerable. Seeing his boats captured, and that Lane and Sturgis, instead of fighting their way to him, had skedaddled in all directions, Mulligan showed evide
Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
om Kansas, under General Jim Lane and others, were devastating the whole country on his left flank, and threatened to get in his rear. Suddenly diverging from his proper route, Price sent Rains and Parsons up in that direction, with a small force of determined men; and so secretly was the expedition conducted, that they unexpectedly came upon Lane at a creek called Drywood, and after. a confused fight of some hours, drove the enemy from the field, pushed forward to their headquarters at Fort Scott, and captured it, with every thing intact. Joining the column under Price again, our army of five thousand effectives and five guns pushed forward towards Lexington, and arrived in the vicinity on the thirteenth of September. Our irregular horse (for I can call them nothing else) did good service in scouring the country for supplies, and keeping the enemy within the lines of the town, and although frequently invited to combat, the noble Yankees remained quietly within their chain of b
Lexington, Lafayette County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ions, whence supplies could be easily transported into the interior by wagon-trains or boats. Lexington, held by Colonel Mulligan and a heavy force, was known to be strongly fortified, and being on n under Price again, our army of five thousand effectives and five guns pushed forward towards Lexington, and arrived in the vicinity on the thirteenth of September. Our irregular horse (for I ca the enemy ventured to attack; indeed, it was surmised that, upon hearing of our appearance at Lexington, Fremont would have collected his available force in St. Louis, and coming up in boats, reenfoseveral attempts to dislodge them, without success. While these events were transpiring at Lexington, Price received word (September eighteenth) that General D. R. Atcheson (formerly President ofing in the same direction with a heavy force of his Kansas Jayhawkers to reenforce Mulligan in Lexington, and, finding Atcheson with so small a force, vigorously attacked him. The Missourians knew th
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ch are surprised, but prove victorious death of the Federal General Lyon, and promotion of General Fremont Misunderstanding between Southern Generals cruel devastation of the country by Federal troops character of Fremont siege and capture of Lexington by Price immense booty. The scene of action now shifts to Missouri, and, as before, I am able to give authentic details of the events that took place in that State, having received the following letter descriptive of the battles of Oak Hill and Lexington: Dear Tom: My last letter informed you that, after the action of Carthage, the small commands of Price, McCulloch, and Pearce were on their way to Cowskin Prairie, in order to recruit and organize. We had not remained in this wilderness of a place many days when information was brought that Lyon and Sturgis had suddenly ceased their pursuit, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and others formed a junction at Spri
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
, and medical outfits; immense supplies of every description; much clothing, shoes, tents, ammunition, and camp utensils, together with about one million dollars stolen from various banks, which we instantly returned. Mulligan's sword was politely returned to him by Price with a neat speech, and all the prisoners being paroled, were immediately sent North on their way rejoicing. Such jubilation was visible in every camp as I will not attempt to describe, although, from your description of Manassas, I suppose one scene is very much like another in this respect. My left arm was wounded in the assault on the bluff, and has caused me much suffering; but to keep my promise I have partly written and partly dictated this scrawl, so that you may form some idea of our doings. The mails between us are few and far between, but I look for a letter from you every days Love to all your boys and any old friends, for I suppose you meet old schoolmates every day in various regiments. I do not know
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