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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
n (whom I recognized, on the field, having frequently seen him in St. Louis) was riding, hastily from point to point, cheering and leading hias made Captain by brevet, August twentieth, 1847; and arrived in St. Louis in April, 1861, having been sent from his post far in the South-Ws great activity in aiding the suppression of Southern feeling in St. Louis endeared him to the abolitionists; he seized the arsenal, erectedmander-in-Chief, was actively engaged in forming a large army in St. Louis, and, having unlimited funds and supplies, was likely to take the river was kept open for the transit of any number of troops from St. Louis. Price determined to march forward and attack it, but was informat Lexington, Fremont would have collected his available force in St. Louis, and coming up in boats, reenforced Mulligan, and chased us out oemain here, but, judging from reports and Fremont's uneasiness in St. Louis, suspect Price will be again moving, heaven only knows where, in
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
age. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and others formed a junction at Springfield, where they numbered some twelve or fifteen thousand men, well a Not only were we deficient in weapons, but when the march on Springfield commenced our commissary and quartermaster's departments, but reof toilsome travel, we approached a point thirty miles south of Springfield, where it was reported Lyon and Sigel were encamped on hills bes, found that the enemy had decamped and gone in the direction of Springfield. Their strength we could not ascertain with precision, but theyof August we camped at Wilson's Creek, about ten miles south of Springfield, and the whole country was scoured for provisions. Whatever the was found among the dead, and was decently coffined and sent to Springfield for interment. It was discovered that two small buckshot had pn Missouri. His body was interred by us in a metallic coffin at Springfield, but subsequently given to his friends, who removed it north to
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
as also beef cattle; and farmers, being friendly to our cause, willingly sold all things for Confederate paper, so that it much relieved the commissariat, and eased the line of march. Ben McCulloch, with his small column, led the way; Pearce of Arkansas followed; and last came the hero and patriot, Sterling Price, with his ragged, half-fed, and ill-armed band of Missourians. After many days of toilsome travel, we approached a point thirty miles south of Springfield, where it was reported a large army in St. Louis, and, having unlimited funds and supplies, was likely to take the field in great strength. The desire of Price, however, did not meet with the approval of General McCulloch, who wished to fall back. on the frontier of Arkansas, and allow the enemy to weary themselves in hunting for him. Price was patriotic enough to waive every personal consideration, but in this case his judgment was against concession, and as the State had not then formally seceded, he held no commi
we could not ascertain with precision, but they were said to number at least ten thousand men, well armed, well drilled, and counting thousands of regulars among them. They also had a strong force of cavalry, and some twenty pieces of artillery-Totten's battery being considered one of the best in the old Federal army. Our effective force amounted to about five thousand ill-armed, badly drilled men, and some six thousand horsemen, who were, for politeness' sake, called cavalry; but they had nong into confusion. When our men had recovered from their excitement and formed line, it was found that Sigel had already advanced some distance, while Lyon, hearing that Sigel was fairly engaged, pushed the centre and left with great energy. Totten's battery was admirably posted on an eminence, and ploughed up the ground in our front. Yet there old Price, our gallant commander, rode up and down the line, with white hair streaming in the wind, cheering, forming, and encouraging his ragged m
Connecticut Yankee (search for this): chapter 8
risoners and arms, besides ammunition and stores. We pursued the enemy several miles, and then returning to camp, made ourselves comfortable on the good things which had fallen to our lot. The body of poor Lyon was found among the dead, and was decently coffined and sent to Springfield for interment. It was discovered that two small buckshot had penetrated, one above, and another below, the left nipple: death must have been almost instantaneous. Major-General Nathaniel Lyon was a Connecticut Yankee of the abolition type; not more than forty-five years of age, small in stature, wiry, active, with dark hair and complexion, small black eyes; fond of military pomp, but an excellent, though restless, and ambitious officer. He entered the United States army as Second Lieutenant, July first, 1841; was made Captain by brevet, August twentieth, 1847; and arrived in St. Louis in April, 1861, having been sent from his post far in the South-West to stand a court-martial on the charge of pec
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