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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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Frank Blair (search for this): chapter 8
a poor undrilled body of adventurers living upon the public, and trusting to heaven for supplies, our regiments and brigades were animated with a burning enthusiasm for action, and an unbounded confidence in our leader, which were enough to carry us through any enterprise. Everywhere, as we proceeded, signs were multiplied of the wanton waste and recklessness of the Dutch dastards and Northern fanatics in the pay of Fremont. He was the most ultra abolitionist who could be found, and Frank Blair pointed him out as of the right stripe --the coming man --one who would put the war upon a proper footing! seize and confiscate the property of all who dared oppose the ruling system of Northern Government, etc. Truly the barbarities of our enemies are beyond all description. All law-save military law — is suspended, banks robbed of specie, wealthy men .compelled to contribute largely for the wholesale destruction of friends and relatives, to say nothing of their political rights; priso
Habeas Corpus (search for this): chapter 8
an --one who would put the war upon a proper footing! seize and confiscate the property of all who dared oppose the ruling system of Northern Government, etc. Truly the barbarities of our enemies are beyond all description. All law-save military law — is suspended, banks robbed of specie, wealthy men .compelled to contribute largely for the wholesale destruction of friends and relatives, to say nothing of their political rights; prisons full in every city where their rule is paramount; Habeas Corpus laughed at, dwellings seized, property confiscated, negroes sold and carried away, farms destroyed, cattle driven off, barns, houses, burned before their owners' eyes, while mothers, wives, sisters, or daughters, are insulted and disgraced, and oftentimes murdered. All this is true. God forbid I should exaggerate; and were I willing to do so, things are so bad they could not be painted worse, with all the coloring in the world. Our whole march to this place has presented harrowing si
h of the Federal General Lyon, and promotion of General Fremont Misunderstanding between Southern Generals ction of the country by Federal troops character of Fremont siege and capture of Lexington by Price immense bon that information was constantly reaching us that Fremont, the new Federal Commander-in-Chief, was actively Dutch dastards and Northern fanatics in the pay of Fremont. He was the most ultra abolitionist who could be f more than sufficient to accommodate the majesty of Fremont; guards pace before his door night and day; servanting in camp, it was ascertained beyond a doubt that Fremont was strongly fortifying all important cities on the that, upon hearing of our appearance at Lexington, Fremont would have collected his available force in St. Lount duty night and day. At the same time, fearful of Fremont's or some other officer's arrival to raise the siegice will remain here, but, judging from reports and Fremont's uneasiness in St. Louis, suspect Price will be ag
attack it, but was informed that large bands of outlaws from Kansas, under General Jim Lane and others, were devastating the whole country on his left flank, and thre; and so secretly was the expedition conducted, that they unexpectedly came upon Lane at a creek called Drywood, and after. a confused fight of some hours, drove thece crossed with Saunders, Atcheson being left in charge of the remainder. General Jim Lane, however, was also approaching in the same direction with a heavy force ofrder fight, and, taking to the woods, they maintained such a murderous fire that Lane was soon routed, with a loss of more than two hundred, while Atcheson lost but teffected a junction with Price, and instilled new ardor into the whole army. Lane was defeated, but now it was known that Sturgis was approaching, also, on the no loss of the enemy being very considerable. Seeing his boats captured, and that Lane and Sturgis, instead of fighting their way to him, had skedaddled in all direct
Nathaniel Lyon (search for this): chapter 8
but prove victorious death of the Federal General Lyon, and promotion of General Fremont Misundeace many days when information was brought that Lyon and Sturgis had suddenly ceased their pursuit, scomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and others formed a junction at Springfes south of Springfield, where it was reported Lyon and Sigel were encamped on hills beside the roaughtless of danger — in fact, never dreaming of Lyon being in the vicinity at all-threw out no pickesant discharges and their accurate aim, stopped Lyon's advance, and equalized the fight in the centrhe battle progressed in our favor on the right, Lyon was pushing Price with great vigor in the centr artillery; perceiving which, it was obvious to Lyon that nothing short of desperate courage could ts which had fallen to our lot. The body of poor Lyon was found among the dead, and was decently cofftuosity and valor of our men, as both Sigel and Lyon crept upon us during night, and took up command[3 more...]
Ben McCulloch (search for this): chapter 8
Missouri the Confederates under Price and McCulloch are surprised, but prove victorious death on of Carthage, the small commands of Price, McCulloch, and Pearce were on their way to Cowskin Praommissariat, and eased the line of march. Ben McCulloch, with his small column, led the way; Pearcovidence for the abundance of green corn. Ben McCulloch had halted his advance on the right of theick! we are surrounded! fall in! fall in! McCulloch was surprised, as none will venture to deny,ized the fight in the centre and left, while McCulloch was stemming the storm on the right and reartructive effect of the fire of Sigel's guns, McCulloch, determined to make a bold dash, and, if posracy of our fire, taking advantage of which, McCulloch dashed forward with his companies, and beforwever, did not meet with the approval of General McCulloch, who wished to fall back. on the frontiConfederate seal, and, was not bound to obey McCulloch. Accordingly, finding there was no prospect
agon-trains or boats. Lexington, held by Colonel Mulligan and a heavy force, was known to be strongSt. Louis, and coming up in boats, reenforced Mulligan, and chased us out of the country. Our Gy force of his Kansas Jayhawkers to reenforce Mulligan in Lexington, and, finding Atcheson with so snk, his object being to cross over and assist Mulligan, with over fifteen hundred cavalry. To accoming the vessels beyond reach of destruction. Mulligan saw the manoeuvre when too late, but opened aain works, and could be made to command them, Mulligan collected a strong force, sallied forth, and and left, sweeping every thing before them. Mulligan's position, however, was still a strong one, ay to him, had skedaddled in all directions, Mulligan showed evident signs of yielding, and it mustrom every point, the result of which was that Mulligan hoisted a white flag on his works towards fou various banks, which we instantly returned. Mulligan's sword was politely returned to him by Price
others, were devastating the whole country on his left flank, and threatened to get in his rear. Suddenly diverging from his proper route, Price sent Rains and Parsons up in that direction, with a small force of determined men; and so secretly was the expedition conducted, that they unexpectedly came upon Lane at a creek called good position north-north-east of the breastworks, and with two batteries maintained an effective and destructive fire upon them, from which there was no escape; Parsons moved up south-south-west, and was also favorably posted; each of these brigades having supports-within call, should the enemy sally down from the hill, and attemaring that Sturgis was fast approaching the north ferry landing, Price got up steam on his captured boats, and transported a strong force over to that side, under Parsons, who managed the enterprise so warily, that Sturgis barely escaped capture; his whole command retreated in the wildest disorder, leaving hundreds of tents, camp e
e battles of Oak Hill and Lexington: Dear Tom: My last letter informed you that, after the action of Carthage, the small commands of Price, McCulloch, and Pearce were on their way to Cowskin Prairie, in order to recruit and organize. We had not remained in this wilderness of a place many days when information was brought sold all things for Confederate paper, so that it much relieved the commissariat, and eased the line of march. Ben McCulloch, with his small column, led the way; Pearce of Arkansas followed; and last came the hero and patriot, Sterling Price, with his ragged, half-fed, and ill-armed band of Missourians. After many days of toantly appropriated, and many of us thanked Providence for the abundance of green corn. Ben McCulloch had halted his advance on the right of the road, assisted by Pearce, while Price was on the left of it; and thoughtless of danger — in fact, never dreaming of Lyon being in the vicinity at all-threw out no pickets; or if any were
nstantly returned. Mulligan's sword was politely returned to him by Price with a neat speech, and all the prisoners being paroled, were immediately sent North on their way rejoicing. Such jubilation was visible in every camp as I will not attempt to describe, although, from your description of Manassas, I suppose one scene is very much like another in this respect. My left arm was wounded in the assault on the bluff, and has caused me much suffering; but to keep my promise I have partly written and partly dictated this scrawl, so that you may form some idea of our doings. The mails between us are few and far between, but I look for a letter from you every days Love to all your boys and any old friends, for I suppose you meet old schoolmates every day in various regiments. I do not know how long Price will remain here, but, judging from reports and Fremont's uneasiness in St. Louis, suspect Price will be again moving, heaven only knows where, in a few days. Yours always, Polk.
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