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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ch are surprised, but prove victorious death of the Federal General Lyon, and promotion of General Fremont Misunderstanding between Southern Generals cruel devastation of the country by Federal troops character of Fremont siege and capture of Lexington by Price immense booty. The scene of action now shifts to Missouri, and, as before, I am able to give authentic details of the events that took place in that State, having received the following letter descriptive of the battles of Oak Hill and Lexington: Dear Tom: My last letter informed you that, after the action of Carthage, the small commands of Price, McCulloch, and Pearce were on their way to Cowskin Prairie, in order to recruit and organize. We had not remained in this wilderness of a place many days when information was brought that Lyon and Sturgis had suddenly ceased their pursuit, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and others formed a junction at Spri
Missouri (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
pace before his door night and day; servants in gay livery hand around catawba on silver waiters; grooms and orderlies flit about like poor imitations of the same class of servants in German cities, while the ruling language of the court is very low Dutch, redolent of lager-beer and schnapps But to return to the true object of this hurried letter. From those constantly arriving in camp, it was ascertained beyond a doubt that Fremont was strongly fortifying all important cities on the Missouri River, to serve as a safe base of operations, whence supplies could be easily transported into the interior by wagon-trains or boats. Lexington, held by Colonel Mulligan and a heavy force, was known to be strongly fortified, and being on high ground, it commanded all approaches from the interior, while the river was kept open for the transit of any number of troops from St. Louis. Price determined to march forward and attack it, but was informed that large bands of outlaws from Kansas, under
Lexington, Lafayette County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ions, whence supplies could be easily transported into the interior by wagon-trains or boats. Lexington, held by Colonel Mulligan and a heavy force, was known to be strongly fortified, and being on n under Price again, our army of five thousand effectives and five guns pushed forward towards Lexington, and arrived in the vicinity on the thirteenth of September. Our irregular horse (for I ca the enemy ventured to attack; indeed, it was surmised that, upon hearing of our appearance at Lexington, Fremont would have collected his available force in St. Louis, and coming up in boats, reenfoseveral attempts to dislodge them, without success. While these events were transpiring at Lexington, Price received word (September eighteenth) that General D. R. Atcheson (formerly President ofing in the same direction with a heavy force of his Kansas Jayhawkers to reenforce Mulligan in Lexington, and, finding Atcheson with so small a force, vigorously attacked him. The Missourians knew th
Wilson's Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
' sake, called cavalry; but they had not a particle of discipline among them; they had been drilled to serve on foot, and were armed with every imaginable weapon; their horses, too, were little better than skeletons. Finding that the enemy had fallen back the day previous before our advance-guard, we hurried forward in pursuit; but after a march of some twenty miles, the men were completely broken down from fatigue and the want of proper supplies. On the tenth of August we camped at Wilson's Creek, about ten miles south of Springfield, and the whole country was scoured for provisions. Whatever the fields produced was instantly appropriated, and many of us thanked Providence for the abundance of green corn. Ben McCulloch had halted his advance on the right of the road, assisted by Pearce, while Price was on the left of it; and thoughtless of danger — in fact, never dreaming of Lyon being in the vicinity at all-threw out no pickets; or if any were in advance, they were few indeed
Cowskin Prairie (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
untry by Federal troops character of Fremont siege and capture of Lexington by Price immense booty. The scene of action now shifts to Missouri, and, as before, I am able to give authentic details of the events that took place in that State, having received the following letter descriptive of the battles of Oak Hill and Lexington: Dear Tom: My last letter informed you that, after the action of Carthage, the small commands of Price, McCulloch, and Pearce were on their way to Cowskin Prairie, in order to recruit and organize. We had not remained in this wilderness of a place many days when information was brought that Lyon and Sturgis had suddenly ceased their pursuit, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and others formed a junction at Springfield, where they numbered some twelve or fifteen thousand men, well armed, disciplined, and counting among them a heavy force of U. S. regulars of all arms. In the mean time we
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
age. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and others formed a junction at Springfield, where they numbered some twelve or fifteen thousand men, well a Not only were we deficient in weapons, but when the march on Springfield commenced our commissary and quartermaster's departments, but reof toilsome travel, we approached a point thirty miles south of Springfield, where it was reported Lyon and Sigel were encamped on hills bes, found that the enemy had decamped and gone in the direction of Springfield. Their strength we could not ascertain with precision, but theyof August we camped at Wilson's Creek, about ten miles south of Springfield, and the whole country was scoured for provisions. Whatever the was found among the dead, and was decently coffined and sent to Springfield for interment. It was discovered that two small buckshot had pn Missouri. His body was interred by us in a metallic coffin at Springfield, but subsequently given to his friends, who removed it north to
Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
om Kansas, under General Jim Lane and others, were devastating the whole country on his left flank, and threatened to get in his rear. Suddenly diverging from his proper route, Price sent Rains and Parsons up in that direction, with a small force of determined men; and so secretly was the expedition conducted, that they unexpectedly came upon Lane at a creek called Drywood, and after. a confused fight of some hours, drove the enemy from the field, pushed forward to their headquarters at Fort Scott, and captured it, with every thing intact. Joining the column under Price again, our army of five thousand effectives and five guns pushed forward towards Lexington, and arrived in the vicinity on the thirteenth of September. Our irregular horse (for I can call them nothing else) did good service in scouring the country for supplies, and keeping the enemy within the lines of the town, and although frequently invited to combat, the noble Yankees remained quietly within their chain of b
Franz Sigel (search for this): chapter 8
, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and oSigel, and others formed a junction at Springfield, where they numbered some twelve or fifteen thousand men, wef Springfield, where it was reported Lyon and Sigel were encamped on hills beside the road. We ha we were all alike in a precarious condition. Sigel, in fact, was attacking our right and rear wit excitement and formed line, it was found that Sigel had already advanced some distance, while Lyon, hearing that Sigel was fairly engaged, pushed the centre and left with great energy. Totten's babserving the destructive effect of the fire of Sigel's guns, McCulloch, determined to make a bold dnd slashing about them with the wildest fury. Sigel was totally routed! His infantry, opposed to the impetuosity and valor of our men, as both Sigel and Lyon crept upon us during night, and took ers are the valiant German and Dutch heroes of Sigel, runaways from battle-fields, who show their p
nstantly returned. Mulligan's sword was politely returned to him by Price with a neat speech, and all the prisoners being paroled, were immediately sent North on their way rejoicing. Such jubilation was visible in every camp as I will not attempt to describe, although, from your description of Manassas, I suppose one scene is very much like another in this respect. My left arm was wounded in the assault on the bluff, and has caused me much suffering; but to keep my promise I have partly written and partly dictated this scrawl, so that you may form some idea of our doings. The mails between us are few and far between, but I look for a letter from you every days Love to all your boys and any old friends, for I suppose you meet old schoolmates every day in various regiments. I do not know how long Price will remain here, but, judging from reports and Fremont's uneasiness in St. Louis, suspect Price will be again moving, heaven only knows where, in a few days. Yours always, Polk.
D. R. Atcheson (search for this): chapter 8
ut success. While these events were transpiring at Lexington, Price received word (September eighteenth) that General D. R. Atcheson (formerly President of the United States Senate) and Colonel Saunders were coming down the north bank of the rive support him. Having reached a point twenty-five miles above the city, two thousand of this force crossed with Saunders, Atcheson being left in charge of the remainder. General Jim Lane, however, was also approaching in the same direction with a heavy force of his Kansas Jayhawkers to reenforce Mulligan in Lexington, and, finding Atcheson with so small a force, vigorously attacked him. The Missourians knew these Jayhawkers of old, in many a border fight, and, taking to the woods, they maintained such a murderous fire that Lane was soon routed, with a loss of more than two hundred, while Atcheson lost but ten! The Missourians then effected a junction with Price, and instilled new ardor into the whole army. Lane was defeated, but now it
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