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lines and turned loose. The Major is a cross-roads politician, and will, I doubt not, be a lion among his half-loyal neighbors when he returns home. March, 5 Our picket on the Manchester pike was driven in to-day. The cavalry, under General Stanley, went to the rescue, when a fight occurred. No particulars. March, 9 T. Buchanan Reid, the poet, entertained us at the court-house this evening. The room had been trimmed up by the rebels for a ball. The words, Shiloh, Fort Donelsonis a little man, with a heavy, light sandy mustache. Wood is a small man, short and slim, with dark complexion, and black whiskers. Crittenden, the majorgeneral, is a spare man, medium height, lank, common sort of face, well whiskered. Major-General Stanley, the cavalryman, is of good size, gentlemanly in bearing, light complexion, brown hair. McCook and Wood swear like pirates, and affect the roughand-ready style. Rousseau is given to profanity somewhat, and blusters occasionally. Rosecr
W. S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 22
and, until the appointment of Garfield, General Rosecrans had a lieutenant-colonel or major. Tng to the battle-field. Returning I met General Rosecrans and wife. The General hallooed after meout for orders to start. The army, under Rosecrans' administration, looks better than it ever d1-sons of Bitches within-dogs-Purps. General Rosecrans and staff, while riding by one day, were division, except mine, were reviewed by General Rosecrans this afternoon. It was a fine display, as been wearing a colonel's uniform; but General Rosecrans has expressed doubts about his right toe over that in probably three hours. General Rosecrans makes a fine display in his visits aboutfanity somewhat, and blusters occasionally. Rosecrans indulges in an oath now and then; but is a m whole whisker; Thomas shaves the upper lip. Rosecrans' nose is large, and curves down; Rousseau's ak nose, that would do no credit to a baby. Rosecrans' laugh is not one of the free, open, hearty [7 more...]
It was a fine display, but hard on the soldiers; they were kept so long standing. At Middletown, sixteen miles away, the rebels are four thousand strong, and within a day or two they have ventured to Salem, five miles distant. March, 20 Loomis, who has just returned from home, called this evening, and we drank a bottle of wine over the promotion. He is in trouble about his commission as colonel of artillery. Two months ago the Governor of Michigan gave him the commission, and since that time he has been wearing a colonel's uniform; but General Rosecrans has expressed doubts about his right to assume the rank. Loomis is all right, doubtless, and to-morrow, when the matter is talked over between the General and himself, it will be settled satisfactorily. March, 21 I have been running over Russell's diary, North and South, and must say the Yankee Nation, when looked at through Mr. Russell's spectacles, does not appear enveloped in that star-spangled glory and super-cel
R. S. Granger (search for this): chapter 22
hree hours. General Rosecrans makes a fine display in his visits about the camps. He is accompanied by his staff and a large and well-equipped escort, with outriders in front and rear. The National flag is borne at the head of the column. Rosecrans is of medium height and stout, not quite so tall as McCook, and not nearly so heavy. McCook is young, and very fleshy. Rousseau is by far the handsomest man in the army; tall and well-proportioned, but possibly a little too bulky. R. S. Granger is a little man, with a heavy, light sandy mustache. Wood is a small man, short and slim, with dark complexion, and black whiskers. Crittenden, the majorgeneral, is a spare man, medium height, lank, common sort of face, well whiskered. Major-General Stanley, the cavalryman, is of good size, gentlemanly in bearing, light complexion, brown hair. McCook and Wood swear like pirates, and affect the roughand-ready style. Rousseau is given to profanity somewhat, and blusters occasionally.
oops, neither State will take an interest in him, and render him that assistance which, under other circumstances, either of them might do. These gentlemen dined with me. Harker and Wilder expressed a high opinion of General Buell. Wilder says Gilbert is a d-d scoundrel, and responsible for the loss at Mumfordsville. Harker, however, defended Gilbert, and is the only man I have ever heard speak favorably of him. The train coming from Nashville to-day was fired upon and four men wounded. Gilbert, and is the only man I have ever heard speak favorably of him. The train coming from Nashville to-day was fired upon and four men wounded. Yesterday there was a force of the enemy along the whole south front of our picket line. From the cook's tent, in the rear, comes a devotional refrain: I'm gui-en home, I'm gui-en home, To d-i-e no mo‘. March, 24 We are still pursuing the even tenor of our way on the fortifications. There are no indications of an advance. The army, however, is well equipped, in good spirits, and prepared to move at an hour's notice. Its confidence in Rosecrans is boundless, and whatever it ma
o tall as McCook, and not nearly so heavy. McCook is young, and very fleshy. Rousseau is by far the handsomest man in the army; tall and well-proportioned, but possir. McCook and Wood swear like pirates, and affect the roughand-ready style. Rousseau is given to profanity somewhat, and blusters occasionally. Rosecrans indulges have never heard him do so. He is a good drinker; and the same can be said of Rousseau. Rosecrans is an educated officer, who has rubbed much against the world, and has experience. Rousseau is brave, but knows little of military science. McCook is a chucklehead. Wood and Crittenden know how to blow their own horns exceedinglisker; Thomas shaves the upper lip. Rosecrans' nose is large, and curves down; Rousseau's is large, and curves up; McCook has a weak nose, that would do no credit to a baby. Rosecrans' laugh is not one of the free, open, hearty kind; Rousseau has a good laugh, but shows poor teeth; McCook has a grin, which excites the suspicion t
dred and twenty captured; loss on our side inconsiderable. The reporters have probably contributed largely to the brilliancy of this affair. It is always safe to accept with distrust all reports which affirm that a few men, with little loss, routed, slaughtered, or captured a large force. Peach and cherry trees are in fill bloom. The grass is beginning to creep out. Summer birds occasionally sing around us. In a few weeks more the trees will be in full leaf again. March, 23 General Negley, who went home some time ago, returned to-day, and, I see, wears two stars. General Brannan arrived a day or two ago. He was on the train captured by guerrillas, but was rescued a few minutes after. The boys have a rumor that Bragg is near, and has sent General Rosecrans a very polite note requesting him to surrender Murfreesboro at once. If the latter refuses to accept this most gentlemanly invitation to deliver up all his forces, Bragg proposes to commence an assault upon our
Funkhauser (search for this): chapter 22
and McCook shave clean; Crittenden and Wood go the whole whisker; Thomas shaves the upper lip. Rosecrans' nose is large, and curves down; Rousseau's is large, and curves up; McCook has a weak nose, that would do no credit to a baby. Rosecrans' laugh is not one of the free, open, hearty kind; Rousseau has a good laugh, but shows poor teeth; McCook has a grin, which excites the suspicion that he is either still very green or deficient in the upper story. March, 22 Colonels Wilder and Funkhauser called. We had just disposed of a bottle of wine, when Colonel Harker made his appearance, and we entered forthwith upon another. Colonel Wilder expects to accomplish a great work with his mounted infantry. He is endeavoring to arm them with the Henry rifle, a gun which, with a slight twist of the wrist, will throw sixteen bullets in almost that many seconds. I have no doubt he will render his command very efficient and useful, for he has wonderful energy and nerve, and is, besides, se
T. Buchanan Reid (search for this): chapter 22
day. The cavalry, under General Stanley, went to the rescue, when a fight occurred. No particulars. March, 9 T. Buchanan Reid, the poet, entertained us at the court-house this evening. The room had been trimmed up by the rebels for a ball. honored stood for Bragg, and not for the commander of the Seventeenth Brigade, U. S. A. General Garfield introduced Mr. Reid by a short speech, not delivered in his usual happy style. I was impressed with the idea all the time, that he had too great many buttons-and the splendor of the double row possibly detracted somewhat from the splendor of his remarks. Mr. Reid is a small man, and has not sufficient voice to make himself heard distinctly in so large a hall. In a parlor his recitf fashion before the rebellion began. It would, however, be very satisfactory to the rank and file to see it restored. Mr. Reid said some good things in his lecture, and was well applauded; but, in the main, he was too ethereal, vapory, and fancifu
Simon Bolivar Buckner (search for this): chapter 22
ssary delay, go to that region which we are told is paved with good intentions. The voice of a colored person in the rear breaks in upon my recollections of the warbler. The most interesting and ugliest negro now in camp, is known as Simon Bolivar Buckner. He is an animal that has been worth in his day eighteen hundred dollars, an estray from the estate of General S. B. Buckner. He manages, by blacking boots and baking leather pies, to make money. He deluded me into buying a second pie General S. B. Buckner. He manages, by blacking boots and baking leather pies, to make money. He deluded me into buying a second pie from him one day, by assuring me, on honah, sah, dat de las pie was better'n de fus', case he hab strawberries in him. True, the pie had strawberries in him, but not enough to pay one for chewing the whit-leather crust. March, 30 Read Judge Holt's review of the proceedings and findings in the case of Fitzjohn Porter. If the review presents the facts fairly, Porter should have been not only dismissed, but hung. An officer who, with thirteen thousand men, will remain idle when within sig
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