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or the granting of a limited number of furloughs, gives great satisfaction to the men. They not only feel that they will soon have help, but that if their conduct be good, there will be a fair chance for them to see home before the expiration of their term of enlistment. Hitherto they have been something like prisoners without hope. March, 26 Another little misfortune has occurred to our arms at Brentwood. The Twenty-second Wisconsin, numbering four hundred men, was captured by General Forrest. The rebels succeed admirably in gathering up and consolidating our scattered troops. The Adjutant and others are having a concert in the next tent, and certainly laugh more over their own performance than singers do generally. They have just executed The foin ould Irish gintleman, And are at this present writing shouting Vive l'america, home of the free. I think it more than probable that as their enthusiasm increases, the punch in their punch-bowl diminishes. March, 2
s in a dozen places, was encompassed by wreaths of flowers, now faded and yellow. My native modesty led me to conclude that the letter so highly honored stood for Bragg, and not for the commander of the Seventeenth Brigade, U. S. A. General Garfield introduced Mr. Reid by a short speech, not delivered in his usual happy style.tars. General Brannan arrived a day or two ago. He was on the train captured by guerrillas, but was rescued a few minutes after. The boys have a rumor that Bragg is near, and has sent General Rosecrans a very polite note requesting him to surrender Murfreesboro at once. If the latter refuses to accept this most gentlemanly invitation to deliver up all his forces, Bragg proposes to commence an assault upon our works at twelve M., and show us no mercy. This, of course, is reliable. At sunset rain began to fall, and has continued to pour down steadily ever since. The night is gloomy. Adjutant Wilson, in the next tent, is endeavoring to lift hims
Fourth of July occasions. He has treated us, however, fully as well as we have treated him. We became angry because he told unpleasant truths about us, and he became enraged because we abused him for it. He thanks God that he is not an American; and should not we, in a spirit of conciliation, meet him half way, and feel thankful that he is not? Flaming dispatches will appear in the Northern papers to-morrow respecting the defeat of John Morgan, by a small brigade of our troops under Colonel Hall. The report will say that forty of the enemy were killed, one hundred and fifty wounded, and one hundred and twenty captured; loss on our side inconsiderable. The reporters have probably contributed largely to the brilliancy of this affair. It is always safe to accept with distrust all reports which affirm that a few men, with little loss, routed, slaughtered, or captured a large force. Peach and cherry trees are in fill bloom. The grass is beginning to creep out. Summer birds occ
John Morgan (search for this): chapter 22
which it is wont to loom up before patriotic eyes on Fourth of July occasions. He has treated us, however, fully as well as we have treated him. We became angry because he told unpleasant truths about us, and he became enraged because we abused him for it. He thanks God that he is not an American; and should not we, in a spirit of conciliation, meet him half way, and feel thankful that he is not? Flaming dispatches will appear in the Northern papers to-morrow respecting the defeat of John Morgan, by a small brigade of our troops under Colonel Hall. The report will say that forty of the enemy were killed, one hundred and fifty wounded, and one hundred and twenty captured; loss on our side inconsiderable. The reporters have probably contributed largely to the brilliancy of this affair. It is always safe to accept with distrust all reports which affirm that a few men, with little loss, routed, slaughtered, or captured a large force. Peach and cherry trees are in fill bloom.
H. F. Kalfus (search for this): chapter 22
the negro. The concluding paragraph of his letter was in these words: . The service can not possibly suffer by my resignation. The document passed through my hands on its way to Department head quarters, and I indorsed it as follows: Major H. F. Kalfus, Fifteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, being painfully and reluctantly convinced that the party in power is disposed to elevate the negro, desires to quit the service. I trust he will be allowed to do so, and cheerfully certify to the corould see; and I directed him to the Colonel's tent. As he turned to leave, he muttered, Man tole me Eighty-eighth Olehio ; but he went hobbling over to the Eighty-eighth, with fear, anxiety, and hope struggling in his old face. March, 4 Major Kalfus, Fifteenth Kentucky, arrested on Sunday, and since held in close confinement, was dishonorably dismissed from the service to-day for using treasonable language in tendering his resignation. He was escorted outside the lines and turned loose.
e upper story. March, 22 Colonels Wilder and Funkhauser called. We had just disposed of a bottle of wine, when Colonel Harker made his appearance, and we entered forthwith upon another. Colonel Wilder expects to accomplish a great work with hs command very efficient and useful, for he has wonderful energy and nerve, and is, besides, sensible and practical. Colonel Harker is greatly disappointed because he was not confirmed as brigadier-general during the last session of Congress. He is and render him that assistance which, under other circumstances, either of them might do. These gentlemen dined with me. Harker and Wilder expressed a high opinion of General Buell. Wilder says Gilbert is a d-d scoundrel, and responsible for the loss at Mumfordsville. Harker, however, defended Gilbert, and is the only man I have ever heard speak favorably of him. The train coming from Nashville to-day was fired upon and four men wounded. Yesterday there was a force of the enemy along the
has expressed doubts about his right to assume the rank. Loomis is all right, doubtless, and to-morrow, when the matter is talked over between the General and himself, it will be settled satisfactorily. March, 21 I have been running over Russell's diary, North and South, and must say the Yankee Nation, when looked at through Mr. Russell's spectacles, does not appear enveloped in that star-spangled glory and super-celestial blue with which it is wont to loom up before patriotic eyes on FMr. Russell's spectacles, does not appear enveloped in that star-spangled glory and super-celestial blue with which it is wont to loom up before patriotic eyes on Fourth of July occasions. He has treated us, however, fully as well as we have treated him. We became angry because he told unpleasant truths about us, and he became enraged because we abused him for it. He thanks God that he is not an American; and should not we, in a spirit of conciliation, meet him half way, and feel thankful that he is not? Flaming dispatches will appear in the Northern papers to-morrow respecting the defeat of John Morgan, by a small brigade of our troops under Colonel
sh la machree. Thy sons they are brave; but the battle once over, In brotherly peace with their foes they agree, And the roseate cheeks of thy daughters discover, The soul-speaking blush that says cush la machree. March, 17 Dined with General Wagner, and, in company with Wagner and General Palmer, witnessed an artillery review. March, 18 My brigade is still at work on the fortifications. They are, however, nearly completed. Shelter tents were issued to our division to-day. WeWagner and General Palmer, witnessed an artillery review. March, 18 My brigade is still at work on the fortifications. They are, however, nearly completed. Shelter tents were issued to our division to-day. We are still using the larger tent; but it is evidently the intention to leave these behind when we move. Last fall the shelter tents were used for a time bv the Pioneer Brigade. They are so small that a man cannot stand up in them. The boys were then very bitter in condemnation of them, and called them dog tents and dog pens. Almost every one of these tents was marked in a way to indicate the unfavorable opinion which the boys entertained of them, and in riding through the company quarters o
xpressed doubts about his right to assume the rank. Loomis is all right, doubtless, and to-morrow, when the matter is talked over between the General and himself, it will be settled satisfactorily. March, 21 I have been running over Russell's diary, North and South, and must say the Yankee Nation, when looked at through Mr. Russell's spectacles, does not appear enveloped in that star-spangled glory and super-celestial blue with which it is wont to loom up before patriotic eyes on Fourth of July occasions. He has treated us, however, fully as well as we have treated him. We became angry because he told unpleasant truths about us, and he became enraged because we abused him for it. He thanks God that he is not an American; and should not we, in a spirit of conciliation, meet him half way, and feel thankful that he is not? Flaming dispatches will appear in the Northern papers to-morrow respecting the defeat of John Morgan, by a small brigade of our troops under Colonel Hall.
March, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
March, 1863. March, 1 There is talk of consolidation at Washington. This is a sensible idea, and should be carried into effect at once. There are too many officers and too few men. The regiments should be consolidated, and kept full by conscription, if it can not be done otherwise. The best officers should be retained, and the others sent home to stand their chances of the draft. A major of the Fifteenth Kentucky sent in his resignation a few days ago, assigning as a reason for so doing that the object of the war was now the elevation of the negro. The concluding paragraph of his letter was in these words: . The service can not possibly suffer by my resignation. The document passed through my hands on its way to Department head quarters, and I indorsed it as follows: Major H. F. Kalfus, Fifteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, being painfully and reluctantly convinced that the party in power is disposed to elevate the negro, desires to quit the service. I trust he
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