hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. S. Rosecrans 121 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 80 0 Browse Search
O. M. Mitchell 75 1 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
Rousseau 68 18 Browse Search
Robert McCook 66 4 Browse Search
July 63 63 Browse Search
Negley 63 19 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 62 0 Browse Search
H. C. Hobart 61 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer. Search the whole document.

Found 176 total hits in 73 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
army life. A fellow claiming to have been sent here by the Governor of Maine to write songs for the army, and who wrote songs for quite a number of regiments, was arrested some days ago on the charge of being a spy. Last night he attempted to get away from the guard, and was shot. Drawings of our fortifications were found in his boots. He was quite well known throughout the army, and for a long time unsuspected. April, 12 Called on General Rousseau. He referred to his trip to Washington, and dwelt with great pleasuife on the various efforts of the people along the route to do him honor. At Lancaster, Pennsylvania, they stood in the cold an hour and a half awaiting his appearance. Our division, he informs me, is understood to possess the chivalric and dashing qualities --which the people admire. With all due respect, I suggested that dash was a good thing, doubtless, but steady, obstinate, well-directed fighting was better, and, in the end, would always succeed. W.
Ayrshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 23
nd rank, but mainly to those who failed to transmit the order in proper time. April, 29 Our large tents have been taken away, and shelter tents substituted. This evening, when the boys crawled into the latter, they gave utterance, good-humoredly, to every variety of howl, bark, snap, whine, and growl of which the dog is supposed to be capable. Colonel George Humphreys, Eighty-eighth Indiana, whom I supposed to be a full-blooded Hoosier, tells me he is a Scotchman, and was born in Ayrshire, in the same house in which Robert Burns had birth. His grandfather, James Humphreys, was the neighbor and companion of the poet. It was of him he wrote this epitaph, at an ale-house, in the way of pleasantry: Below these stanes lie Jamie's banes. O! Death, in my opinion, You ne'er took sic a blither'n bitch Into thy dark dominion. April, 30 This afternoon called on General Thomas; met General R. S. Granger; paid my respects to General Negley, and stopped for a moment at Gene
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ered to be the line of duty, our admiration for him is scarcely less than that we entertain for Jean Val Jean. April, 18 The Columbus (Ohio) Journal, of late date, under the head of Arrivals, says: General John Beatty has just married one of Ohio's loveliest daughters, and is stopping at the Neil House. Good for the General. This is a slander. I trust the paper of the next day made proper correction, and laid the charge, where it belongs, to wit: on General Samuel. If General Sam contishall have to beg him to change his name. My reputation can not stand many more such blows. What must those who know I have a wife and children think, when they see it announced that I have married again, and am stopping at the Neil with one of Ohio's loveliest daughters? What a horrible reflection upon the character of a constant and faithful husband! (This last sentence is written for my wife.) April, 19 Colonel Taylor and I rode over to General Rousseau's this morning. Returning,
Readyville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Patterson, a clerk, and as likely to be the offender as any one, now joins the party, and affirms, with great earnestness, that this practical joke business must end, or somebody will get hurt. April, 4 Saw Major-General McCook, wife, and staff riding out this morning. General Rosecrans was out this afternoon, but I did not see him. At this hour the signal corps is communicating from the dome of the court-house with the forces at Triune, sixteen miles away, and with the troops at Readyville and other points. In daylight this is done by flags, at night by torches. April, 5 There are many fine residences in Murfreesboro and vicinity; but the trees and shrubbery, which contributed in a great degree to their beauty and comfort, have been cut or trampled down and destroyed. Many frame houses, and very good ones, too, have been torn down, and the lumber and timber used in the construction of hospitals. There is a fearful stench in many places near here, arising from dec
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
him starve. The General appears to be well pleased with his fortifications, and asked me if I did not think it looked like remaining. I replied that the works were strong, and a small force could hold them, and that I should be well pleased if the enemy would attack us here, instead of compelling us to go further south. Yes, said he, I wish they would. General Lytle is to be assigned to Stanley Matthews' brigade. The latter was recently elected judge, and will resign and return to Cincinnati. The anti-Copperhead resolution business of the army must be pretty well exhausted. All the resolutions and letters on this subject that may appear hereafter may be accepted as bids for office. They havehowever, done a great deal of good, and I trust the public will not be forced to swallow an overdose. I had a faint inclination, at one time, to follow the example of my brother officers, and write a patriotic letter, but concluded to reserve my fire, and have had reason to congratu
Lancaster (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
songs for quite a number of regiments, was arrested some days ago on the charge of being a spy. Last night he attempted to get away from the guard, and was shot. Drawings of our fortifications were found in his boots. He was quite well known throughout the army, and for a long time unsuspected. April, 12 Called on General Rousseau. He referred to his trip to Washington, and dwelt with great pleasuife on the various efforts of the people along the route to do him honor. At Lancaster, Pennsylvania, they stood in the cold an hour and a half awaiting his appearance. Our division, he informs me, is understood to possess the chivalric and dashing qualities --which the people admire. With all due respect, I suggested that dash was a good thing, doubtless, but steady, obstinate, well-directed fighting was better, and, in the end, would always succeed. W. D. B., of the Commercial, Major McDowell, of Rousseau's staff, and Lieutenant Porter, called this afternoon. My report of
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ave me now; And then, with a vehemence which betokens desperation, I'll hang my harp on a willow tree, And off to the wars again. From which I infer it would be highly satisfactory to the young man to be demolished at the enemy's earliest convenience. A large amount of stores are accumulated here. Forty thousand boxes of hard bread are stacked in one pile at the depot, and greater quantities of flour, pork, vinegar, and molasses, than I have ever seen before. April, 3 An Indiana newspaper reached camp to-day containing an obituary notice of a lieutenant of the Eighty-eighth Indiana. It gives quite a lengthy biographical sketch of the deceased, and closes with a letter which purports to have been written on the battle-field by one Lieutenant John Thomas, in which Lieutenant Wildman, the subject of the sketch, is said to have been shot near Murfreesboro, and that his last words were: Bury me where I have fallen, and do not allow my body to be removed. The letter is
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
W. D. B., of the Commercial, Major McDowell, of Rousseau's staff, and Lieutenant Porter, called this afternoon. My report of the operations of my brigade at Stone river was referred to. Bickham thought it did not do justice to my command, and I have no doubt it is a sorry affair, compared with the elaborate reports of many othy other brigade faltered or fell back, damned if they didn't; but he drove the enemy, got 'em started, other brigades took courage and joined in the chase. At Stone river he drove the enemy again. Bullets came thicker'n hail; but his men stood up. He was with 'em. Damned hot, you better believe! Well, if he must say it himselfy, to one for whom I felt so kindly. You will report to me in person, without delay. W. S. Rosecrans, Maj.-General Brig.-Gen'l John Beatty, Fortifications, Stone river. P. S.-It might be well to bring this inclosure with you. The inclosure referred to was, of course, my letter to him. The answer was not, by any means,
d! (This last sentence is written for my wife.) April, 19 Colonel Taylor and I rode over to General Rousseau's this morning. Returning, we were joined by Colonel Nicholas, Second Kentucky; Colonel Hobart, Twenty-first Wisconsin, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bingham, First Wisconsin, all of whom took dinner with me. We had a right pleasant party, but rather boisterous, possibly, for the Sabbath day. There is at this moment a lively discussion in progress in the cook's tent, between two African gentlemen, in regard to military affairs. Old Hason says: Oh, hush, darkey! Buckner replies: Yer done no what'r talkin‘ about, nigger. I'll bet yer a thousand dollars. Hush! Yer ain't got five cents. Gor way, yer don't no nuffin‘. And so the debate continues; but, like many others, leads simply to confusion and bitterness. April, 20 This evening an order came transferring my brigade to Negley's division. It will be known hereafter as the Second Brigade, Second Division, Fourtee
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
homas, in which Lieutenant Wildman, the subject of the sketch, is said to have been shot near Murfreesboro, and that his last words were: Bury me where I have fallen, and do not allow my body to be re this is done by flags, at night by torches. April, 5 There are many fine residences in Murfreesboro and vicinity; but the trees and shrubbery, which contributed in a great degree to their beautrning of the 26th instant I received a telegram ordering our immediate return, and we reached Murfreesboro at two o'clock P. M. same day. I had not forgotten the terrible scolding received from trmy or the department under a cloud. I, therefore, sat down and wrote the following letter: Murfreesboro, April 27, 1863. Major-General W. S. Rosecrans, Commanding Department of the Cumberland: Sor order. Fifteen minutes later this reply came: Headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Murfreesboro, April, 1863. my dear General-I have just received the inclosed note, marked Private, but
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...