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alry force of 1800 men and four pieces of horse-artillery, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Cols. W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darkesville at 12 o'clock, and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it campearge number of horses of citizens were seized and brought along. The wires were cut and the railroad obstructed, and Colonel Jones's command was sent up the railroad towards Harrisburg to destroy a trestlework a few miles off. He, however, reportedest praise. A few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham, and Butler, and the officers and men under their commands, are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their cooln after a ride of four miles towards their supposed quarter of approach. Late in the evening I received a report from Colonel Jones, now commanding Robertson's brigade, that the hostile forces were retreating again towards Harper's Ferry, and that h
R. H. Chilton (search for this): chapter 10
had been thinking of me in Pennsylvania, by bringing back with him an excellent bay horse which he had himself selected for my riding. As I am fortunate enough to have General Stuart's own official report in Ms. of this memorable enterprise among my papers, I give it here, in the belief that the reader will be glad to follow our horsemen upon their journey in the words of the dashing raider himself. headquarters, cavalry division, October 14, 1862. To General R. E. Lee, Through Colonel R. H. Chilton, A. A. General, Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel,--I have the honour to report that on the 9th inst., in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General, Army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1800 men and four pieces of horse-artillery, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Cols. W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darkesville at 12 o'clock, and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville,
Francis Lawley (search for this): chapter 10
rain, and we thankfully accepted Mr D.‘s kind invitation on our arrival to dry our dripping garments and warm our chilled bodies before a roaring wood-fire in his large and comfortable family drawing-room. Here we found two Englishmen, the Hon. Francis Lawley, the well-known Richmond correspondent of the Times, and Mr Vizetelly, who was keeping the readers of the Illustrated London news informed of the events of the war with pen and pencil, with both of whom we were to spend many pleasant houceived from our kind friends, Mr D. and his family, numberless proofs of their great satisfaction in having us near them. In accordance with his promise, Mr Vizetelly came now to pay us a longer visit, unaccompanied, however, to our regret, by Mr Lawley, who had been obliged to go to Richmond for the purpose of sending off his regular letter to the Times. Our new guest was an old campaigner, who accommodated himself very readily to the hardships of camp life, and was soon established in his
his large and comfortable family drawing-room. Here we found two Englishmen, the Hon. Francis Lawley, the well-known Richmond correspondent of the Times, and Mr Vizetelly, who was keeping the readers of the Illustrated London news informed of the events of the war with pen and pencil, with both of whom we were to spend many pleawe received from our kind friends, Mr D. and his family, numberless proofs of their great satisfaction in having us near them. In accordance with his promise, Mr Vizetelly came now to pay us a longer visit, unaccompanied, however, to our regret, by Mr Lawley, who had been obliged to go to Richmond for the purpose of sending off hall the play of the features in his rehearsal, we proceeded to our great central camp-fire, there to renew the negro dances to the music of the banjoscenes which Vizetelly's clever pencil has placed before the European public in the pages of the Illustrated London news. Less successful was our friend in his efforts to improve the
Hardeman Stuart (search for this): chapter 10
to Pennsylvania. life at the Bower during General Stuart's absence. the General's own report of thaff, and was now under orders to report to General Stuart, and we had again a pleasant little militae, by the Federal cavalry in Virginia. General Stuart gave me a gratifying proof that he had beeding. As I am fortunate enough to have General Stuart's own official report in Ms. of this memor All now went merrily again at The Bower. General Stuart, who had been blessed with the satisfactios country, drawn by fat Pennsylvania horses. Stuart was, of course, the hero of the occasion, and , near the small hamlet of Kearneysville. General Stuart had already with great promptness reported had been dismounted as sharpshooters, and General Stuart and myself endeavoured to place them to thrier, but as there was no possible escape from Stuart's challenge, I struck my spurs into his sides,y soon afterwards the opportunity of bantering Stuart, when he could say and do nothing in reply. R[12 more...]
One or two of my men lost their way, and are probably in the hands of the enemy. I marched from Chambersburg to Leesburg, 90 miles, with only one hour's halt, in thirty-six hours, including a forced passage of the Potomac — a march without a parallel in history. The results of this expedition, in a moral and political point of view, can hardly be estimated, and the consternation among property-holders in Pennsylvania was beyond description. I am specially indebted to Captain B. I. White (C. S. Cavalry) and to Messrs Hugh Logan and Harbaugh, whose skilful guidance was of immense service to me. My Staff are entitled to the highest praise for untiring energy in the discharge of their duties. I enclose a map of the expedition, drawn by Captain W. W. Blackford to accompany this report; also a copy of orders enforced during the march. Believing that the hand of God was clearly manifested in the signal deliverance of my command from danger and the crowning success attendi
k, I crossed the Monocacy, and continued the march throughout the night, via Liberty, New Market, and Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of communication with Washington, but we found only a few waggons to capture, and pushed on to Barnesville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard before, that Stoneman had between four and five thousand troops about Poolesville and guarding the river fords. I started directly for Poolesville, but instead of marching upon that point, I avoided it by a march through the woods, leaving it two or three miles to my left, and getting into the road from Poolesville to the mouth of the Monocacy. Guarding well my flanks and rear, I pushed boldly forward, meeting the head of the enemy's force going towards Poolesville. I ordered the charge, which was responded t
Bob Sweeney (search for this): chapter 10
f horses, and also learned that our daring band of horsemen was already on its rapid return to Virginia. I availed myself of the opportunity while in Shepherdstown of paying my respects to Mrs L., by whom and the other ladies of her household I was welcomed with the utmost kindness. On the morning of the 13th General Stuart arrived again safely at The Bower, heralding his approach from afar by the single bugler he had with him, whose notes were somewhat oddly mingled with the thrum of Sweeney's banjo. Our delight in being again together was unspeakable, and was greatly enhanced by the glorious issue of the expedition. Many prisoners had been taken; he had secured large numbers of horses and mules, and he had inflicted great material damage upon the enemy. All my comrades had mounted themselves on fresh horses, and they came back with wonderful accounts of their adventures across the border, what terror and consternation had possessed the burly Dutch farmers of Pennsylvania, a
e soldiers of the enemy that took him-provoked, probably, by his proud bearing-had illtreated him in the extreme; but he soon met officers whom he had known before the war in the regular army, and afterwards fared better. On the 10th arrived Major Terrell, who had formerly served on General Robertson's staff, and was now under orders to report to General Stuart, and we had again a pleasant little military family at our headquarters. From General Stuart we heard nothing for several days. T neither of us sustained any damage by this rude winding — up of our romantic conversation. The horses were reasonable enough not to run off, and we quietly continued our drive to headquarters, but we talked no more sentiment on the way. Major Terrell, having been ordered to Winchester in attendance on a court-martial, had left his excellent horses to my exclusive use, and my own animals, enlarged in number by the addition of the stout Pennsylvanian, had very much improved by their long r
en a few carbine-shots had been exchanged. This squadron had come from Harper's Ferry, along a by-road which struck the turnpike at a point about midway between Kearneysville and Smithfield, which point they had reached just ten minutes after General Lee with a very small escort had passed by. Our Commander-in-Chief had thus very narrowly escaped falling into the hands of the enemy, and I thought it necessary to despatch a courier at once to General Stuart to inform him that the road was not cvisited the place in our absence would have supposed that any change had occurred in the interim. The Federal army, after considerable fighting the previous day, had recrossed the Potomac, their rearguard being badly cut up by a dashing charge of Lee's cavalry. The Federal newspapers called the movement a grand and successful reconnaissance in force, and it had evidently been undertaken to counteract a little the effect, and abate the ill-feeling, that had been produced all over the North by
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