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they had time to take steady aim, the bullets that came whizzing after me flying far wide of the mark. On my return to the spot where I had left Stuart, I found him, with Jackson and the officers of their respective Staffs, stretched out along the grass beneath a gigantic oak, and tranquilly discussing their plans for the impending battle, which both seemed confidently to regard as likely to end in a great and important victory for our arms. Towards five o'clock Jackson's adjutant, Major Pendleton, galloped up to us and reported that the line of battle was formed, and all was in readiness for immediate attack. Accordingly the order was at once given for the whole corps to advance. All hastened forthwith to their appointed posts-General Stuart and his Staff joining the cavalry, which was to operate on the left of our infantry. Scarcely had we got up to our men when the Confederate yell, which always preceded a charge, burst forth along our lines, and Jackson's veterans, who had
Hardeman Stuart (search for this): chapter 22
wn up in line of battle to oppose our advance, Stuart at once ordered the 1st regiment of cavalry toad with dead and wounded. That Jackson and Stuart with their officers escaped was nothing short her our wounded comrade had been conveyed, General Stuart accompanied us thither to look after his c On my return to the spot where I had left Stuart, I found him, with Jackson and the officers ofastened forthwith to their appointed posts-General Stuart and his Staff joining the cavalry, which wtreat would be in the direction of Ely's Ford, Stuart was ordered to proceed at once towards that pory about two miles from the ford. Riding with Stuart a little ahead of our men, I suddenly discovernd communicated something in a low tone to General Stuart, by which he seemed greatly startled and a back to the colonel, while, anxious to rejoin Stuart as soon as possible, I galloped on ahead throusarily postponed until the following morning. Stuart's position was one of undoubted difficulty, hi[10 more...]
Channing Price (search for this): chapter 22
at the enemy's cannon had full time to continue its havoc to a most fearful extent, covering the road with dead and wounded. That Jackson and Stuart with their officers escaped was nothing short of miraculous, the only exception being Major Channing Price of our Staff, who was struck a few paces from me by a piece of shell. Poor fellow! imagining that, as no bone was broken, the wound was not dangerous, he remained at his post till he fainted in his saddle from the loss of blood, and had ition of our encampment being quite close to the house whither our wounded comrade had been conveyed, General Stuart accompanied us thither to look after his comforts and nurse him during the night. Sad was the intelligence that awaited us; poor Price was dying. The fragment of shell had severed a principal artery, and, the bleeding not having been stopped in time, he was rapidly and hopelessly sinking. It was a cruel spectacle to see the gallant young fellow stretched on his deathbed surrou
om my reveries, to summon me to new scenes of death and destruction. All was bustle and activity as I galloped along the lines, on the morning of the 2d, to obtain, according to Stuart's orders, the latest instructions for our cavalry from General Lee, who was located at a distance of some miles to our right. Anderson's and McLaws's sharpshooters were advancing, and already exchanging shots with the enemy's skirmishers-the line of battle of these two divisions having been partially extendemy's lines that the stroke of axes, mingled with the hum of voices from their camps, was distinctly audible. Thus commenced the famous flank march which, more than any other operation of the war, proved the brilliant strategical talents of General Lee, and the consummate ability of his lieutenant. About two o'clock a body of Federal cavalry came in sight, making, however, but slight show of resistance, and falling back slowly before us. By about four o'clock we had completed our movement w
ly at Richmond, who had become dear friends of mine, I wandered about all through that mild night of May, until the sounding bugle and the rolling drums roused me from my reveries, to summon me to new scenes of death and destruction. All was bustle and activity as I galloped along the lines, on the morning of the 2d, to obtain, according to Stuart's orders, the latest instructions for our cavalry from General Lee, who was located at a distance of some miles to our right. Anderson's and McLaws's sharpshooters were advancing, and already exchanging shots with the enemy's skirmishers-the line of battle of these two divisions having been partially extended over the space previously occupied by Jackson's corps, that they might cover its movements. This splendid corps, meanwhile, was marching in close columns in a direction which set us all wondering what could be the intentions of old Stonewall; but as we beheld him riding along, heading the troops himself, we should as soon have tho
s own brother, who had joined us but a few months before, leant over him to the last, watching in silent agony the pitiless progress of death. About midnight our dear friend breathed his last, and General Stuart advised us to seek some rest against the work of the ensuing day, but no sleep could I find. My heart full of grief, and my thoughts busy with memories of the departed and of his family at Richmond, who had become dear friends of mine, I wandered about all through that mild night of May, until the sounding bugle and the rolling drums roused me from my reveries, to summon me to new scenes of death and destruction. All was bustle and activity as I galloped along the lines, on the morning of the 2d, to obtain, according to Stuart's orders, the latest instructions for our cavalry from General Lee, who was located at a distance of some miles to our right. Anderson's and McLaws's sharpshooters were advancing, and already exchanging shots with the enemy's skirmishers-the line
ed us to seek some rest against the work of the ensuing day, but no sleep could I find. My heart full of grief, and my thoughts busy with memories of the departed and of his family at Richmond, who had become dear friends of mine, I wandered about all through that mild night of May, until the sounding bugle and the rolling drums roused me from my reveries, to summon me to new scenes of death and destruction. All was bustle and activity as I galloped along the lines, on the morning of the 2d, to obtain, according to Stuart's orders, the latest instructions for our cavalry from General Lee, who was located at a distance of some miles to our right. Anderson's and McLaws's sharpshooters were advancing, and already exchanging shots with the enemy's skirmishers-the line of battle of these two divisions having been partially extended over the space previously occupied by Jackson's corps, that they might cover its movements. This splendid corps, meanwhile, was marching in close columns
May 2nd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
Chapter 21: Fight near the Furnace. narrow escape of Jackson and Stuart. Jackson's flank march. first battle of the Wilderness, 2d May 1863. After doing a large amount of sleep in a very short time, we started again, considerably refreshed, for Spotsylvania Court-house, to join our cavalry there, and take up our position on Jackson's left. Towards eight o'clock, our entire army commenced a forward movement on the enemy, who had only a few isolated detachments posted in our immediate front. With these a few lively skirmishes occurred, as we encountered them in succession, and drove them gradually before us upon the main body of their troops. For many miles round the country was covered with dense forest, with only occasional patches of open space, so that we made but slow progress, and in many places our cavalry and artillery had to surmount considerable difficulties in their advance. At about four o'clock we reached a place called The Furnace, from some producti
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