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Longstreet (search for this): chapter 24
enemy; but were actively employed in preparations for the summer campaign, and in reorganising our whole army, the ranks of which were rapidly filled by the return of the absentees, and strengthened by the arrival of numerous reinforcements-Longstreet having been recalled with his two divisions from North Carolina, and several brigades joined to these from Beauregard's army. The army of Northern Virginia was now divided into three equal and distinct corps, each numbering about 20,000 men. Longstreet commanded the 1st corps, consisting of Hood's, McLaws's, and Picket's divisions; Ewell the 2d, consisting of Early's, Rodes's, and Johnson's divisions, formerly under Jackson's command, and now committed to this general in accordance with a request made by Stonewall on his deathbed, in his solicitude for the welfare of his veterans. The 3d corps was placed under the command of A. P. Hill, and was formed of Anderson's, Pender's, and Heth's divisions. The cavalry, which had also been stre
magnificent style that an enthusiastic shout of applause rose along our lines on the heights, whence the conflict could be plainly witnessed. The enemy received us with a shower of bullets. General William Lee fell wounded in the thigh. Colonel Williams was shot dead at the head of his regiment, and many other officers fell killed and wounded. But nothing could arrest the impetuous charge of the gallant Virginians; and in a few minutes the Federal lines were broken and driven in disorderly who but a few days before had gaily attended the review, were now stretched cold and lifeless on the same ground. Among those whose death we mourned, was the gallant Colonel Hampton of the 2d South Carolina, brother of General Hampton, and Colonel Williams of the 2d North Carolina; General William Lee, Colonel Butler, and many other officers of rank, were among the wounded. Our Staff had suffered very severely: Captain White wounded, Lieutenant Goldsborough taken prisoner, and the gallant Cap
Goldsborough (search for this): chapter 24
ly-bought one on our side, and numbers of those who but a few days before had gaily attended the review, were now stretched cold and lifeless on the same ground. Among those whose death we mourned, was the gallant Colonel Hampton of the 2d South Carolina, brother of General Hampton, and Colonel Williams of the 2d North Carolina; General William Lee, Colonel Butler, and many other officers of rank, were among the wounded. Our Staff had suffered very severely: Captain White wounded, Lieutenant Goldsborough taken prisoner, and the gallant Captain Farley killed. Poor Farley! after innumerable escapes from the perils into which his brilliant gallantry led him, his fate had overtaken him at last, and he died as heroically as he had lived. While riding towards the enemy, side by side with Colonel Butler, a shell which passed clean through their horses, killed both these, shattered at the same time one of Butler's legs below the knee, and carried off one of Farley's close up to the body
Hardeman Stuart (search for this): chapter 24
ips and fatigues we had already undergone, General Stuart acceded to my friend's invitation to make y letters of condolence and offers received by Stuart on my account, greatly to his amusement, a req the former Secretary of War, a warm friend of Stuart's and mine, and to whom it will be remembered ten o'clock the marching past commenced. General Stuart had taken up his position on a slight eminther to the rear. It was evident, both to General Stuart and myself, that the intentions of the Fedry by a united charge of our whole force. But Stuart's ardour was impatient of delay; and being, beeating foe. I was not long in meeting with General Stuart, whom I found directing the operations frones's brigade was drawn up to support it, when Stuart, thinking the time had come for an aggressive this, however, to prevent my accompanying General Stuart on the following morning on a ride towardsillanous trick. I had been the subject of General Stuart's raillery apropos of my lost horses, but [7 more...]
William Lee (search for this): chapter 24
ond. Leaving one of his brigades to occupy William Lee's command, the General, with a body of seveisions, commanded by Hampton, Fitz Lee, and William Lee. About the 18th of May, General Lee, who haGeneral Lee, who had continued to confront the enemy at Fredericksburg, began gradually to shift the position of his tdivision, on the 7th we marched by order of General Lee, who was now among us, closer to the Rappahf the body of couriers whom I took with me. William Lee's brigade was placed on a ridge of hills, w on the heights. Buried in the deep grass, William Lee and I lay close to our guns watching the pr Thither I hastened off at once, promising General Lee to send him information as soon as I had difurther accident, at the point of destination. Lee's and Jones's men received the order to charge received us with a shower of bullets. General William Lee fell wounded in the thigh. Colonel Wilonel Williams of the 2d North Carolina; General William Lee, Colonel Butler, and many other officer[2 more...]
this magnificent body of troops; and as a review had been ordered for the 5th of June, all the commencement of the month we were busy preparing for that important event. Invitations having been sent out to the whole circle of our acquaintances far and near, the hotels of the town, and as many private houses as had any accommodation to spare, were got ready for the reception of our guests, many of whom, after all, we had to put under tents. Among those we expected on this occasion, was General Randolph, the former Secretary of War, a warm friend of Stuart's and mine, and to whom it will be remembered I was indebted for so much kindness on my first arrival in Richmond. Gladly eager to give him a proof of my esteem, and the sense I had of his kindness, I started off on the morning of the 4th for Gordonsville, to meet our friend on his road, and I had the pleasure of bringing him by special train into Culpepper with all honours, our battle-flag floating from the locomotive. Every train
cksburg, General Stuart and his Staff started with Fitz Lee's brigade towards Spotsylvania Court-house, where in the morning calling me up to ride with him to General Lee's, whose headquarters were fixed in the old spotater we were making our way through the woods with Fitz Lee's brigade in the direction of Gordonsville. After, a request was despatched by Governor Letcher to General Lee to have my body forwarded, and claiming the privionours of the State of Virginia. To this demand, General Lee sent the following characteristic reply: Can't sperry talk and laughter round the camp-fires. For General Lee his admiration and affection were alike unboundeden say, All the credit of my successes belongs to General Lee; they were his plans on which I acted, and I only executed his orders. But General Lee knew full well how to appreciate the great military qualities of his liete corps of three divisions, commanded by Hampton, Fitz Lee, and William Lee. About the 18th of May, General L
ch were rapidly filled by the return of the absentees, and strengthened by the arrival of numerous reinforcements-Longstreet having been recalled with his two divisions from North Carolina, and several brigades joined to these from Beauregard's army. The army of Northern Virginia was now divided into three equal and distinct corps, each numbering about 20,000 men. Longstreet commanded the 1st corps, consisting of Hood's, McLaws's, and Picket's divisions; Ewell the 2d, consisting of Early's, Rodes's, and Johnson's divisions, formerly under Jackson's command, and now committed to this general in accordance with a request made by Stonewall on his deathbed, in his solicitude for the welfare of his veterans. The 3d corps was placed under the command of A. P. Hill, and was formed of Anderson's, Pender's, and Heth's divisions. The cavalry, which had also been strengthened by several new brigades from the South, was formed into a separate corps of three divisions, commanded by Hampton, Fi
General Robertson had joined us with his splendid brigade from North Carolina, as also had General Jones, with his command from the valley of Virginia; and nearly all the men of Hampton's division river in strong force at several points, and pressed forward so rapidly that they had come upon Jones's brigade before the greater part of the men had had time to saddle their horses. It was fortunies in position upon an eminence which I had just passed, and was reaching a patch of wood where Jones's men were engaged in a sharp skirmish with the Federals, when in overwhelming numbers they mades pursuers. This splendid command could just be seen emerging from the woods on our left, where Jones's brigade was drawn up to support it, when Stuart, thinking the time had come for an aggressive ide, and in a few minutes was, without further accident, at the point of destination. Lee's and Jones's men received the order to charge with loud cheers-the former moving forward to the attack in s
division had returned from South Carolina and Mississippi. Our horse-artillery, under command of Pelham's successor, Major Berkham, had been augmented by several batteries, and the old ones had been supplied with fresh horses, so that altogether wey mounted, having, besides my new purchase, which was still left me, two fine chargers — a stout bay which I had from Major Berkham, the chief of our horse-artillery, in exchange for my captured Yankee horse, and my old black, which was now in finepidly reconnoitre the state of affairs, while he would follow as quickly as the troops could be brought into action. Major Berkham had hastily placed some of his batteries in position upon an eminence which I had just passed, and was reaching a pat while with loud shouts of victory a dense mass of Federal horsemen broke froth from the woods. At this critical moment Berkham opened a rapid fire, throwing such a shower of canister and grape at close range upon the pursuing host, that they recoi
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