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left Fort Scott with the following troops as an escort: One company of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, company C Ninth Kansas cavalry; six companies of the Second Colorado infantry; one section of Blair's battery, and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer. This force and the train reached Baxter Springs, on the 26th of June, where they were joined by Major Foreman of this division, with the six hundred men and one twelve-pound howitzer, which I have already mentioned as having left here on the 20th ultimo. This force and train moved fifteen miles south of Baxter to Hudson's Ford on Neosho River, where they were detained two days on account of high waters. While they were thus detained, Colonel J. M. Williams, commanding the colored regiment at Baxter Springs, received information which led him to believe that the escort and train would certainly be attacked on the way down, and perhaps within a day or two after they crossed the Neosho River, by a large force of the enemy. He, therefor
the suspense a National salute fired in honor of Independence day beef and beans for barbecue the pinch of hunger horses and dead rebels floating in the River two days fighting at Cabin Creek gallant charge of the colored regiment total rout of the enemy how the Federal troops crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival of supply train at Fort Gibson. The rebel pickets shouted across the river on the 24th instant, that our commissary train was on the way down, and that Colonel Dodd was commanding the escort to it, which is composed of two infantry regiments and four pieces of artillery. This is really news to our officers here, as we have not heard what troops and how strong a force would guard it down. Our hostile neighbors across the river seem to be better informed of the movements of our train and troops in the country above than we are. Livingston, the guerrilla chieftain, whom I have freq
at each station, well armed and mounted on good horses, I believe that the enemy's dispatch bearers could be captured. A large part of the remaining force of the enemy on the south side of the Arkansas made a movement in some direction on the 25th. Their pickets intimate that this force has marched out to join the cavalry General Cooper sent out a few days ago to attack our train. That their pickets should venture to refer to the movements of this force in connection with our train looks are perfectly advised of all their movements. It is now reported by our scouts that most of the enemy's camp has been removed back to Elk Creek, some twenty miles south of this post. This explains the activity noticed in their camp on the 25th instant. Should we endeavor to cross the river and compel the flight of the detachments guarding the different fords, they would endeavor to warn their baggage trains at Elk Creek by signals, so that they could be moving south, several hours before
Elk Creek by signals, so that they could be moving south, several hours before we could reach that point. The troops of this division, however, are too busily engaged elsewhere to make a dash on the enemy's camp. The rebel pickets on Sunday, 28th instant, stated that they had just heard that the Confederate army in the east, under General Lee, has recently gained a great victory over the Federal army, and that our army has fallen back to the immediate vicinity of Washington. They also stahat they feel so sure of success, that they will not leave a way open for retreat. A deserter from the rebel command, now encamped on Elk Creek, was brought in this morning, July 1st, and he states that just before he left the enemy on the 28th ultimo, General Cooper had sent out another division of cavalry to join the force that had gone out several days previous. He says that they are very confident of success this time, as they have made great preparations, and are well advised of the
since they crossed the Neosho River at Hudson's ford. But we may now go back of the Neosho River to Fort Scott, and trace the progress of the train to Fort Blunt or Gibson. The train left Fort Scott with the following troops as an escort: One company of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, company C Ninth Kansas cavalry; six companies of the Second Colorado infantry; one section of Blair's battery, and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer. This force and the train reached Baxter Springs, on the 26th of June, where they were joined by Major Foreman of this division, with the six hundred men and one twelve-pound howitzer, which I have already mentioned as having left here on the 20th ultimo. This force and train moved fifteen miles south of Baxter to Hudson's Ford on Neosho River, where they were detained two days on account of high waters. While they were thus detained, Colonel J. M. Williams, commanding the colored regiment at Baxter Springs, received information which led him to believe
h so as sheep and cattle; yet the thought of having to use their flesh for food, would almost derange the appetite of those who are not even getting their full rations. If our imaginations did not act so powerfully on our stomachs, I cannot see why the flesh of these animals, if slaughtered in good healthy condition, should not be as wholesome as beef and mutton. But there is an old saying, That which is one man's food, is another man's poison. Grand River has risen considerably since June 29th, and we hear that there have been heavy rains in the direction of southern Kansas recently. The rise in the river that is just commencing here now, is probably from the same rains that caused the big rise in the Neosho, and detained our train there several days. How this rise in the Grand River will affect the operations of the two opposing forces above here, we will know in a few days. Two Indian women came into our camp July 1st from a section about fifteen miles north of Tahlaqua
ll the positions between Flat Rock and Cabin Creek, and to select the one which would be the most advantageous for making the attack. An experienced engineer officer accompanied them, so that nothing should be laking to make the organization of the expedition complete. Well, from all the information we have been able to obtain, it is regarded as certain that the enemy's forces have converged at a point about forty miles above here in the neighborhood of Cabin Creek, yesterday evening (June 30th). Our train and escort, according to our calculation, should arrive there July 1st, perhaps in the afternoon. The contest for the prize will soon have been settled. As it is now eleven days since Major Foreman left here with his force of six hundred men and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer, he has had ample time to march as far north as Hudson's Ford on the Neosho, or perhaps to Baxter Spring, fifteen miles still further north. In either event he will probably advise Colonel Williams,
he operations of the two opposing forces above here, we will know in a few days. Two Indian women came into our camp July 1st from a section about fifteen miles north of Tahlaquah, and they report that a large force of the enemy, composed of cavae a way open for retreat. A deserter from the rebel command, now encamped on Elk Creek, was brought in this morning, July 1st, and he states that just before he left the enemy on the 28th ultimo, General Cooper had sent out another division of cad of Cabin Creek, yesterday evening (June 30th). Our train and escort, according to our calculation, should arrive there July 1st, perhaps in the afternoon. The contest for the prize will soon have been settled. As it is now eleven days since Majorrched in such order that it would almost have been impossible for the enemy to surprise them. In the afternoon of Wednesday, July 1st, our train and escort arrived on the heights on the north side of Cabin Creek. The stream, where the old military
hey have near relatives in the Third Indian regiment. Colonel Phillips has watched over the Indians with such solicitude, that the men, women and children regard him almost, if not quite, with real affection. They show commendable zeal, too, in keeping him advised of the movements of the enemy. And from my own observations since I have been with this command, I believe it would have been impossible for any other officer to have won such affectionate regard from these Indians. To-day (July 3rd) was very quiet along the Arkansas; the enemy's pickets were in suspense as well as our troops at this post. They do not even seem to have heard of the artillery and musketry firing of Wednesday evening. Or if they have, they do not care to say anything about it. If the commanding officer of the expedition has sent any dispatches back to General Cooper at Elk Creek, it is not likely that they show anything definite to have been accomplished when the courier left. The different scouting pa
ldiers, for at one or two points they floated near enough to shore to see whether they had on blue blouses or sky-blue trousers. A good many conjectures were advanced as to whether they were recently friends or foes, and how they came to get drowned. The mystery of their deaths, however, will probably be cleared up in a few days, when we shall have been better informed of the operations of the two, opposing forces on the river north of us. The train and escort arrived at Fort Gibson, July 5th, just before twelve o'clock, although .we heard, early in the morning, that they would get in during the day. I made a good many inquiries concerning the cause of delay since they crossed the Neosho River at Hudson's ford. But we may now go back of the Neosho River to Fort Scott, and trace the progress of the train to Fort Blunt or Gibson. The train left Fort Scott with the following troops as an escort: One company of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, company C Ninth Kansas cavalry; six compa
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