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Saline county (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
artillery with them, undertook to defend their stations, and were surrounded and attacked with it at short range, and compelled to surrender. Their losses, however, by capture have been quite light. Shelby has moved through Missouri very rapidly, having met with no serious opposition at first. But he had marched only a few days through the State when he ran into a hornet's nest. General Brown, commanding the State militia in Central Missouri, attacked him at Marshall a small town in Saline county, on the 13th instant, and after two hours hard fighting, captured all his artillery, and dispersed his men in every direction. The enemy lost twenty men killed and a large number wounded, and a few prisoners. Nearly all the militia in southwest Missouri have joined the chase. General Ewing, commanding District of the Border, including border counties of Missouri, has taken the field in person, and is determined to press the enemy vigorously until they are driven from the State. L
Webber Falls (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
my supplies, and only a few miles from the State line, it is thought that Shelby may turn aside and attack us here in a few days. But we have one battery, beside four twenty-four pound siege guns, and troops enough to hold the place several days against an enemy of two thousand men. The heights to the east of us, should the enemy get possession of them, would give him positions from which he could throw shells into the town. General Blunt has sent orders for the troops stationed at Webber's Falls and Skullyville to move into Fort Smith, and all the Indian troops stationed at different points in the Nation to concentrate at Fort Gibson. If Colonel Phillips has returned to take command of the Indian division, we need have no fears of the enemy capturing Fort Gibson. It is reported that General Shelby, with the assistance of his artillery, has been able to capture one or two posts in southwest Missouri. The militia, not being aware that the enemy had artillery with them, undertoo
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
im from the localities through which he passes. We shall not complain if he takes from the State every bushwhacker and rebel sympathizer in it. Several couriers who have just arrived from Fort Gibson state that Quantrell's force crossed the Arkansas River about a week ago, a few miles above that post. They surprised and killed six Indian soldiers and two or three negroes near the mouth of the Verdigris River. One of the negroes which they captured they intended to take with them to Texas. He a firm footing at Fort Smith, and will be able to hold western Arkansas and the Indian country, unless our officers make some unpardonable blunder. It is not likely that General Marmaduke will be permitted to occupy the country north of the Arkansas River much longer. Should he endeavor to confine his operations to the central or eastern portion of the State, north of the river, General Steele, commanding an army at Little Rock, should be able to send a force against him and compel him to lea
Fort Smith (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
General Blunt, Staff and escort start to Fort Smith two soldiers killed near Fort Scott by the speaks in Fort Scott-General Blunt starts to Fort Smith again. General Blunt and Staff, his fine this post the evening of the 4th inst., for Fort Smith via Fort Gibson. His escort is made up of d Webber's Falls and Skullyville to move into Fort Smith, and all the Indian troops stationed at diffeneral Blunt of the command of the troops at Fort Smith. It is not thought by a good many that Geneupply train started on the 28th instant for Fort Smith; General Blunt accompanies it. The escort isd left Springfield about three days ago, for Fort Smith, and will not likely leave undisturbed any c It appears from dispatches received from Fort Smith that the scattered forces of Generals Cooperer of troops to make a demonstration against Fort Smith, it is not at all probable that they can orgle advantage. We have got a firm footing at Fort Smith, and will be able to hold western Arkansas a[1 more...]
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
dispatches received from Fort Smith that the scattered forces of Generals Cooper, Marmaduke and Shelby are reorganizing, and making preparations to march against that place with about nine thousand men and eighteen pieces of field artillery. But when we take into account the badly demoralized condition of Cooper's and Shelby's forces, we may conclude that such an army cannot be called into existence in a few days, nor even in a few weeks. While; the rebel Generals in Arkansas and the Indian Territory may be able shortly to collect together a sufficient number of troops to make a demonstration against Fort Smith, it is not at all probable that they can organize an army very soon of such strength as will enable them to make a successful assault, assuming of course that all our troops in the vicinity of that place have been concentrated there, and would be handled to the best possible advantage. We have got a firm footing at Fort Smith, and will be able to hold western Arkansas and t
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
nant Pond at Baxter Springs the invasion of Missouri by General Shelby, with two thousand cavalry ting. No loyal man in the Border.Counties of Missouri can stop at his home a single night without gn as to whether the enemy are about to invade Missouri in force, I think that I have learned enough n that Shelby, Gordon and Hunter have invaded Missouri, with a force of about two thousand men and tal Brown, commanding the State militia in Central Missouri, attacked him at Marshall a small town inew prisoners. Nearly all the militia in southwest Missouri have joined the chase. General Ewing, cn their way to Texas, and would not return to Missouri until towards spring. They regarded General at this post. The border tier of counties of Missouri, as far south as Barton county, will be incluvery sensibly, the scheme of his crusade into Missouri, as he did not refer to it directly. It woule storm that has swept over southwest and central Missouri has now nearly subsided. A retrospect of[7 more...]
Marshall, Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
had marched only a few days through the State when he ran into a hornet's nest. General Brown, commanding the State militia in Central Missouri, attacked him at Marshall a small town in Saline county, on the 13th instant, and after two hours hard fighting, captured all his artillery, and dispersed his men in every direction. Thf having requisitions for ammunition, quartermaster and commissary supplies, filled and sent forward at the earliest practicable moment. After the engagement at Marshall, most of Shelby's force retreated in a westward direction, and soon came in contact with General Ewing's forces. The State troops under General Brown did not stop the pursuit after the fight at Marshall, but are co-operating with General Ewing with hope of capturing Shelby's entire force. While our troops will not likely capture a very large proportion of the raiding force, they will prevent it from taking much property from the State. From the turn affairs have taken, it is thought th
Barton (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
hought that the recent disaster would lessen the confidence of the soldiers in him. He will go down with the supply train in a few days at any rate, though it may be for the purpose of turning over his command. If, however, he desires to keep his command, Senator Lane will doubtless use his influence in his behalf. General Thomas Ewing has been assigned to the command of the District of Kansas, with headquarters at this post. The border tier of counties of Missouri, as far south as Barton county, will be included in his district, He is expected to assume command of his new district in a few days, or just as soon as he returns from the expedition in pursuit of Shelby's raiders. Major W. C. Ransom, of the Sixth Kansas Cavalry, arrived here on the 23d, with about four hundred men, direct from General Ewing's command, which he left at Neosho, Missouri. He has come up for ammunition and other supplies for the troops with General Ewing. He reports our men short of almost everyt
Fort Gibson (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
left this post the evening of the 4th inst., for Fort Smith via Fort Gibson. His escort is made up of detachments from the Fourteenth Kansaels, he will reach Baxter Springs on the evening of the 5th, and Fort Gibson two days later. Two soldiers of the Fourteenth Kansas cavalrBlunt's carriage with him, and marched south in the direction of Fort Gibson, and Shelby's men marched northward, and were, perhaps, the forcps stationed at different points in the Nation to concentrate at Fort Gibson. If Colonel Phillips has returned to take command of the Indian division, we need have no fears of the enemy capturing Fort Gibson. It is reported that General Shelby, with the assistance of his artillerl sympathizer in it. Several couriers who have just arrived from Fort Gibson state that Quantrell's force crossed the Arkansas River about a with them to Texas. He escaped one night, however, and reached Fort Gibson after several day's wandering in the Nation. He states that he
Cassville (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
s misfortune, and probably feels that the eyes of the public are severely upon him. He knows that an officer whom the Government trusts with the lives of thousands of men, is expected to see to it that their lives shall not be wantonly or stupidly sacrificed by placing them in positions where they must contend with the foe under extraordinary disadvantages. General Ewing--and Staff and Escort arrived here October 27th, from Neosho, Missouri, having chased Shelby's flying columns beyond Cassville, and within a few miles of the Arkansas line. The enemy kept breaking up into so many small detachments, that there was not much of a force to pursue towards the last. The troops are all returning, and will go to their regular stations, since the storm that has swept over southwest and central Missouri has now nearly subsided. A retrospect of the recent military operations in Missouri shows that the enemy have lost more by the invasion than they gained. The supply train started on t
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