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Missouri (Missouri, United States) 332 0 Browse Search
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Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
a corporal's guard to pursue, he will perhaps continue to follow them far into Arkansas. There is some talk now that General John McNeil, who has for several montchased Shelby's flying columns beyond Cassville, and within a few miles of the Arkansas line. The enemy kept breaking up into so many small detachments, that there w leave undisturbed any considerable force of the enemy that might be in northwestern Arkansas. On account of the rain and snow-storm which has prevailed in this secxistence in a few days, nor even in a few weeks. While; the rebel Generals in Arkansas and the Indian Territory may be able shortly to collect together a sufficientntage. We have got a firm footing at Fort Smith, and will be able to hold western Arkansas and the Indian country, unless our officers make some unpardonable blunderst him and compel him to leave that section. Or if he should move into northwestern Arkansas, Generals Blunt and McNiel will look after him very closely, and it is
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
e recent military operations in Missouri shows that the enemy have lost more by the invasion than they gained. The supply train started on the 28th instant for Fort Smith; General Blunt accompanies it. The escort is composed of the Second Kansas colored infantry, two companies of the Fourteenth Kansas cavalry, Captain Smith's battery of light artillery of four rifled guns, one battalion of the Twelfth Kansas infantry, and General Blunt's escort. General McNeil and Colonel Cloud left Springfield about three days ago, for Fort Smith, and will not likely leave undisturbed any considerable force of the enemy that might be in northwestern Arkansas. On account of the rain and snow-storm which has prevailed in this section for several days past, the roads are heavy, and the progress of the train will be slower than usual. And the infantry, too, will find it disagreeable marching. A few days' march, however, will bring them into a region where the roads are firmer. Some of the troop
Vernon (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
aff got into his carriage, the bugle sounded the march and the escort filed out, with its silken guidon gayly flying at the head of the column. He intended to march fifteen to twenty miles that night, and then stop a few hours to refresh his men and animals with food and rest. At the rate he usually travels, he will reach Baxter Springs on the evening of the 5th, and Fort Gibson two days later. Two soldiers of the Fourteenth Kansas cavalry, who were permitted to return home in Vernon County, Missouri, to see their families before starting south with their regiment shortly, were killed on the night of the 4th inst. It is reported that there were upwards of a hundred of the enemy in the party who killed these men. The young lady, a daughter or relative of one of the murdered men, who brought in the information, did not, in the excitement caused by the shooting, ascertain the name of the commanding officer under whom the rebels were acting. No loyal man in the Border.Counties of
Baxter Springs (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
neral Blunt's escort attacked by Quantrell near Baxter Springs, and nearly all killed Colonel Blair with a cawagon the enemy defeated by Lieutenant Pond at Baxter Springs the invasion of Missouri by General Shelby, w At the rate he usually travels, he will reach Baxter Springs on the evening of the 5th, and Fort Gibson two dispatch about one o'clock in the morning from Baxter Springs, stating that General Blunt's escort had been awith Lieutenant Pond, commanding the station at Baxter Springs, arrived here and furnished additional particul about two hundred men, attacked the station at Baxter Springs. But as the companies there under Lieutenant P leading from Fort Scott, about a mile north of Baxter Springs. Along towards five o'clock the guard discover escort supposed that they were the troops from Baxter Springs. As soon as Quantrell was informed of the appr Blair arrived on the morning of the 12th, from Baxter Springs. As General Blunt now has definite information
North Branch Verdigris River (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
dering to our authorities, fully as many men as he is gaining by rebel sympathizers joining him from the localities through which he passes. We shall not complain if he takes from the State every bushwhacker and rebel sympathizer in it. Several couriers who have just arrived from Fort Gibson state that Quantrell's force crossed the Arkansas River about a week ago, a few miles above that post. They surprised and killed six Indian soldiers and two or three negroes near the mouth of the Verdigris River. One of the negroes which they captured they intended to take with them to Texas. He escaped one night, however, and reached Fort Gibson after several day's wandering in the Nation. He states that he heard them say that they were on their way to Texas, and would not return to Missouri until towards spring. They regarded General Blunt's carriage as quite a trophy, and intend to exhibit it to their friends and admirers in Texas. A messenger came in from the Osage Mission, October 2
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
an organize an army very soon of such strength as will enable them to make a successful assault, assuming of course that all our troops in the vicinity of that place have been concentrated there, and would be handled to the best possible advantage. We have got a firm footing at Fort Smith, and will be able to hold western Arkansas and the Indian country, unless our officers make some unpardonable blunder. It is not likely that General Marmaduke will be permitted to occupy the country north of the Arkansas River much longer. Should he endeavor to confine his operations to the central or eastern portion of the State, north of the river, General Steele, commanding an army at Little Rock, should be able to send a force against him and compel him to leave that section. Or if he should move into northwestern Arkansas, Generals Blunt and McNiel will look after him very closely, and it is not thought that he or General Shelby will attempt to make another raid through Missouri at present.
Carthage, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
l towards spring. They regarded General Blunt's carriage as quite a trophy, and intend to exhibit it to their friends and admirers in Texas. A messenger came in from the Osage Mission, October 20th, and reported that there was a small rebel force in the vicinity of that place on the night of the 18th, under Cy Gordon. They committed some petty depredations and then left. On the 18th instant General Ewing's forces overtook and had a skirmish with Shelby's rear guard at Carthage, Jasper county, Missouri, and captured thirty prisoners, including one Major. No better officer could be sent against the enemy in the field than General Ewing. Some stragglers are also being daily picked up. The rebels are said to be much exhausted from constant marching and fighting since they invaded the State. It is difficult to capture a cavalry force or compel it to fight, when its commanding officer does not wish to risk an engagement with his adversary, In his dispatches General Ewing state
Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Chapter 22: General Blunt, Staff and escort start to Fort Smith two soldiers killed near Fort Scott by the enemy signs of an appreaching storm the enemy endeavor to capture or kill the Federal pickets, and to make a dash on Fort ScottFort Scott General Blunt's escort attacked by Quantrell near Baxter Springs, and nearly all killed Colonel Blair with a cavalry force to the rescue members of the band burned in the band wagon the enemy defeated by Lieutenant Pond at Baxter Springs the i driven from the State General John McNeil to take command of the Federal troops at Fort Smith General Lane speaks in Fort Scott-General Blunt starts to Fort Smith again. General Blunt and Staff, his fine band, and everything pertaining to the Hr into their ranks with good effect. But they took the precaution to put a guard out on the military road leading from Fort Scott, about a mile north of Baxter Springs. Along towards five o'clock the guard discovered General Blunt's escort coming i
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
illed six Indian soldiers and two or three negroes near the mouth of the Verdigris River. One of the negroes which they captured they intended to take with them to Texas. He escaped one night, however, and reached Fort Gibson after several day's wandering in the Nation. He states that he heard them say that they were on their way to Texas, and would not return to Missouri until towards spring. They regarded General Blunt's carriage as quite a trophy, and intend to exhibit it to their friends and admirers in Texas. A messenger came in from the Osage Mission, October 20th, and reported that there was a small rebel force in the vicinity of that place on Texas. A messenger came in from the Osage Mission, October 20th, and reported that there was a small rebel force in the vicinity of that place on the night of the 18th, under Cy Gordon. They committed some petty depredations and then left. On the 18th instant General Ewing's forces overtook and had a skirmish with Shelby's rear guard at Carthage, Jasper county, Missouri, and captured thirty prisoners, including one Major. No better officer could be sent against the ene
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
immediately after the enemy opened fire, he could probably have resisted the attack. He may, however, have been pressed too closely to have had time to corral his wagons. Nearly all the members of the band were shot through the head, the band wagon set on fire, and their bodies burned in it. Their scorched and charred remains presented a horrible sight. Nearly all the band were Germans, and several of the ruffians are reported to have exclaimed: This shall be the fate of the lopped-eared Dutch of Lincoln's hirelings Major Curtis' horse was shot under him, and he was shot and killed after having become dismounted. The bodies of Major Curtis, Lieutenant Farr, General Blunt's Judge Advocate, and two soldiers, will arrive here on the 8th, to be sent north. The losses of the enemy in the engagements with Lieutenant Pond and General Blunt, are estimated at about thirteen killed. About a dozen of their men have been found on the field, and they are known to have carried away some o
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