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mishes last May. But Livingston attacks our supply trains, and his numerous predatory actions about unprotected points have given him considerable prominence during the last year. Whenever our troops come upon him with equal, or perhaps; somewhat superior numbers, he never stands, but soon scatters his men in small squads, permitting them sometimes to return to their homes for a few days. But between Neosho and Fort Scott, a distance of eighty miles, there is no point, except a camp on Dry Wood, fourteen miles south of Fort Scott, where we have any troops stationed. This large space of unoccupied country gives a wide field of operations for such an organization as Livingston's. And until we can establish more numerous stations along the western border tier of counties in this State, it will probably be difficult, if not impossible, to entirely break up such guerilla bands and also bushwhacking. To accomplish this object, there are some who favor applying the torch indiscriminate
Neosho (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
warfare sickness and heavy mortality among the Indian refugees at Neosho sick and wounded being removed from Fayetteville to Fort Scott thnty, Missouri, on the Cowskin river, twenty-two miles south west of Neosho, and about the same distance north of our old camp at Maysville. Ton. The active operations of this command, and of the troops at Neosho under Major John A. Foreman, against the guerrillas in this sectionet worsted. On the first instant, a detachment from the command at Neosho had a skirmish with a company of guerillas on Burkhart prairie, twehem sometimes to return to their homes for a few days. But between Neosho and Fort Scott, a distance of eighty miles, there is no point, excebtless engage the attention of legislators. Parties coming from Neosho report that there is a great deal of sickness among the Indian solddanger of being intercepted and captured. Only a few weeks ago, at Neosho, our pickets were fired into one night, as was supposed, by quite a
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Of Captain Gallaher I can speak from personal knowledge, as I have known him since I entered the service. Colonel William F. Cloud, Second Kansas cavalry, who is now in command of the District of Southwest Missouri, with head quarters at Springfield, was at Neosha yesterday, 20th instant, with a detachment of the 7th Missouri State Militia and one company of his own regiment, having been on a scout of several days in search of Livingston's band. If the remainder of General Blunt's division, which separated from us at Elm Springs, is occupying the country around Springfield, it would seem Colonel Phillips' division is now occupying the most advanced position of any of our troops in the west. It would also seem that he is holding a more important position, and actually doing more service than any two brigadier-generals in General Schofield's department. We have here a few illustrations of the manner in which meritorious military service is too often regarded. It is thought by
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
The want of proper sheltering has also probably in many cases contributed to their discomforts and sickness. Home sickness, from being exiles, also doubtless has a depressing influence amongst some of them. Such of the sick and wounded at Fayetteville and in the field hospitals of this division as will bear removing, are being taken to Fort Scott. The General Hospital at that place is better provided with everything essential to their proper care and treatment. The great difficulty is to get them there without increasing too much their suffering. But men convalescing from the effects of wounds, and placed in ambulances, and the ambulances driven carefully, should be taken the distance from Fayetteville to Fort Scott, say one hundred and fifty miles, without great inconvenience, except while en route they should be struck with a change of extremely cold weather, or a storm of sleet or snow. Even then, the heavy woolen blankets with which every soldier is provided, would enable
Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
classes of the enemy the Federals have to deal with bushwhackers guerrillas detachments returning to and leaving the State- the regular forces in our front illustrations-incidents from the expedition to low Jack the battle of Coon Creek Concluding remarks on the Indians. The 12th of February I joined the Indian division at Scott's Mills, McDonald County, Missouri, on the Cowskin river, twenty-two miles south west of Neosho, and about the same distance north of our old camp at Maysville. The bottom lands along the stream are excellent, and there are numerous fine farms, on most of which fine crops were raised last year. The movement of the division to this place is not regarded as retrograde or falling back, bat, simply for the purpose of more easily supplying our animals with forage and provisioning the refugee families with us. The mills here are in very good condition, and daily turn out large quantities of meal and flour, which will do much to relieve the demands o
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
it may be, that after reflection, no one would regret it more keenly than himself. Taking this view of the matter, relieves in a measure our officers of the charge of permitting unnecessary destruction of private property. In all those extraordinary cases where private property has been destroyed by our troops, that clearly should not have been destroyed, the Government should, and probably will, in time, pay for, provided of course, that the parties to whom it belongs are loyal to the United States. I would not destroy even the property of rebel citizens except in cases of military necessity; and then it is not supposable that any demand will ever be made upon the Government for payment. But let us pass from this question which, in a few years, will doubtless engage the attention of legislators. Parties coming from Neosho report that there is a great deal of sickness among the Indian soldiers and their families at that place. Taking into account the number of Indians there,
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ear us. We expected every moment that the enemy were going to open fire upon us, for we could plainly see him coming down the road towards us about half a mile off. We could also see, that when they came to a certain point they seemed to file to their left, which was our right, as we had formed in line. We supposed that they were aiming to turn our right, and General Blunt threw out skirmishers to discover their intentions. Our infantry, consisting of the Ninth and Twelfth regiments from Wisconsin, which had been put into four-mule Government wagons at Fort Scott, had just arrived, but it was now getting dark, and an approaching storm, together with our ignorance of the topographical condition of that section, made it impossible to commence an immediate attack. The rain came down in torrents, and it was soon intensely dark. We quickly discovered, however, that the road half a mile beyond the head of our column diverged, coming toward us, and that the enemy, instead of preparing t
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
present, and, made speeches in regard to the passage of certain laws touching the interests of the Cherokee people. One of the most important measures which they have had under discussion, has for its object the abolition of slavery in the Cherokee Nation at an early day. While slavery has for some generations existed in the Cherokee Nation, it has never existed in that form which characterized the institution in the Southern States. The Indians have been with us now upwards of six months, aCherokee Nation, it has never existed in that form which characterized the institution in the Southern States. The Indians have been with us now upwards of six months, and, from what we have seen, it is doubtless true that slavery of the negroes amongst them has been only in name. They never act towards the Indians with that reserve and sign of respect noticeable when they come into our presence. I am satisfied that the hardships of slavery amongst the Indians were never comparable to the hardships of slavery in the cotton-raising States. It would perhaps be difficult to impress any negro with the idea that there is as great a distance between him and an I
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
le manner. Nor do I believe that such acts on our part would remedy the evil which we wish to extirpate. It seems to me that the enemy could occupy the desolate country all the same, and make his incursions into Kansas and into the counties of Missouri still further to the east. Though my age and position would not, to the minds of many, justify my presuming to criticise the actions of those whose maturer years have given them more varied experiences, and in many things a sounder judgment, yet of military organization, and whose movements are directed by a leader. Most of the leaders of the guerrillas with whom we have to contend, I have frequently heard, hold commissions from the Confederate government, or the fugitive Governor of Missouri. Livingston whom I have already referred to, may be cited as an instance. The function of guerrillas is similar to that of privateers. While the privateer is commissioned by the rebel authorities to prey upon our marine commerce, the guerrill
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
never conscientiously favor such a scheme; nor do I believe that the evil requires such heroic treatment at our hands. I have seen the standing chimneys and smoking ruins of desolated homes of Union people as well as rebels too often to wish to see such scenes renewed in a wholesale manner. Nor do I believe that such acts on our part would remedy the evil which we wish to extirpate. It seems to me that the enemy could occupy the desolate country all the same, and make his incursions into Kansas and into the counties of Missouri still further to the east. Though my age and position would not, to the minds of many, justify my presuming to criticise the actions of those whose maturer years have given them more varied experiences, and in many things a sounder judgment, yet I venture to think that our officers have too often permitted the indiscriminate destruction of private property, which should not have been destroyed, thus causing a needless amount of suffering among those whom we
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