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Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
present, and, made speeches in regard to the passage of certain laws touching the interests of the Cherokee people. One of the most important measures which they have had under discussion, has for its object the abolition of slavery in the Cherokee Nation at an early day. While slavery has for some generations existed in the Cherokee Nation, it has never existed in that form which characterized the institution in the Southern States. The Indians have been with us now upwards of six months, aCherokee Nation, it has never existed in that form which characterized the institution in the Southern States. The Indians have been with us now upwards of six months, and, from what we have seen, it is doubtless true that slavery of the negroes amongst them has been only in name. They never act towards the Indians with that reserve and sign of respect noticeable when they come into our presence. I am satisfied that the hardships of slavery amongst the Indians were never comparable to the hardships of slavery in the cotton-raising States. It would perhaps be difficult to impress any negro with the idea that there is as great a distance between him and an I
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
it may be, that after reflection, no one would regret it more keenly than himself. Taking this view of the matter, relieves in a measure our officers of the charge of permitting unnecessary destruction of private property. In all those extraordinary cases where private property has been destroyed by our troops, that clearly should not have been destroyed, the Government should, and probably will, in time, pay for, provided of course, that the parties to whom it belongs are loyal to the United States. I would not destroy even the property of rebel citizens except in cases of military necessity; and then it is not supposable that any demand will ever be made upon the Government for payment. But let us pass from this question which, in a few years, will doubtless engage the attention of legislators. Parties coming from Neosho report that there is a great deal of sickness among the Indian soldiers and their families at that place. Taking into account the number of Indians there,
Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
classes of the enemy the Federals have to deal with bushwhackers guerrillas detachments returning to and leaving the State- the regular forces in our front illustrations-incidents from the expedition to low Jack the battle of Coon Creek Concluding remarks on the Indians. The 12th of February I joined the Indian division at Scott's Mills, McDonald County, Missouri, on the Cowskin river, twenty-two miles south west of Neosho, and about the same distance north of our old camp at Maysville. The bottom lands along the stream are excellent, and there are numerous fine farms, on most of which fine crops were raised last year. The movement of the division to this place is not regarded as retrograde or falling back, bat, simply for the purpose of more easily supplying our animals with forage and provisioning the refugee families with us. The mills here are in very good condition, and daily turn out large quantities of meal and flour, which will do much to relieve the demands o
Elm Springs (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
with forage and provisioning the refugee families with us. The mills here are in very good condition, and daily turn out large quantities of meal and flour, which will do much to relieve the demands of hunger among the refugees. Since we left Elm Springs as a separate command, Colonel Phillips has steadily grown in popularity with his troops, and we now believe him to be an able and judicious commander. At the end of a month he has made no mistake, but on the contrary has managed the affairs instant, with a detachment of the 7th Missouri State Militia and one company of his own regiment, having been on a scout of several days in search of Livingston's band. If the remainder of General Blunt's division, which separated from us at Elm Springs, is occupying the country around Springfield, it would seem Colonel Phillips' division is now occupying the most advanced position of any of our troops in the west. It would also seem that he is holding a more important position, and actually
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Of Captain Gallaher I can speak from personal knowledge, as I have known him since I entered the service. Colonel William F. Cloud, Second Kansas cavalry, who is now in command of the District of Southwest Missouri, with head quarters at Springfield, was at Neosha yesterday, 20th instant, with a detachment of the 7th Missouri State Militia and one company of his own regiment, having been on a scout of several days in search of Livingston's band. If the remainder of General Blunt's division, which separated from us at Elm Springs, is occupying the country around Springfield, it would seem Colonel Phillips' division is now occupying the most advanced position of any of our troops in the west. It would also seem that he is holding a more important position, and actually doing more service than any two brigadier-generals in General Schofield's department. We have here a few illustrations of the manner in which meritorious military service is too often regarded. It is thought by
Spring River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
nd had two men badly wounded, without inflicting any loss on the enemy as far as is known. The commanding officer of the post, Major Foreman, immediately sent out a larger force, about a hundred men, to the vicinity where the skirmish took place, but it returned to its station after having captured one wagon loaded with plunder, and having chased the enemy several miles through the woods. Captain Theo. Conkey, of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, who has recently been operating along the Spring River, in Jasper County, against the guerillas, had a lively contest a few days ago with Livingston's band, and in the affair, had half a dozen of his men captured. The loss sustained by the enemy, if any, I have been unable to ascertain, as Captain Conkey receives his orders from the commanding officer at Fort Scott. Livingston, we understand, is commissioned by and acting under regular orders from the rebel authorities, and is not accused of killing his prisoners like Quantrell, whose opera
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the guerillas, had a lively contest a few days ago with Livingston's band, and in the affair, had half a dozen of his men captured. The loss sustained by the enemy, if any, I have been unable to ascertain, as Captain Conkey receives his orders from the commanding officer at Fort Scott. Livingston, we understand, is commissioned by and acting under regular orders from the rebel authorities, and is not accused of killing his prisoners like Quantrell, whose operations are confined chiefly to Jackson and Cass counties, and with whom we had a number of skirmishes last May. But Livingston attacks our supply trains, and his numerous predatory actions about unprotected points have given him considerable prominence during the last year. Whenever our troops come upon him with equal, or perhaps; somewhat superior numbers, he never stands, but soon scatters his men in small squads, permitting them sometimes to return to their homes for a few days. But between Neosho and Fort Scott, a distanc
Jasper (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ly wounded, without inflicting any loss on the enemy as far as is known. The commanding officer of the post, Major Foreman, immediately sent out a larger force, about a hundred men, to the vicinity where the skirmish took place, but it returned to its station after having captured one wagon loaded with plunder, and having chased the enemy several miles through the woods. Captain Theo. Conkey, of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, who has recently been operating along the Spring River, in Jasper County, against the guerillas, had a lively contest a few days ago with Livingston's band, and in the affair, had half a dozen of his men captured. The loss sustained by the enemy, if any, I have been unable to ascertain, as Captain Conkey receives his orders from the commanding officer at Fort Scott. Livingston, we understand, is commissioned by and acting under regular orders from the rebel authorities, and is not accused of killing his prisoners like Quantrell, whose operations are confine
Carytown (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
cott the classes of the enemy the Federals have to deal with bushwhackers guerrillas detachments returning to and leaving the State- the regular forces in our front illustrations-incidents from the expedition to low Jack the battle of Coon Creek Concluding remarks on the Indians. The 12th of February I joined the Indian division at Scott's Mills, McDonald County, Missouri, on the Cowskin river, twenty-two miles south west of Neosho, and about the same distance north of our old campeat towards the southern part of the State. We pursued them day and night, giving only a few hours each day to ourselves and to our animals to take food and rest, and struck them with our cavalry about one hundred miles south of Lone Jack at Coon Creek, in which engagement twenty-six men were killed and wounded in the company to which my brother belonged, and, as I have already stated, he was among the wounded. Captain H. S. Green of the Sixth Kansas cavalry was among the severely wounded wh
Jackson County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
osed, by quite a force of the enemy going south, but as they found that we were not to be surprised, decided to make no further demonstration. The enemy returning to the State may have either of two objects in view. He may be intending to follow a guerrilla warfare, or he may be intending to concentrate at some point designated, to make a combined movement against some place occupied by a given number of our troops. A combined movement of this kind he made against Lone Jack in Jackson county, Missouri, on the 15th and 16th of last August, resulting in the defeat of our troops with a heavy loss in killed and wounded, and the capture of a section of the Third Indiana Battery. The following casualties at the battle of Lone Jack on the Federal side, I have gathered from official data : Second battalion Missouri State Militia, killed, enlisted men, 4; wounded, officers, 1 ; enlisted men, 5; missing, officers, 1 ; enlisted men, 5. Sixth Missouri State Militia, killed, enlisted men,
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