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John A. Foreman (search for this): chapter 7
ed the affairs of his District in a manner deserving the warmest commendation. The active operations of this command, and of the troops at Neosho under Major John A. Foreman, against the guerrillas in this section, are beginning to have a wholesome effect. Scarcely a day passes that a squad of rebels do not come in and take thmiles north-west of that post, and had two men badly wounded, without inflicting any loss on the enemy as far as is known. The commanding officer of the post, Major Foreman, immediately sent out a larger force, about a hundred men, to the vicinity where the skirmish took place, but it returned to its station after having capturedt permit our arms to rust. We have very favorable reports from Captain A. C. Spillman of this division, who has been in command of the post at Neosho since Major Foreman left there. Captain Spillman is showing himself to be a very competent and energetic young officer. His scouting parties are active in hunting down bushwhack
Emory S. Foster (search for this): chapter 7
es Seventh Missouri State Militia cavalry, killed, enlisted men, 6 ; wounded, officers, 1; enlisted men, 14 ; missing, enlisted men, 6. Eighth Missouri State Militia cavalry, killed, enlisted men, 9 ; wounded, officers, 2 : enlisted men, 28; missing, enlisted men, 4. Third Indiana battery, killed, enlisted men, 5; Total killed, officers, 2; enlisted men, 51 ; wounded, officers, 13; enlisted men, 144, exclusive of the Third Indiana battery ; missing, officers, 1; enlisted men, 43. Major Emory S. Foster, Seventh Missouri cavalry, who commanded our troops in the engagement, reports that he had about 800 men, and that one-third of this force were killed, wounded and missing. This was one of the most gallant fights of the war, for a small force. The enemy had 2,500 men. We marched day and night from Fort Scott to Lone Jack, to reinforce our troops, but when we arrived on the ground we were mortified to learn that the battle had been fought the day before. The enemy under Generals S
William Gallaher (search for this): chapter 7
n, but also in the selection of officers for his staff as confidential advisers, and also other officers of special fitness for special duties. Probably few officers could be found who would make a better Assistant Adjutant General than Captain William Gallaher, or a better Judge Advocate than Captain Joel Moody. Of Captain Gallaher I can speak from personal knowledge, as I have known him since I entered the service. Colonel William F. Cloud, Second Kansas cavalry, who is now in command ofCaptain Gallaher I can speak from personal knowledge, as I have known him since I entered the service. Colonel William F. Cloud, Second Kansas cavalry, who is now in command of the District of Southwest Missouri, with head quarters at Springfield, was at Neosha yesterday, 20th instant, with a detachment of the 7th Missouri State Militia and one company of his own regiment, having been on a scout of several days in search of Livingston's band. If the remainder of General Blunt's division, which separated from us at Elm Springs, is occupying the country around Springfield, it would seem Colonel Phillips' division is now occupying the most advanced position of any of ou
H. S. Green (search for this): chapter 7
n, had moved around us during the night, and now commenced a hasty retreat towards the southern part of the State. We pursued them day and night, giving only a few hours each day to ourselves and to our animals to take food and rest, and struck them with our cavalry about one hundred miles south of Lone Jack at Coon Creek, in which engagement twenty-six men were killed and wounded in the company to which my brother belonged, and, as I have already stated, he was among the wounded. Captain H. S. Green of the Sixth Kansas cavalry was among the severely wounded while gallantly leading his men. We could not hold the rebel force until the rest of our cavalry, artillery and infantry came up, and this affair practically ended the expedition, though a portion of the cavalry continued the pursuit almost to the southern line of the State. I have entered somewhat into details because we did some extraordinary marching, and also because I wished to point out how an enemy passing us in sma
en men by capture guerrilla chieftains commissioned by the rebel authorities Comments on plans proposed by some to break up the guerrilla warfare sickness and heavy mortality among the Indian refugees at Neosho sick and wounded being removed from Fayetteville to Fort Scott the classes of the enemy the Federals have to deal with bushwhackers guerrillas detachments returning to and leaving the State- the regular forces in our front illustrations-incidents from the expedition to low Jack the battle of Coon Creek Concluding remarks on the Indians. The 12th of February I joined the Indian division at Scott's Mills, McDonald County, Missouri, on the Cowskin river, twenty-two miles south west of Neosho, and about the same distance north of our old camp at Maysville. The bottom lands along the stream are excellent, and there are numerous fine farms, on most of which fine crops were raised last year. The movement of the division to this place is not regarded as retrograde or
Lewis R. Jewell (search for this): chapter 7
on the ground we were mortified to learn that the battle had been fought the day before. The enemy under Generals Shelby and Cockrell were still encamped on the field; but when we came in sight, instead of giving battle, as we anticipated they would after their recent victory, they retreated. It was about six o'clock when we came up, and General Blunt immediately commenced to form his troops in line of battle, as the enemy seemed to be making some kind of hostile movements. I was with Colonel Jewell and General Blunt, and some of his staff were near us. We expected every moment that the enemy were going to open fire upon us, for we could plainly see him coming down the road towards us about half a mile off. We could also see, that when they came to a certain point they seemed to file to their left, which was our right, as we had formed in line. We supposed that they were aiming to turn our right, and General Blunt threw out skirmishers to discover their intentions. Our infantry, c
Tom Livingston (search for this): chapter 7
, against the guerillas, had a lively contest a few days ago with Livingston's band, and in the affair, had half a dozen of his men captured. y receives his orders from the commanding officer at Fort Scott. Livingston, we understand, is commissioned by and acting under regular ordernties, and with whom we had a number of skirmishes last May. But Livingston attacks our supply trains, and his numerous predatory actions abontry gives a wide field of operations for such an organization as Livingston's. And until we can establish more numerous stations along the whe Confederate government, or the fugitive Governor of Missouri. Livingston whom I have already referred to, may be cited as an instance. Th movements in every possible manner. Though as I have mentioned, Livingston is not accused of murdering his prisoners in cold blood, yet our own regiment, having been on a scout of several days in search of Livingston's band. If the remainder of General Blunt's division, which sepa
Joel Moody (search for this): chapter 7
unting down bushwhackers, and in making that section an unsafe and an uncomfortable retreat for them. Colonel Phillips has not only shown sound judgment in the general management of his division, but also in the selection of officers for his staff as confidential advisers, and also other officers of special fitness for special duties. Probably few officers could be found who would make a better Assistant Adjutant General than Captain William Gallaher, or a better Judge Advocate than Captain Joel Moody. Of Captain Gallaher I can speak from personal knowledge, as I have known him since I entered the service. Colonel William F. Cloud, Second Kansas cavalry, who is now in command of the District of Southwest Missouri, with head quarters at Springfield, was at Neosha yesterday, 20th instant, with a detachment of the 7th Missouri State Militia and one company of his own regiment, having been on a scout of several days in search of Livingston's band. If the remainder of General Blunt
Maxwell Phillips (search for this): chapter 7
The Author's return to his division at Scott's Mill's Colonel Phillips' popularity with his troops rebels returning and taking the ohe refugees. Since we left Elm Springs as a separate command, Colonel Phillips has steadily grown in popularity with his troops, and we now binter. Though great care and interest have been manifested by Colonel Phillips in looking after them, yet it has been impossible to make themhed their destination in good condition. Yesterday (15th), Colonel Phillips sent a squad of ten rebel prisoners that we recently captured,o be exceedingly industrious and wide awake to gain a point on Colonel Phillips. His movements on the military chessboard show that he is notthat section an unsafe and an uncomfortable retreat for them. Colonel Phillips has not only shown sound judgment in the general management ofgs, is occupying the country around Springfield, it would seem Colonel Phillips' division is now occupying the most advanced position of any o
Quantrell (search for this): chapter 7
along the Spring River, in Jasper County, against the guerillas, had a lively contest a few days ago with Livingston's band, and in the affair, had half a dozen of his men captured. The loss sustained by the enemy, if any, I have been unable to ascertain, as Captain Conkey receives his orders from the commanding officer at Fort Scott. Livingston, we understand, is commissioned by and acting under regular orders from the rebel authorities, and is not accused of killing his prisoners like Quantrell, whose operations are confined chiefly to Jackson and Cass counties, and with whom we had a number of skirmishes last May. But Livingston attacks our supply trains, and his numerous predatory actions about unprotected points have given him considerable prominence during the last year. Whenever our troops come upon him with equal, or perhaps; somewhat superior numbers, he never stands, but soon scatters his men in small squads, permitting them sometimes to return to their homes for a few
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