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Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
the Indian division encamped on the edge of the battle field of Pea Ridge an account of the battle from data collected on the field and fround them. One year ago to day, the 6th, the battle known as Pea Ridge commenced on this very ground. On the 6th the enemy, under Gener of General S. R. Curtis, twelve miles northeast of here, between Pea Ridge and Cross Hollows. I have heard it said that General Van Dorn ma about two miles west of the Springfield road at the west end of Pea Ridge. Our forces, however, were still divided into two separate armiee days last October, when we were encamped on the battle-field of Pea Ridge, in ascertaining the positions of different divisions of the two ods. I have now conducted the reader over the battle-field of Pea Ridge, commencing at this place, pointed out to him the position of ourll remind them probably of the anniversary of the bloody field of Pea Ridge as long as they live. The ides of March of each succeeding year
Van Buren, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
eville the great difficulty in getting forage a scouting party returns from Van Buren the Indian division encamped on the edge of the battle field of Pea Ridge several weeks. A scouting party from this division has just returned from Van Buren via Fayetteville, having been absent about a week. While they were in the vicinity of Van Buren, Captain Fred Crafts, the commanding officer of the detachment, sent a spy into Fort Smith, who returned and reported that the enemy had only aboour front for at least one hundred miles south of us. Since our expedition to Van Buren last December, the rebel authorities have not ventured to keep a regular stato-day from Colonels Carroll's Arkansas regiment, which is now stationed below Van Buren on the Arkansas river. He does not think that the enemy in that section contr reconnoitering parties are ever now and then returning from the vicinity of Van Buren, and in each instance report no enemy in force. Captain John Rogers, of the
Boonsborough (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
es rebel raid on Neosho and capture of negroes a deserter from the enemy gives position and strength of their forces the enemy's wounded from Prairie Grove at Cane Hill still great mortality among them skirmish with bushwhackers arrival of forage trains from white River horses eat each others manes and tails off the small-p enemy in force. Captain John Rogers, of the battalion Sixth Kansas cavalry, with a detachment of two hundred men, returned yesterday evening (13th) from beyond Cane Hill, in the Boston Mountains, and reports having met with no signs of the enemy. He saw, however, at Cane Hill a large number of the rebel wounded that were taken tCane Hill a large number of the rebel wounded that were taken to that place last December from the battle-field of Prairie Grove. We have heard that a large percentage of the rebel wounded-probably nearly as many as General Hindman left on the field --have died in the hospitals there during the past winter. It may be that the mortality is not unusually high for the number wounded. If they h
Cross Hollows (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
west or to send out troops to the west, so tight are our lines being drawn around them. One year ago to day, the 6th, the battle known as Pea Ridge commenced on this very ground. On the 6th the enemy, under General Van Dorn, attacked General Sigel's division at this place, and he retreated, contesting every inch of ground, until he formed a junction with the other divisions of our army under the command of General S. R. Curtis, twelve miles northeast of here, between Pea Ridge and Cross Hollows. I have heard it said that General Van Dorn made the remark, that had his forces attacked General Sigel twenty minutes sooner, he would have captured the entire division of five or six thousand men. Twenty minutes more would probably have enabled General Van Dorn to have thrown a strong force between Generals Curtis and Sigel, and to have fought them separately. A short distance east of this place, on the line of retreat, in looking over the late scene of operations, I noticed a number
Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
trains are sent almost two days march from camp, and then frequently return with most of the wagons empty or only partly filled with wheat straw. This, under ordinary circumstances, we use for bedding for our animals, but now we are obliged to use it largely as a substitute for hay and fodder. We cannot understand why we are not able to get all the corn and oats from Kansas that may be required for the command, for we hear that great quantities have been contracted for and are stored at Fort Scott. If our animals are permitted to run down in flesh and to become weak, we shall be obliged to content ourselves with less aggressiveness. It is possible, however, that before we shall have reached our usual radius of fifteen to twenty miles, some neighborhood will be found that can furnish us corn, oats, hay and straw for several weeks. A scouting party from this division has just returned from Van Buren via Fayetteville, having been absent about a week. While they were in the vicin
Neosho (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 8: Colonel Phillips invited to address a mass meeting of the Union citizens of northwestern Arkansas, at Fayetteville the great difficulty in getting forage a scouting party returns from Van Buren the Indian division encamped on the edge of the battle field of Pea Ridge an account of the battle from data collected on the field and from eye Witnesses rebel raid on Neosho and capture of negroes a deserter from the enemy gives position and strength of their forces the enemy's wounded from Prairie Grove at Cane Hill still great mortality among them skirmish with bushwhackers arrival of forage trains from white River horses eat each others manes and tails off the small-pox among the Indians very few of them vaccinated only a few cases among the white soldiers remarks on the disease the Government should stock with animals to furnish Vaccine virus for the army. On the morning of March 4th, Colonel Phillips, with an escort of one hundred men, set out
Washington County, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ll great mortality among them skirmish with bushwhackers arrival of forage trains from white River horses eat each others manes and tails off the small-pox among the Indians very few of them vaccinated only a few cases among the white soldiers remarks on the disease the Government should stock with animals to furnish Vaccine virus for the army. On the morning of March 4th, Colonel Phillips, with an escort of one hundred men, set out for Fayetteville. The Union citizens of Washington county have called a mass meeting to be held at that place, and as that county is in his district, have invited him to be present, and to address them on current issues, and concerning their future prospects. Of course I have no means of knowing what advice he will give them, but it is easy to imagine that he will advise them to enroll every able-bodied loyal man in defence of their homes, to be vigilant and take every precaution against surprise by the enemy, to see to it that the troops s
Fort Smith (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
scouting party from this division has just returned from Van Buren via Fayetteville, having been absent about a week. While they were in the vicinity of Van Buren, Captain Fred Crafts, the commanding officer of the detachment, sent a spy into Fort Smith, who returned and reported that the enemy had only about three hundred men stationed there. It is therefore evident that we have no organized enemy of much consequence directly in our front for at least one hundred miles south of us. Since ourfor the healing of gunshot wounds than the warm weather of summer. It has now been upwards of three months since the battle of Prairie Grove, and it is a little surprising that the rebel authorities should not have removed all their wounded to Fort Smith or to some point within their lines, by this time A detachment of about twenty-five men from this division had a fight yesterday, some fifteen miles from camp, with a party of bushwhackers, and killed six of them. Two of our soldiers were wou
Maysville (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rising that the rebel authorities should not have removed all their wounded to Fort Smith or to some point within their lines, by this time A detachment of about twenty-five men from this division had a fight yesterday, some fifteen miles from camp, with a party of bushwhackers, and killed six of them. Two of our soldiers were wounded. This was the liveliest skirmish our foraging parties have had for several weeks. Two companies of the Third Indian regiment came in this evening from Maysville, where they have been stationed for some time. That place is now abandoned, and the small fort that was constructed there during the winter, as a temporary defence, has been destroyed. As we exhausted that section of forage and commissary supplies before leaving it, it will now hardly afford any special attractions for guerrillas to return to until spring shall bring grass sufficient for grazing purposes. This evening (14th) a train of upwards of one hundred wagons came in, loaded pr
Neosho, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
st but a few moments ahead of the; enemy. A couple of soldiers posted on a road several miles out, by the time they had halted and ascertained whether the approaching force was friend or foe, would, if the latter, have few chances of escape, if it were at night. If Livingston's men are mounted upon as good horses as they are reported to be, they could move more rapidly than an Indian guard mounted on a pony. In a few weeks the Indian soldiers and all the refugee Indian families will leave Neosho and join us in the Nation, and then it is the intention to have stationed there several companies of the Missouri State Militia, who generally have good horses, and will probably be able at least to hold their own with the guerrillas of southwest Missouri. A deserter came into our lines to-day from Colonels Carroll's Arkansas regiment, which is now stationed below Van Buren on the Arkansas river. He does not think that the enemy in that section contemplates an immediate movement northwa
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