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d arrived at Sutherlands Station, within six miles of Five Forks, and about that distance from our fight that afternoon on the Quaker Road. On the morning of the 29th, Lee had also despatched General R. H. Anderson with Bushrod Johnson's Division- Gracie's, Ransom's, Wise's, and Wallace's Brigades --to reinforce his main entrenchments along the White Oak Road. It was these troops which we had encountered on the Quaker Road. Pickett's Division, consisting of the brigades of Stuart, Hunton, Corse, and Terry, about five thousand strong, was sent to the entrenchments along the Claiborne Road, and Roberts's Brigade of North Carolina cavalry, to picket the White Oak Road from the Claiborne, the right of their entrenchments, to Five Forks. On the thirtieth, the Fifth Corps, relieved by the Second, moved to the left along the Boydton Road, advancing its left towards the right of the enemy's entrenchments on the White Oak Road. Lee, also, apprehensive for his right, sent McGowan's Sout
handed it to the General with the assurance that I should be proud if he would accept it, as a token of what I could not then fully set forth in words. He did accept it and outdid me in the expression of sentiments. One of the noble captains (Rehfuss) of the g98th Pennsylvania instantly handed me one that lay on the line we had carried, --I should say, perhaps, he had carried,--and which was a fine sword with a Palmetto engraved scabbard. I took it until our muster out, when I returned it to Captain Rehfuss, with words of remembrance which he seemed to appreciate. This sword of mine has a peculiar history since that time. General Griffin at the close of the war was ordered to a command in Texas, and took this sword with him. Here the yellow fever breaking out he was advised by the War Department to take a leave of absence and return to his home for a season. He declined; saying that his duty was where his command was, and that he would stay by his men. He took the fever and
to have moved so late and moderately that Fitzhugh Lee had time to march from Sutherland's Station to Five Forks, and thence half-way to Dinwiddle Court House to meet him; and even then, attacking with a single division, although this outnumbered the enemy by a thousand men, General Devin's Division numbered, according to returns of March 30, 169 officers and 2830 men, present for duty. he permitted his demonstration on Five Forks to be turned into a reconnaissance half-way out, General Merritt's despatch of March 30th. Rebellion Records, Serial 97, p. 326. his advance being checked at the forks of the Ford and Boisseau Road, where it remained all night and until itself attacked the next morning. General Fitzhugh Lee's testimony. Warren Court Records, vol. i., p. 469. It is true that the roads and fields were heavy with rain; but this did not prevent our two infantry corps from moving forward and establishing themselves in front of the White Oak Road, in face of considera
t's Division, consisting of the brigades of Stuart, Hunton, Corse, and Terry, about five thousand strong, was with three brigades of Pickett's Division (leaving Hunton's in the entrenchments), to go with Pickett to reind ordered four brigades, those of Wise, Gracie, and Hunton, with McGowan's South Carolina Brigade, to move outttacking forces struck on his front and right. General Hunton Records, Warren Court, p. 623. says they weredirecting affairs in our front, Testimony of General Hunton and General McGowan, Warren Court Records, vol.oldiers born so, swing in upon their left, striking Hunton's Brigade in front, and for a few minutes there is Oak Road facing northeast, and take breath. General Hunton, since Senator from Virginia, said in his testiits defenders,--Generals Anderson and Johnson, with Hunton, Wise, Gracie, and Fulton's Brigades being of the nk of the momentarily demoralized Fifth Corps, while Hunton and Gracie and Wallace and Wise were on its front,
Joseph J. Bartlett (search for this): chapter 5
reaking through Griffin's right where he and Bartlett re-form them behind the Third Brigade. The pat exertion got a battery into position along Bartlett's front. The enemy were gathering force, altGriffin came up and Warren asked him to send Bartlett's Brigade at once to threaten the rear of the Sheridan. That took away our best brigade. Bartlett was an experienced and capable officer, and tould have been quite a different matter. But Bartlett had already been gone an hour when this ordeand mire. Of course, Warren could not recall Bartlett. But to comply as nearly as possible with the directed General Pearson, who with three of Bartlett's regiments was guarding the trains on the Bo But he had already of his own accord sent Bartlett's Brigade, of Griffin's Division, the nearestarren's orders, Griffin and Crawford to go by Bartlett's way. But Griffin had sent for Bartlett ould anticipate and forestall the movement of Bartlett's Brigade, and come across conversely from th[15 more...]
Dinwiddie (search for this): chapter 5
525. What then was this advance? Surely not to create a diversion in favor of Sheridan before Dinwiddie. At all events, there was an endeavor to get possession of the White Oak Road. And that couln with but a single division of our cavalry could disengage himself from his occupation before Dinwiddie, so far away to our rear, and now so far off from any strategic point, where he had first been your command by the road Bartlett is on, and strike the enemy in rear, who is between him and Dinwiddie. Should the enemy turn on you, your line of retreat will be by J. M. Brooks' and R. Boisseau'o o'clock in the morning, whence he pushed down the Plank Road and reported to Sheridan before Dinwiddie at the dawning of day. Whereupon he was informed that he had advanced two miles farther than GBartlett's demonstration. 4. No doubt it was right to save the honor of the cavalry before Dinwiddie, as of the Fifth Corps before the White Oak Road; and Sheridan's withdrawal to that place havi
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 5
s, Lee had on the 28th of March ordered General Fitzhugh Lee with his division of cavalry — about 13n the Quaker Road. On the morning of the 29th, Lee had also despatched General R. H. Anderson withe enemy's entrenchments on the White Oak Road. Lee, also, apprehensive for his right, sent McGowanenchments), to go with Pickett to reinforce Fitzhugh Lee at Five Forks. W. H. F. Lee's Division of cs reinforcements of infantry and cavalry to Fitzhugh Lee at Five Forks, where they arrived about sun in my front. Had I known of the fact that General Lee himself was personally directing affairs inor the Fifth Corps to leave the White Oak Road, Lee's company, and everything else, and rush back frk, to help Sheridan stay where Pickett and Fitzhugh Lee had put him. Indeed, the suggestive informaemy's communications; the other, the turning of Lee's right and breaking up his army by our infantr direct the assault immediately on the right of Lee's entrenched lines on the Fifth Corps front,--t[24 more...]
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 5
ft of his lines near Hanover Court House, to the extreme right in the vicinity of Five Forks, this being four or five miles beyond Lee's entrenched right, at which point it was thought Sheridan would attempt to break up the Southside Railroad. Longstreet had admonished him that the next move would be on his communications, urging him to put a sufficient force in the field to meet this. Our greater danger, he said, is from keeping too close within our trenches. Manassas to Appomattox, p. 588he came up gallantly on its flank and rendered it great assistance by turning the flank of General Wise and keeping the enemy from massing on our front. He reports the capture of the flag of the 47th Alabama, a regiment of Law's old brigade of Longstreet's Corps, which was nowhere near the front of the Fifth Corps on this day. In the investigations before the Court of Inquiry, General Warren felt under the necessity of excusing himself from the responsibility of the disastrous results of Ay
struck quite to the right of us all, attacking in his own front. But it got into the reports otherwise, and went up. Grant accepted it as given; and so it has got into history, and never can be gotten out. General Miles did not get ahead of the Fifth Corps that day, but he came up gallantly on its flank and rendered it great assistance by turning the flank of General Wise and keeping the enemy from massing on our front. He reports the capture of the flag of the 47th Alabama, a regiment of Law's old brigade of Longstreet's Corps, which was nowhere near the front of the Fifth Corps on this day. In the investigations before the Court of Inquiry, General Warren felt under the necessity of excusing himself from the responsibility of the disastrous results of Ayres' advance on the morning of the thirty-first. He is at pains to show that he did not intend an attack there, although he had suggested the probable success of such movement. Records, Warren Court, Part II., p. 1525. Wh
junction of the White Oak and Claiborne Roads: Ayres, with the Second Division, in advance, about sun. In accordance with this understanding, Ayres had made a careful examination of the situatioor the White Oak Road was put into execution. Ayres advanced soldierlike, as was his nature; resolft, supported by all I can get of Crawford and Ayres, and attack .... This will take place about 1.operations nugatory. I will now send General Ayres to General Sheridan, and take General Griffin , nearest, and most disengaged. 4. To send Ayres and Crawford by the way Bartlett had gone, anddded the actual final movement, which was that Ayres went down the Boydton Road, and Griffin and Celaxation from intense vigilance. Meantime Ayres had kept on, according to Warren's first order by the roadside. We are not sorry for that. Ayres soon comes up on the Brooks Road. Crawford arompany,for going beyond the actual recovery of Ayres' lost field, and pressing on for the White Oak[19 more...]
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