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ched General R. H. Anderson with Bushrod Johnson's Division- Gracie's, Ransom's, Wise's, and Wallace's Brigades --to reinforce his main entrenchments along the White every advantage or desperate expedient, he had ordered four brigades, those of Wise, Gracie, and Hunton, with McGowan's South Carolina Brigade, to move out from thefront, somewhat to the right of our division, and pressed so far out as to flank Wise's Brigade on the left of the troops that had attacked Ayres, and drove them back called away most of its defenders,--Generals Anderson and Johnson, with Hunton, Wise, Gracie, and Fulton's Brigades being of the number,--and the whole rebel army walantly on its flank and rendered it great assistance by turning the flank of General Wise and keeping the enemy from massing on our front. He reports the capture of the momentarily demoralized Fifth Corps, while Hunton and Gracie and Wallace and Wise were on its front, we should have had trouble. Or had they, after repulsing She
r. You can't get men through this swamp in any kind of order, says Warren. It may do to come back on, General; it will not do to stop for that now. My men will go straight through. So at a word the First Battalion of the 198th Pennsylvania, Major Glenn commanding, plunges into the muddy branch, waist deep and more, General Warren states in his testimony before the Court of Inquiry that this stream was sixty feet wide and four or five feet deep. Records, p. 717. with cartridge-boxes bornemmanded now by Captain Stanton, since Sickel and McEuen were gone, keeping the banks beyond clear of the enemy by their well-directed fire, until the First has formed in skirmishing order and pressed up the bank. I then pushed through to support Glenn and formed my brigade in line of battle on the opposite bank, followed by Gregory's in column of regiments. The enemy fell back without much resistance until finding supports on broken strong ground they made stand after stand. Griffin followe
sufficient force in the field to meet this. Our greater danger, he said, is from keeping too close within our trenches. Manassas to Appomattox, p. 588. Such despatch had Fitzhugh Lee made that on the evening of the twenty-ninth he had arrived at Sutherlands Station, within six miles of Five Forks, and about that distance from our fight that afternoon on the Quaker Road. On the morning of the 29th, Lee had also despatched General R. H. Anderson with Bushrod Johnson's Division- Gracie's, Ransom's, Wise's, and Wallace's Brigades --to reinforce his main entrenchments along the White Oak Road. It was these troops which we had encountered on the Quaker Road. Pickett's Division, consisting of the brigades of Stuart, Hunton, Corse, and Terry, about five thousand strong, was sent to the entrenchments along the Claiborne Road, and Roberts's Brigade of North Carolina cavalry, to picket the White Oak Road from the Claiborne, the right of their entrenchments, to Five Forks. On the thirt
there was nothing to oppose him there but the right wing of Roberts' slender brigade, picketing the White Oak Road. But when he received a positive order to secure that point on the morning of the 30th, he seems to have moved so late and moderately that Fitzhugh Lee had time to march from Sutherland's Station to Five Forks, and thence half-way to Dinwiddle Court House to meet him; and even then, attacking with a single division, although this outnumbered the enemy by a thousand men, General Devin's Division numbered, according to returns of March 30, 169 officers and 2830 men, present for duty. he permitted his demonstration on Five Forks to be turned into a reconnaissance half-way out, General Merritt's despatch of March 30th. Rebellion Records, Serial 97, p. 326. his advance being checked at the forks of the Ford and Boisseau Road, where it remained all night and until itself attacked the next morning. General Fitzhugh Lee's testimony. Warren Court Records, vol. i., p.
gs and of minds when the advance ordered for the White Oak Road was put into execution. Ayres advanced soldierlike, as was his nature; resolute, firm-hearted, fearing nothing, in truth not fearing quite enough. Although he believed his advance would bring on a battle, he moved without skirmishers, but in a wedgelike formation guarding both flanks. His First Brigade, commanded by the gallant Winthrop, had the lead in line of battle, his right and rear supported by the Third Brigade, that of Gwyn, who was accounted a good fighter; and Denison's Maryland Brigade formed in column on Winthrop's left and rear, ready to face outward by the left flank in case of need; while a brigade of Crawford's was held in reserve in rear of the center. This would seem to be a prudent and strong formation of Ayres' command. The enemy's onset was swift and the encounter sudden. The blow fell without warning, enveloping Ayres' complete front. It appears that McGowan's Brigade struck squarely on Winthro
r two divisions were coming back in confusion, Meade had asked Grant to have Sheridan strike the at was attacked. For we have Grant's message to Meade, sent at 12.40, which is evidently a reply: Itt attacking with his whole corps, and asks General Meade, What is to prevent him from pitching in welicit approval, or even notice, from Grant or Meade, or Warren. As things turned, Warren was put ecall: at eight o'clock on the evening before, Meade had sent Grant a despatch from Warren, suggestrs being sent out accordingly, and reported by Meade, General Grant replies late that evening: Youy had. Grant had repeated imperative orders to Meade to spare no exertions in getting rations forward to the Fifth Corps; whereupon Meade, who had himself eaten salt with this old Corps, gave ordersfusion came in the following despatch from General Meade to Warren at one o'clock at night: Would nstered to by that expert in nervous diseases,--Meade. The orders which came to General Warren t[29 more...]
rents, then rolling back, leaving a fringe of wrecks,--and all is over. We pour over the works, swing to the right and drive the enemy into their entrenchments along the Claiborne Road, and then establish ourselves across the White Oak Road facing northeast, and take breath. General Hunton, since Senator from Virginia, said in his testimony before the Warren Court, speaking of this charge, I thought it was one of the most gallant things I had ever seen. --Records, Part I, p. 625. Major Woodward in his history of the 198th Pennsylvania, giving a graphic outline of the last dash, closes with an incident I had not recorded. Only for a moment, he says, did the sudden and terrible blast of death cause the right of the line to waver. On they dashed, every color flying, officers leading, right in among the enemy, leaping the breastworks,--a confused struggle of firing, cutting, thrusting, a tremendous surge of force, both moral and physical, on the enemy's breaking lines,--and the w
Augustus Ziever (search for this): chapter 5
8th Pennsylvania, giving a graphic outline of the last dash, closes with an incident I had not recorded. Only for a moment, he says, did the sudden and terrible blast of death cause the right of the line to waver. On they dashed, every color flying, officers leading, right in among the enemy, leaping the breastworks,--a confused struggle of firing, cutting, thrusting, a tremendous surge of force, both moral and physical, on the enemy's breaking lines,--and the works were carried. Private Augustus Ziever captured the flag of the 46th Virginia in mounting one of the parapets, and handed it to General Chamberlain in the midst of the m616e, who immediately gave it back to him, telling him to keep it and take the credit that belonged to him. Almost that entire regiment was captured at the same time. It scarcely need be added that the man who captured that battle flag was sent with it in person to General Warren, and that he received a medal of honor from the Government. In due tim
d Sheridan: Our line is now unbroken from Appomattox to Dinwiddie. I now feel like ending the matter, if possible, before going back. I do not want you, therefore, to cut loose and go after the enemy's roads at present. In the morning push around the enemy, if you can, and get on to his right rear. The movements of the enemy's cavalry may, of course, modify your action. We will act together as one army here, until it is seen what can be done with the enemy. Grant also telegraphed President Lincoln: General Griffin was attacked near where the Quaker Road intersects the Boydton, but repulsed it easily, capturing about 100 prisoners. But on the morning of the 30th, he telegraphed the President again: I understand the number of dead left by the enemy yesterday for us to bury was much greater than our own dead. Our captures also were larger than reported. This morning all our troops have been pushed forward. For the morning of the 30th in spite of the sodden earth and miry roads,
ction. The despatch was the following: As Warren and Humphreys advance, thus shortening their lknew still better, and we also, unmistakably. Warren was evidently impressed with Grant's desire to Grant or Meade, or Warren. As things turned, Warren was put under a strong motive to ignore this ewly made Middle military Division. So while Warren was begging to be permitted to take his corps omfiture, Grant seems first to have thought of Warren's predicament. In a despatch to Meade early ithe Boydton Road, ready to start for Sheridan, Warren, anxious to fulfill the spirit and object of tn the following despatch from General Meade to Warren at one o'clock at night: Would not time be gaio this muddle now: we can imagine the state of Warren's mind. But this was not all. Within the spac. Meantime Ayres had kept on, according to Warren's first orders to him, getting a small installment of rations on the way, and arriving at Warren's Bridge of Sighs on the Gravelly Run just as it [61 more...]
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