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New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
pistols in his belt. He has a sweetheart — for Lieutenant- Colonel — enters into his hero's most private affairs-who makes love to Union officers, and leads them into the toils of the remorseless Mosby. That individual exclaims in moments of excitement, Confusion! after the universal fashion of Confederate States officers in the late war; and in order to make the history of his life a full and comprehensive one, the minutest particulars are given of his well known scheme to burn the city of New York--a brilliant idea, exclusively belonging to this celebrated bandit, who is vividly represented in a cheap woodcut as pouring liquid phosphorus on his bed at the Astor House. This biographical work is profusely illustrated, beautifully bound in a yellow paper cover, and the price is only ten cents. It may be said that this is, after all, a species of literature, socalled, such as no person of character or intelligence ever reads. Such is doubtless the truth in regard to Lieutenant-
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
ut one or two other incidents in his career; and one shall be his surprise of Brigadier-General Stoughton at Fairfax Court-House in the winter of 1862. This affair excited unbounded indignation on the part of many excellent people, though President Lincoln made a jest of it. Let us not see if it was not a legitimate partisan operation. It was in November, I believe, that Mosby received the information leading to his movement. The Federal forces at that time occupied the region between Fredericksburg and Alexandria; and as General Stuart's activity and energy were just causes of solicitude, a strong body of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, was posted in the neighbourhood of Fairfax Court-House and Centreville. Colonel Wyndham was in command of the cavalry, and Acting Brigadier-General Stoughton, a young officer from West Point, commanded the whole district, with his headquarters in the small village of Fairfax. Mosby formed the design of capturing General Stoughton, Colonel Wyndh
Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
wounds he always reappeared paler and thinner, but more active and untiring than ever. They only seemed to exasperate him, and make him more dangerous to trains, scouting parties, and detached camps than before. The great secret of his success was undoubtedly his unbounded energy and enterprise. General Stuart came finally to repose unlimited confidence in his resources, and relied implicitly upon him. The writer recalls an instance of this in June, 1863. General Stuart was then near Middleburg, watching the United States army-then about to move toward Pennsylvania --but could get no accurate information from his scouts. Silent, puzzled, and doubtful, the General walked up and down, knitting his brows and reflecting, when the lithe figure of Mosby appeared, and Stuart uttered an exclamation of relief and satisfaction. They were speedily in private consultation, and Mosby only came out again to mount his quick gray mare and set out, in a heavy storm, for the Federal camps. On
Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
urhood to ascertain the force there. They brought word that a strong body of infantry and artillery was at Centreville; Colonel Wyndham's brigade of cavalry at Germantown, a mile from Fairfax; and toward the railroad station another brigade of infantry. Fairfax thus appeared to be inclosed within a cordon of all arms, rendering he party had to steal off with their captures, if any were made, or cut their way through, and on that black night no uniform was discernible. Mosby approached Germantown by the Little River turnpike; but fearing Wyndham's cavalry, obliqued to the right, and took to the woods skirting the Warrenton road. Centreville was thus, with its garrison, on his right and rear, Germantown on his left, and Fairfax, winged with infantry camps, in his front. It was now raining heavily, and the night was like pitch. The party advanced by bridle-paths through the woods, thus avoiding the pickets of the main avenues of approach, and the incessant patter of the rain dr
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
the cavalry, and Acting Brigadier-General Stoughton, a young officer from West Point, commanded the whole district, with his headquarters in the small village of Fairfax. Mosby formed the design of capturing General Stoughton, Colonel Wyndham, Colonel Johnson, and other officers; and sent scouts to the neighbourhood to ascertain e force there. They brought word that a strong body of infantry and artillery was at Centreville; Colonel Wyndham's brigade of cavalry at Germantown, a mile from Fairfax; and toward the railroad station another brigade of infantry. Fairfax thus appeared to be inclosed within a cordon of all arms, rendering it wholly impossible evh the woods, thus avoiding the pickets of the main avenues of approach, and the incessant patter of the rain drowned the hoof-strokes of the horses. A mile from Fairfax the gleam of tents greeted them in front, and finding the approaches barred in that direction they silently obliqued to the right again, crossed the Warrenton roa
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
cavalry, the untiring, never-resting adversary of the Federal forces invading Virginia. The burly-ruffian view of him will not bear inspection; and if there are any who cannot erase from their minds this fanciful figure of a cold, coarse, heartless adventurer, I would beg them to dwell for a moment upon a picture which the Richmond correspondent of a Northern journal drew the other day. On a summer morning a solitary man was seen beside the grave of Stuart, in Hollywood Cemetery, near Richmond. The dew was on the grass, the birds sang overhead, the green hillock at the man's feet was all that remained of the daring leader of the Southern cavalry, who, after all his toils, his battles, and the shocks of desperate encounters, had come here to rest in peace. Beside this unmarked grave the solitary mourner remained long, pondering and remembering. Finally he plucked a wild flower, dropped it upon the grave, and with tears in his eyes, left the place. This lonely mourner at th
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
It was in November, I believe, that Mosby received the information leading to his movement. The Federal forces at that time occupied the region between Fredericksburg and Alexandria; and as General Stuart's activity and energy were just causes of solicitude, a strong body of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, was posted in the neighbourhood of Fairfax Court-House and Centreville. Colonel Wyndham was in command of the cavalry, and Acting Brigadier-General Stoughton, a young officer from West Point, commanded the whole district, with his headquarters in the small village of Fairfax. Mosby formed the design of capturing General Stoughton, Colonel Wyndham, Colonel Johnson, and other officers; and sent scouts to the neighbourhood to ascertain the force there. They brought word that a strong body of infantry and artillery was at Centreville; Colonel Wyndham's brigade of cavalry at Germantown, a mile from Fairfax; and toward the railroad station another brigade of infantry. Fairfax thu
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
diers. Their horses were in comfortable stables, or ranged freely over excellent pastures; the men lived with the families, slept in beds, and had nothing to do with rations of hard bread and bacon. Milk, butter, and all the household luxuries of peace were at their command; and not until their chief summoned them did they buckle on their arms and get to horse. While they were thus living on the fat of the land, Mosby was perhaps scouting off on his private account, somewhere down toward Manassas, Alexandria, or Leesburg. If his excursions revealed an opening for successful operations, he sent off a well mounted courier, who travelled rapidly to the first nest of rangers; thence a fresh courier carried the summons elsewhere; and in a few hours twenty, thirty, or fifty men, excellently mounted, made their appearance at the prescribed rendezvous. The man who disregarded or evaded the second summons to a raid was summarily dealt with; he received a note for delivery to General Stuar
Cub Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
een captured, and a considerable number of horses-Colonels Wyndham and Johnson eluded the search for them. Deciding not to burn the public stores which were in the houses, Mosby then mounted all his prisoners — some thirty-five, I believe, in number, including about half-a-dozen officers-cautiously retraced his steps, passing over the very same ground, and stealing along about down under the muzzles of the guns in the works at Centreville, so close that the sentinel hailed the party, swam Cub Run, struck southward, and at sunrise was safe beyond pursuit. Ii. The skill and boldness exhibited in the conception and execution of this raid conferred upon Mosby just fame as a partisan officer, and the regular organization of his command commenced. He was made captain, then major, then lieutenantcolonel, and colonel, as his force and his operations increased. From the solitary scout, or humble partisan, operating with a small squad, he had now grown to be an officer of rank and
Leesburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
in comfortable stables, or ranged freely over excellent pastures; the men lived with the families, slept in beds, and had nothing to do with rations of hard bread and bacon. Milk, butter, and all the household luxuries of peace were at their command; and not until their chief summoned them did they buckle on their arms and get to horse. While they were thus living on the fat of the land, Mosby was perhaps scouting off on his private account, somewhere down toward Manassas, Alexandria, or Leesburg. If his excursions revealed an opening for successful operations, he sent off a well mounted courier, who travelled rapidly to the first nest of rangers; thence a fresh courier carried the summons elsewhere; and in a few hours twenty, thirty, or fifty men, excellently mounted, made their appearance at the prescribed rendezvous. The man who disregarded or evaded the second summons to a raid was summarily dealt with; he received a note for delivery to General Stuart, and on reaching the ca
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