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n to repulse any assault in that direction, and the expected assault had been made. I think it was General Buford who attacked him; but the attack was unsuccessful, and as the enemy fell back Fitz Lee pressed forward on the track of the retreating column toward Brandy. We now heard the thunder of his guns upon the right as he pushed on toward the Rappahannock, and everything seemed to be concentrating in the neighbourhood of Fleetwood Hill, the scene of the sanguinary conflict of the 9th of June preceding. There the great struggle, in fact, took place-Stuart pressing the main column on their line of retreat from above, General Fitz Lee pushing as vigorously after the strong force which had fallen back from the Rappahannock. As it is not the design of the writer to attempt any battle pictures in this discursive sketch, he omits a detailed account of the hard fight which followed. It was among the heaviest of the war, and for a time nothing was seen but dust, smoke, and confused mas
going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons best known to himself, General Lee determined upon a movement through Madison ask the reader to follow Stuart and his horsemen. I think it was the morning of the ioth of October when, moving on the right of the long column of Ewell and Hill then streaming toward Madison Coce its steps to the Rappahannock. The cavalry had not, however, finished their work. The fine October weather was admirable for active movement, and Stuart pushed straight on to Manassas, harassing the soldiers going on their way rejoicing. Never have I seen more splendid weather than those October days, or more beautiful tints in the foliage. Pity that the natural red of the birch and dogwoof the events. This page aims at no generalization at all, but simply to show how Stuart and Fitz Lee, with their brave comrades, did the work assigned to them in those bright October days of 1863.
eetwood Hill-pressed them back to the Rappahannock, which they hastened to cross. General Meade has thus retreated from Culpeper, but it was the cleanest retreat on record, as far as the present writer's observation extended. He imitated it in December at Mine Run. General Lee had meanwhile advanced with his infantry toward Warrenton Springs, still aiming to cut General Meade off from Manassas. On the next day commenced the trial of skill between the two commanders. General Meade's cavalut it. General Meade was behind Bull Run fortifying. Thus terminated General Lee's vigorous attempt to bring on a pitched battle with Meade. That was his design, as it was General Meade's design in coming over to Mine Run in the succeeding December. Both schemes failed. From the high ground beyond Bristoe, Lee, surrounded by his generals, reconnoitered the retiring rear-guard of the enemy, and issued his orders for the army to retrace its steps to the Rappahannock. The cavalry had not,
August, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 2.22
Fauquier, a descendant of the Chief Justice, was lying on a table, covered with a sheet-dead, with a huge, bloody hole in the centre of his pale forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The army pushed on to Warrenton, the cavalry still in advance, and on the evening of the next day Stuart rapidly advanced with his column to reconnoitre toward Catlett's Station, the scene of his great raid in August, 1862, when he captured General Pope's coat and official papers. The incident which followed was one of the most curious of the war. Iii. Stuart had just passed Auburn, when General Gordon, commanding the rear of his column, sent him word that a heavy force of the enemy's infantry had closed in behind him, completely cutting him off from General Lee. As at the same moment an army corps of Federal infantry was discovered moving across his front, General Stuart awoke to the unpleasant con
ern Virginia, led by Ewell and Hill, with General Lee commanding in person, which sustained these losses, and failed in the object which the great soldier declared he had in viewto cut off and fight a pitched battle with General Meade. The movements of this latter commander entitled him to high praise, and he exhibited throughout the brief campaign a vigour and acumen which only belong to the thorough soldier. Such is an outline of some incidents in this rapid campaign; this hasty movement backward and forward on the great chessboard of war. The discursive sketch here laid before the reader may convey some idea of the occurrences as they actually took place. From the official reports the grave Muse of History will sum up the results, generalizing upon the importance or non-importance of the events. This page aims at no generalization at all, but simply to show how Stuart and Fitz Lee, with their brave comrades, did the work assigned to them in those bright October days of 1863.
October, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 2.22
From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. I. General Meade's retreat from Culpeper, in October, 1863, was one of the liveliest episodes of the late war. This officer was not unpopular in the Southern army. Few depredations were laid to his charge, and he was generally regarded as a fair and honorable opponent. TheOctober, 1863, was one of the liveliest episodes of the late war. This officer was not unpopular in the Southern army. Few depredations were laid to his charge, and he was generally regarded as a fair and honorable opponent. There was evidently no rhodomontade about him, and few trumpets were blown in his honour; but General Lee is said to have declared that he had given him as much trouble as any Federal general of the war. Of his status as a soldier, let history speak. The present sketch will show, I think, that no general ever better understood the diincidents as convey a clear idea of the actual occurrence, then to indulge in historical generalization. Often the least trifling of things are trifles. In October, 1863, General Meade's army was around Culpeper Court-House, with the advance at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank
ble-quicked toward the rear. They reached the fields on Stone House Mountain as quickly as Stuart, moving parallel to his column, and suddenly their line appeared. I have rarely seen General Stuart more excited. It was a rich prize, that regiment, and it appeared in his grasp! But, unfortunately, his column was not up. He was leading a mere advance guard, and that was scattered. Every available staff-officer and courier was hurried back for the cavalry, and the Jefferson company, Lieutenant Baylor, got up first, and charged straight at the flank of the infantry. They were suddenly halted, formed line of battle, and the bright muskets fell to a level like a single weapon. The cavalry company received the fire at thirty yards, but pressed on, and would doubtless have ridden over the infantry, now scattering in great disorder, but for an impassable ditch. Before they could make a detour to avoid it, the Federal infantry had scattered, every man for himself, in the woods, droppin
ds. The army had fallen back, tearing up the road, and General Stuart now prepared to follow, the campaign having come to an end. He was not, however, to be permitted to fall back without molestation, and his command was to be present at the Buckland races. This comic episode will be briefly described, and the event related just as it occurred, without embellishment or exaggeration. General Kilpatrick, commanding the Federal cavalry, had been very much outraged, it would appear, at the hasn cavalry, as it was almost bloodless and resembled a species of trap into which their opponents fell. Nothing amuses troops more than this latter circumstance, and the affair continues to be known among the disbanded troopers of Stuart, as the Buckland races. This engagement ended the campaign as far as the cavalry were concerned, and it was the movements of this arm that I proposed to outline. These were uniformly successful, while those of the infantry, from what appeared to be some fata
as captured. General Meade had swept clean. There were even very few empty boxes. On Cumberland George's hill, the Federal artillery fought hard for a time, inflicting some loss; but Gordon was sent round by the Rixeyville Road to the left; Stuart advanced in front; and the enemy fell back toward Brandy. The reader will remember that General Fitz Lee had been left on the Lower Rapidan to repulse any assault in that direction, and the expected assault had been made. I think it was General Buford who attacked him; but the attack was unsuccessful, and as the enemy fell back Fitz Lee pressed forward on the track of the retreating column toward Brandy. We now heard the thunder of his guns upon the right as he pushed on toward the Rappahannock, and everything seemed to be concentrating in the neighbourhood of Fleetwood Hill, the scene of the sanguinary conflict of the 9th of June preceding. There the great struggle, in fact, took place-Stuart pressing the main column on their line
head, and, in the face of a heavy and determined fire from a double line of Federal sharpshooters, they charged across. The Federal force gave way before them, and crossing his whole column Stuart pushed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet through his breast. At Mr. M—‘s, near the river, young Marshall, of Fauquier, a descendant of the Chief Justice, was lying on a table, covered with a sheet-dead, with a huge, bloody hole in the centre of his pale forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The
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