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Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
ove toward Madison Court-House with the rest of Stuart's cavalry on their right flank, to mask the movement; and, thence pushing on to the Rappahannock, make for Warrenton, somewhere near which point it was probable that they would strike General Meade's column on its retreat. Then a decisive trial of strength in a pitched battle.l sharpshooters, they charged across. The Federal force gave way before them, and crossing his whole column Stuart pushed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warre forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The army pushed on to Warrenton, the cavalry still in advance, and on the evening of the next day Stuart rapidly advanced with his column to reconnoitre toward Catlett's Station, the scene of h
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
or men, and let us say no more about it. General Meade was behind Bull Run fortifying. Thus terminated General Lee's vigorous attempt to aight on to Manassas, harassing the Federal forces as they crossed Bull Run. At Blackburn's Ford, General Fitz Lee had a brisk engagement, whring on the right, but taking position after position, each nearer Bull Run. General Stuart was within about four hundred yards of the Federaloff everything. We did not capture a wagon wheel. All was beyond Bull Run. The present writer here records his own capture, viz. one oilclohe country. On the next morning, Stuart left Fitz Lee in front of Bull Run, to oppose any advance of the Federal cavalry there, and, taking Hd for his Oliver. With about 3,000 cavalry he accordingly crossed Bull Run, following upon Stuart's track as the latter fell back; and soon he House Mountain, Culpeper Court-House, Brandy, Warrenton Springs, Bull Run, and Bucklands, the infantry failed to arrest the enemy at Auburn
Mitchell's Station (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
s as convey a clear idea of the actual occurrence, then to indulge in historical generalization. Often the least trifling of things are trifles. In October, 1863, General Meade's army was around Culpeper Court-House, with the advance at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, uld have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, the whistle of the Yankee cars, as we used to call them, was heard a few miles off, at Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons best known to himself, General Lee determined upon a movement through Madison, along
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
e Ridge, to flank General Meade's right, cut him off from Manassas, and bring on a general engagement between the two armieshoroughfare Mountain (not to be confounded with that near Manassas), we ran into a regiment of infantry which had hastily fo. Later in the fall, the general was running Lively near Manassas, when she flew the track, and two men were sent after herenton Springs, still aiming to cut General Meade off from Manassas. On the next day commenced the trial of skill between th his front and rear, were converging toward Bristoe, near Manassas. The only hope of safety lay in complete concealment of d on and crossed Broad Run, making with his main body for Manassas. When the Southern advance force reached Bristoe they foble for active movement, and Stuart pushed straight on to Manassas, harassing the Federal forces as they crossed Bull Run. s beyond Bucklandsthen Fitz Lee, who had fallen back from Manassas on the line of the Orange Railroad, would have an opport
Sperryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
choly pleasure to recall the gallant face of Gordon, now that he is dead; to remember his charming smile, his gay humour; the elegant little speech which he made as he gallantly presented a nosegay to the fair Miss H , bowing low as he did so amid friendly laughter. When he fell he left behind him no braver soldier or kindlier gentleman. Ii. At dawn Stuart was again in the saddle, pressing forward upon the retiring enemy. Ewell and Hill had moved unseen to their position on the Sperryville road, thanks to the stand of Stuart at James City; and now, for the first time, the enemy seemed to understand the nature of the blow about to be struck. General Meade had put his army in motion toward the Rappahannock; and, as the advance force in our front retired, Stuart pressed them closely. It is hard to say whether this great soldier was better in falling back or in advancing. When he retired he was the soul of stubborn obstinacy. When he advanced he was all fire, dash, and imp
Culpeper, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. I. General Meade's retreat from Culpeper, in October, 1863, was one of the liveliest episodes of the late war. This officer was not unpopular in the Southern army. Few depredations were laid eetwood Hill-pressed them back to the Rappahannock, which they hastened to cross. General Meade has thus retreated from Culpeper, but it was the cleanest retreat on record, as far as the present writer's observation extended. He imitated it in Dececavalry, had been very much outraged, it would appear, at the hasty manner in which Stuart had compelled him to evacuate Culpeper; and he now felt an ardent desire, before the campaign ended, to give the great cavalier a Roland for his Oliver. With at a house there that he would not press Stuart so hard, but he (Stuart) had boasted of driving him (Kilpatrick) out of Culpeper, and he was going to give him no rest. It is said that General Kilpatrick had scarcely uttered this threat when the roa
Mine Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
-pressed them back to the Rappahannock, which they hastened to cross. General Meade has thus retreated from Culpeper, but it was the cleanest retreat on record, as far as the present writer's observation extended. He imitated it in December at Mine Run. General Lee had meanwhile advanced with his infantry toward Warrenton Springs, still aiming to cut General Meade off from Manassas. On the next day commenced the trial of skill between the two commanders. General Meade's cavalry had been and let us say no more about it. General Meade was behind Bull Run fortifying. Thus terminated General Lee's vigorous attempt to bring on a pitched battle with Meade. That was his design, as it was General Meade's design in coming over to Mine Run in the succeeding December. Both schemes failed. From the high ground beyond Bristoe, Lee, surrounded by his generals, reconnoitered the retiring rear-guard of the enemy, and issued his orders for the army to retrace its steps to the Rappahann
Auburn, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
to reconnoitre toward Catlett's Station, the scene of his great raid in August, 1862, when he captured General Pope's coat and official papers. The incident which followed was one of the most curious of the war. Iii. Stuart had just passed Auburn, when General Gordon, commanding the rear of his column, sent him word that a heavy force of the enemy's infantry had closed in behind him, completely cutting him off from General Lee. As at the same moment an army corps of Federal infantry was to be some fatality, were regularly unsuccessful. While the cavalry drove their opponents before them at Stone House Mountain, Culpeper Court-House, Brandy, Warrenton Springs, Bull Run, and Bucklands, the infantry failed to arrest the enemy at Auburn; were repulsed at Bristoe with the loss of several guns; and now, on the Rappahannock, was to occur that ugly affair at the railroad bridge, in which two brigades of General Lee's army were surprised, overpowered, and captured almost to a man. Su
Gainsville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
uart left Fitz Lee in front of Bull Run, to oppose any advance of the Federal cavalry there, and, taking Hampton's division, set out through a torrent of rain to make a flank movement against General Meade's right beyond the Little River Turnpike. He had intended to cross at Sudley Ford, but coming upon the Federal cavalry near Groveton, a fight ensued, and the column could not cross there without having the movement unmasked. Stuart accordingly turned to the left; made a detour through Gainsville; and advancing, amid a violent storm, bivouacked that night beyond the Little Catharpin. The General on this day kept his entire staff and surroundings in great good-humour, by his songs and laughter, which only seemed to grow more jovial as the storm became more violent. I hope the reader will not regard this statement as unworthy of the dignity of history. Fortunately I am not writing history; only a poor little sketch of a passage in the life of a very great man; and it has seemed to
Bucklands (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
g steadily back by the same route which he had pursued in advancing, and on the next day he had reached the vicinity of Bucklands. The army had fallen back, tearing up the road, and General Stuart now prepared to follow, the campaign having come crossed Bull Run, following upon Stuart's track as the latter fell back; and soon he had reached the little village of Bucklands, not far from New Baltimore. Stuart had disappeared; but these disappearances of Stuart, like those of Jackson, wer would probably be satisfactory. This plan was carried out exactly as Stuart had arranged. General Kilpatrick reached Bucklands, and is said to have stated while dining at a house there that he would not press Stuart so hard, but he (Stuart) had bove their opponents before them at Stone House Mountain, Culpeper Court-House, Brandy, Warrenton Springs, Bull Run, and Bucklands, the infantry failed to arrest the enemy at Auburn; were repulsed at Bristoe with the loss of several guns; and now, o
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