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it had been contaminated, growled to the lady of the house: You taught him this, madam! Ix. In June, 1863, General Lee was going to set out for Gettysburg. To mask the movement of his infantry from the Lower Rappahannock, a cavalry review was ordered, on the plains of Culpeper. That gay and gallant commander, General Fitz Lee, thereupon, sent word to General Hood to come and see the review, and bring any of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direction of the Rapidan. You invited me and my people, said Hood, shaking hands with General Fitz, and you see I have brought them! Laughter followed, and General Fitz Lee said: Well, don't let them halloo, Here's your mule! at the review. If they do we will charge you! interrupted General Wade Hampton, laughing. For all that the graybacks of Hood, who duly attende
y you-but perhaps you will laugh. They are trifles, it is true; but then life is half made up of trifles — is it not? General Fitz Lee, one day in the fall of 1863, sent a courier up from the Lower Rappahannock, to ask General Stuart why General Pleasanton of the U. S. Army had been sent to Georgia? --a dispatch by signal fro signal-man's flag; then he suddenly drawled out in a tone of affectionate interest: I sa-a-y, str-a-nger! Are the fli-ies a pestering of you? Iv. In 1863 the enemy caught an old countryman near Madison Court-house, and informed him that he must do one of two things-either take the oath of allegiance to the United Stome way, so as you could ride me home! That ought to find a place in the biography of the brave officer who uttered it. Vii. While I was in the Valley in 1863, I heard an incident which was enough to tickle the ribs of Death, and for its truth I can vouch. A body of the enemy's cavalry had advanced to the vicinity of Mi
June, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 2.26
pon the back of his splendid uniform. Turning quickly in extreme wrath at this disrespect, he saw the grinning face of young ebony behind him; and from the lips of the youth issued the loud and friendly address: Hallo, Yank! Do you belong to Mr. Lincoln? You are fighting for me-ain't you? The officer recoiled in disgust, looked daggers, and brushing his uniform, as though it had been contaminated, growled to the lady of the house: You taught him this, madam! Ix. In June, 1863, General Lee was going to set out for Gettysburg. To mask the movement of his infantry from the Lower Rappahannock, a cavalry review was ordered, on the plains of Culpeper. That gay and gallant commander, General Fitz Lee, thereupon, sent word to General Hood to come and see the review, and bring any of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direc
November, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 2.26
why General Pleasanton of the U. S. Army had been sent to Georgia? --a dispatch by signal from corps headquarters having communicated that intelligence. Grand tableau when the affair was explained! General Stuart had signalled: Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland George's --names of persons residing near Culpeper Court-house. The signal flags had said: Meade's headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland Georgia! Ii. In November, 1863, Lieutenant — was in an old deserted mansion near Culpeper Court-house, with some prisoners confined in the upper rooms; the enemy not being far distant. While waiting, a blaze shot up from a fire which some soldiers had kindled near, and threw the shadow of the Lieutenant on the wall. Thinking the shadow was a human being he called out: Halt! there! No reply from the intruder. Answer, or I fire! The same silence-when the Lieutenant drew a pistol from his belt. The s
rmed the same manoeuvre. The Lieutenant thereupon was about to draw trigger, when one of his men called out: Why law! Lieutenant, it ain't nothin‘ but your own shadow! Immense enjoyment in camp, of this historic occurrence. Colonel — , our gay visitor, drew a sketch of the scene, appending to it the words: Now by the Apostle Paul: shadows to-night Have struck more terror to the soul of-- Than could the substance of ten thousand soldiers Armed all in proof and led by shallow Buford! Iii. Captain F-- was the best of good fellows, and the most amiable of signal officers. He was visiting his signal posts near Culpeper one day, when an infantry-man, clad in a butternut costume lounged up, and looked on with the deepest interest while the man on duty was flopping away right and left with his flag. Butternut continued to gaze with ardour upon the movements of the signal-man's flag; then he suddenly drawled out in a tone of affectionate interest: I sa-a-y, st
ry from the Lower Rappahannock, a cavalry review was ordered, on the plains of Culpeper. That gay and gallant commander, General Fitz Lee, thereupon, sent word to General Hood to come and see the review, and bring any of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direction of the Rapidan. You invited me and my people, said Hood, shaking hands with General Fitz, and you see I have brought them! Laughter followed, and General Fitz Lee said: Well, don't let them halloo, Here's your mule! at the review. If they do we will charge you! interrupted General Wade Hampton, laughing. For all that the graybacks of Hood, who duly attended the review, did not suppress their opinions of the cavalry. As the horsemen charged by the tall flag under which General R. E. Lee sat his horse looking at them, a weather-beaten Texan of Hood's Old B
Cumberland George (search for this): chapter 2.26
trifles, it is true; but then life is half made up of trifles — is it not? General Fitz Lee, one day in the fall of 1863, sent a courier up from the Lower Rappahannock, to ask General Stuart why General Pleasanton of the U. S. Army had been sent to Georgia? --a dispatch by signal from corps headquarters having communicated that intelligence. Grand tableau when the affair was explained! General Stuart had signalled: Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland George's --names of persons residing near Culpeper Court-house. The signal flags had said: Meade's headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland Georgia! Ii. In November, 1863, Lieutenant — was in an old deserted mansion near Culpeper Court-house, with some prisoners confined in the upper rooms; the enemy not being far distant. While waiting, a blaze shot up from a fire which some soldiers had kindled near, and threw the shadow of the Lieutenant on the wall. Thinki
Cumberland Georgia (search for this): chapter 2.26
hannock, to ask General Stuart why General Pleasanton of the U. S. Army had been sent to Georgia? --a dispatch by signal from corps headquarters having communicated that intelligence. Grand tableau when the affair was explained! General Stuart had signalled: Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland George's --names of persons residing near Culpeper Court-house. The signal flags had said: Meade's headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland Georgia! Ii. In November, 1863, Lieutenant — was in an old deserted mansion near Culpeper Court-house, with some prisoners confined in the upper rooms; the enemy not being far distant. While waiting, a blaze shot up from a fire which some soldiers had kindled near, and threw the shadow of the Lieutenant on the wall. Thinking the shadow was a human being he called out: Halt! there! No reply from the intruder. Answer, or I fire! The same silence-when the Lieutenant drew
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 2.26
ny of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direction of the Rapidan. You invited me and my people, said Hood, shaking hands with General Fitz, and you see I have brought them! Laughter followed, and General Fitz Lee said: Well, don't let them halloo, Here's your mule! at the review. If they do we will charge you! interrupted General Wade Hampton, laughing. For all that the graybacks of Hood, who duly attended the review, did not suppress their opinions of the cavalry. As the horsemen charged by the tall flag under which General R. E. Lee sat his horse looking at them, a weather-beaten Texan of Hood's Old Brigade turned round to a comrade and muttered: Wouldn't we clean them out, if Old Hood would only let us loose on 'em! The infantry never could forgive their cavalry brethren the possession of horses-while th
ns of Culpeper. That gay and gallant commander, General Fitz Lee, thereupon, sent word to General Hood to come and see the review, and bring any of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direction of the Rapidan. You invited me and my people, said HoodHood, shaking hands with General Fitz, and you see I have brought them! Laughter followed, and General Fitz Lee said: Well, don't let them halloo, Here's your mule! at the review. If they e will charge you! interrupted General Wade Hampton, laughing. For all that the graybacks of Hood, who duly attended the review, did not suppress their opinions of the cavalry. As the horsemen c tall flag under which General R. E. Lee sat his horse looking at them, a weather-beaten Texan of Hood's Old Brigade turned round to a comrade and muttered: Wouldn't we clean them out, if Old H
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