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Lexington, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
to get better terms. General Breckenridge was not sent to confer with General Johnston as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrender of General Lee, if that is what the writer means to assert. Mr. Davis and his Cabinet remained at Danville, Virginia, for several days after being informed of the surrender of General Lee, and then went to Greensboroa, North Carolina, where they remained a week or two. It was after we had left Greensboroa for Charlotte, North Carolina, and had gone as far as Lexington, in that State, that Mr. Davis received a dispatch from General Johnston, requesting him to send him assistance in his negotiations with General Sherman. General Breckenridge and myself were then sent back by him to join General Johnston at his headquarters, near Hillsboroa, and to aid him in his negotiations. This was done at this time, and at the suggestion of General Johnston, and not as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrender of General Lee, as supposed by General Wilson. Much as Mr
a more united people, with clearer convictions of what was involved in the struggle, probably, than any people who ever engaged in revolution, if others may so call it, not simply to preserve slavery, but to secure the rights of local self-government, and friendly government, to a homogeneous and free people; and to secure protection against a government hostile to their interests and to an institution which had been planted in this country in early Colonial times by the Christian powers of Europe, in what they understood to be the humane policy of civilizing and Christianizing a people so barbarous then that they sacrificed, ate, enslaved, and sold each other; an institution which existed in nearly all the States of the Union when the Declaration of Independence was made, and when the Federal Constitution was adopted; an institution which was protected by the Constitution and laws of the United States, and of all the States in which it existed. It was a struggle, whatever it may be
Ocmulgee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
inute facts can be mis-stated, where the error can by any means cast discredit on Mr. Davis. He states, in substance, that the ferryman, where we crossed the Ocmulgee river, had told Colonel Harnden that we had crossed the river about one o'clock in the morning. This, it may have been supposed, would produce the belief that we whis regular rides since leaving Washington, Georgia, in the day and rested at night, with the single exception of having rode across the country, north of the Ocmulgee river, a part of one night, to reach and protect his family, whom he had not seen for several weeks, against threatened evil. There is one other statement made by piney wood country to the south of these cities, where the population was more sparse, and where the roads were not so much frequented. We were to cross the Ocmulgee river below, where it could be forded, and where there were not many ferries. On approaching that river we expected to encounter trouble, if the Federal authoritie
Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ehind the little creek on which we were encamped. The firing was between these troops in, rear of us and the Wisconsin troops, who were pursuing us on the road we had traveled. When this firing occurred, as Mr. and Mrs. Davis both told me afterward, Mr. Davis started out of his tent, saying to his wife, those people have attacked us at last. (Meaning the men whom we had heard intended to rob Mr. Davis' train the night we quit our course, and went across the country to the north of the Ogeechee river.) I will go and see if I can stop the firing; surely I will have some authority with Confederates yet. His staff officers and myself were camped about one hundred yards in the direction of the firing from him, and he supposed we were being fired on, as he told us afterward. As he stepped out of his tent, as he told me that day, he saw the troops which had been posted in front of us, and which were under the immediate command of Colonel Pritchard, in full gallop toward him, and within s
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ile endeavoring to make our way to the west of the Mississippi for the purpose of continuing the struggle there, if practicable, long enough to get better terms. General Breckenridge was not sent to confer with General Johnston as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrender of General Lee, if that is what the writer means to assert. Mr. Davis and his Cabinet remained at Danville, Virginia, for several days after being informed of the surrender of General Lee, and then went to Greensboroa, North Carolina, where they remained a week or two. It was after we had left Greensboroa for Charlotte, North Carolina, and had gone as far as Lexington, in that State, that Mr. Davis received a dispatch from General Johnston, requesting him to send him assistance in his negotiations with General Sherman. General Breckenridge and myself were then sent back by him to join General Johnston at his headquarters, near Hillsboroa, and to aid him in his negotiations. This was done at this time, and at the su
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
this fiction, unrelieved by a single fact. If the writer of this paper is Major General Wilson, who was in command at Macon, Georgia, when we were captured, I shall regret that he has allowed himself to be the author of such a paper, as I felt, and still feel, under obligations to him for a personal favor when I was passing that place. When we reached Macon, where we remained a few hours, we were informed that Mr. Davis and Mr. Clay, of Alabama, who were there, would be sent on to Washington City, and that I and the other prisoners were to remain there. At my own request, I saw General Wilson, and applied to him to have the order so modified as to allow me to go on with Mr. Davis. I based this request on the ground that Mr. Davis was worn down by his labors, and in feeble health; that I was the only member of his Cabinet with him, and I hoped to be of some service to him; and as we had been together through the conflict, I desired to share his fortunes whatever they might be.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
kly times, headed Jefferson Davis flight from Richmond. You asked me to inform you how much truth t, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lethdraw his army from its position in front of Richmond and Petersburg at seven o'clock that evening,for the Governor of Virginia and the Mayor of Richmond. Directions were then given to prepare the pt; for neither she nor their children were in Richmond, or had been for three or four weeks before tth the archives and public property away from Richmond by the proper department officers, the statemd and hungry army, and having been ordered to Richmond, had taken these supplies to that place, wherwere then being carried from the South toward Richmond — I mean after Lee's retreat began. And it wavis and his Cabinet were not, when they left Richmond, laboring under the belief that General Lee ccontemplated leaving the country when we left Richmond, but two of them afterward determined to do s[3 more...]
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 11
erred to this afterward in conversation with Mr. Davis, and he told me I would remember that he wasone as far as Lexington, in that State, that Mr. Davis received a dispatch from General Johnston, r remained a few hours, we were informed that Mr. Davis and Mr. Clay, of Alabama, who were there, worossed it before it was fully dark, and that Mr. Davis had made his regular rides since leaving Wase says: Shortly after the recognition of Mr. Davis by his captors, Colonels Pritchard and Harnd children. How would you have prevented it, Mr. Davis? said Colonel Pritchard. Why, sir, I could ritchard did not come up for some time after Mr. Davis was made a prisoner. When he rode up there e in the midst of the assemblage then around Mr. Davis? Outside of those who robbed the ladies andent as to what then occurred to show that if Mr. Davis had sought to disguise himself he could not e, something like a hundred yards from where Mr. Davis and his family camped. We went into camp be[56 more...]
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 11
ossuth abandoned Hungary, and left an army behind him. I may also mention that after this General Breckenridge and myself proposed that we should take what troops we had with us and go westward, crossof this expected calamity reached them, when they turned their faces again toward the south. Breckenridge, the Secretary of War, was sent to confer with Johnston, but found him only in time to assistrpose of continuing the struggle there, if practicable, long enough to get better terms. General Breckenridge was not sent to confer with General Johnston as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrender Johnston, requesting him to send him assistance in his negotiations with General Sherman. General Breckenridge and myself were then sent back by him to join General Johnston at his headquarters, near Lee, as supposed by General Wilson. Much as Mr. Davis, no doubt, respected and esteemed General Breckenridge, it is not true that he confided his hopes to him, or to any other single person. What i
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 11
the Secretary of War, was sent to confer with Johnston, but found him only in time to assist in drawtill hoped at that time that Generals Lee and Johnston might be able to unite their armies at some p Breckenridge was not sent to confer with General Johnston as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrend, that Mr. Davis received a dispatch from General Johnston, requesting him to send him assistance inmyself were then sent back by him to join General Johnston at his headquarters, near Hillsboroa, andne at this time, and at the suggestion of General Johnston, and not as soon as Mr. Davis heard of thmination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armisticehe 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminate in forty-eight hours, here until he learned of the surrender of General Johnston, which took place on the 27th of April. when we were attacked. Governor Lubbock, Colonel Johnston, Colonel Wood, and myself had slept under[1 more...]
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