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Clement C. Clay (search for this): chapter 11
is, no doubt, a fancy sketch, intended to round up handsomely this fiction, unrelieved by a single fact. If the writer of this paper is Major General Wilson, who was in command at Macon, Georgia, when we were captured, I shall regret that he has allowed himself to be the author of such a paper, as I felt, and still feel, under obligations to him for a personal favor when I was passing that place. When we reached Macon, where we remained a few hours, we were informed that Mr. Davis and Mr. Clay, of Alabama, who were there, would be sent on to Washington City, and that I and the other prisoners were to remain there. At my own request, I saw General Wilson, and applied to him to have the order so modified as to allow me to go on with Mr. Davis. I based this request on the ground that Mr. Davis was worn down by his labors, and in feeble health; that I was the only member of his Cabinet with him, and I hoped to be of some service to him; and as we had been together through the confl
W. W. Wood (search for this): chapter 11
nd even the wish by falsehood to wrong an enemy, should have died away, General Wilson revamps and remodels the story of Mr. Davis' disguise. I will only make this statement as to what then occurred to show that if Mr. Davis had sought to disguise himself he could not have done so for want of time, and the facts show that it was impossible for him to have conceived and executed a plan of disguise. I was not immediately with him when we were attacked. Governor Lubbock, Colonel Johnston, Colonel Wood, and myself had slept under a tree, something like a hundred yards from where Mr. Davis and his family camped. We went into camp before nightfall the evening before, and had no fears of the presence of an enemy. We were misled as to our security for the time being by the following facts: We were getting well south in Georgia, with a view to turn Macon and Montgomery and pass through the piney wood country to the south of these cities, where the population was more sparse, and where the
James H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 11
ow much truth there is in the statement of General Wilson, and say that you desire my answer for pubrgotten. I have in the outset to say that General Wilson must have written his statement from infor the express purpose of carrying them off. General Wilson also says: It is stated, upon what appears any other single person. What is said by General Wilson about the last council of the Confederacy,act. If the writer of this paper is Major General Wilson, who was in command at Macon, Georgia, which took place on the 27th of April. General Wilson says: The first direct information of Mr. helming forces of a victorious army; while General Wilson, by his own statement, knew these facts, avil. There is one other statement made by General Wilson which is so gross a perversion of the trutek had then reached us. And I do not think General Wilson can have had the authority of Colonel Pris the creek (I say Colonel Harnden because General Wilson says they were his, for I did not before k[9 more...]
ate soil while there was a Confederate regiment on it. I referred to this afterward in conversation with Mr. Davis, and he told me I would remember that he was one of the Senators who refused to vote the honors of the United States Senate to General Kossuth, and that his reason was that Kossuth abandoned Hungary, and left an army behind him. I may also mention that after this General Breckenridge and myself proposed that we should take what troops we had with us and go westward, crossing the ChKossuth abandoned Hungary, and left an army behind him. I may also mention that after this General Breckenridge and myself proposed that we should take what troops we had with us and go westward, crossing the Chattahoochie between Atlanta and Chattanooga, and get as many of them across the Mississippi as we could, and in the meantime keep up the impression that Mr. Davis was with us, and for him to go to the coast of Florida and cross to Cuba, and charter a vessel under the English flag and go to Brownsville, Texas, and thence return and meet us to the west of the Mississippi. He refused to assent to this plan, on the ground that he would not abandon Confederate soil. I ought to add that we were inf
James Harrison Wilson (search for this): chapter 11
Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. Hon. John H. Reagan. On my return home, after an absence of a month, I find your letter of July 17th, inclosing a communication from General James H. Wilson to the Philadelphia weekly times, headed Jefferson Davis flight from Richmond. You asked me to inform you how much truth there is in the statement of General Wilson, and say that you desire my answer for publication, and request me to make it full. My answer is at your disposal, and may be published or not, as you think best. I will answer this article as well as I can remember the facts at this date, and those which are material, so far as they come to my knowledge, were doubtless so impressed on my mind by the deep interest of the occasion that they will not be forgotten. I have in the outset to say that General Wilson must have written his statement from information derived from others, as he could not personally have known the facts about which he writes; and that he has either
T. R. Cobb (search for this): chapter 11
tizens, however, that Davis, instead of observing the armistice, was making his way toward the south with an escort, I took possession of the railroads and sent scouts in all directions in order that I might receive timely notice of his movements. He then confesses to having violated the terms of the armistice, but excuses himself by saying that he had heard from citizens that Mr. Davis was violating it by going south with an escort. He says the first he heard of the armistice was from Generals Cobb and Smith, at Macon, Georgia, on the 20th day of April. That after that he was advised of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my [General Wilson's] command. He also says that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armistice was agreed to on the 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston i
B. N. Harrison (search for this): chapter 11
river, about dusk, we found no opposition, and, at the same time, learned that there was a considerable cavalry force at Hawkinsville, twenty-three miles up the river from where we crossed it. Learning that this force was so near, and seeing that the ferries were not guarded, we concluded our course was not known at that time, and traveled rather slowly the succeeding day, and went into camp, early in the evening before we were captured, with the understanding from Mr. Davis that he, Mr. Harrison, his staff officers and myself would probably go on after supper and leave his family, then supposed to be out of reach of. danger, which caused us to leave our course and join them. I state all this to show our feeling of temporary security, and the reasons why we felt and acted as we did. The first warning we had of present danger was the firing just across the little creek we were camped on, which took place between the Wisconsin and Michigan cavalry, between day-dawn and full light.
M. L. Smith (search for this): chapter 11
r, that Davis, instead of observing the armistice, was making his way toward the south with an escort, I took possession of the railroads and sent scouts in all directions in order that I might receive timely notice of his movements. He then confesses to having violated the terms of the armistice, but excuses himself by saying that he had heard from citizens that Mr. Davis was violating it by going south with an escort. He says the first he heard of the armistice was from Generals Cobb and Smith, at Macon, Georgia, on the 20th day of April. That after that he was advised of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my [General Wilson's] command. He also says that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armistice was agreed to on the 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would termin
Shenandoah (search for this): chapter 11
e, discussing the matter fully with his Cabinet in profound secrecy, and deciding that, in order to secure the escape of himself and his principal officers, the Shenandoah should be ordered to cruise off the coast of Florida to take the fugitives aboard. These orders were sent to the rebel cruiser many days before Lee's lines werent, why did he not advise his readers what his authority was? No such question, nor any other question as to the means of escape, or as to instructions to the Shenandoah to facilitate such an escape, was ever considered by the Cabinet; nor, so far as I know or believe, was any such question considered or discussed with any membels Grant and Sherman, and turn upon and defeat one of them, and take their chances for defeating the other by fighting them in detail. If I knew then where the Shenandoah was, I have now forgotten, and I certainly never heard the subject mentioned of an intended or desired escape from the country by her. I think I am entirely
f the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee, I have not discovered it. On the contrary,mond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial formed of two dispatches just received from General Lee, stating briefly the circumstances which maad carried provisions to Amelia Court-House for Lee's hard-pressed and hungry army, and having beend from the South toward Richmond — I mean after Lee's retreat began. And it was a train of passengd authority, that Davis had, many weeks before Lee's catastrophe, made the careful and exacting prwere sent to the rebel cruiser many days before Lee's lines were broken, etc. If the writer believe any time, before or after the surrender of General Lee. Nor do I believe that any man who regardsft Richmond, laboring under the belief that General Lee could avoid surrendering only a short time.ys after being informed of the surrender of General Lee, and then went to Greensboroa, North Caroli[4 more...]
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