hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 580 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 564 12 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 485 5 Browse Search
George G. Meade 378 0 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 319 1 Browse Search
Grant Ulysses Grant 308 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 268 2 Browse Search
Ewell 268 46 Browse Search
Billy Sherman 266 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). Search the whole document.

Found 340 total hits in 61 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
ked toward his residence, which was a few hundred yards off, to confer with him about it, and on the way met him and Governor Lubbock, of his staff. We three then walked on to the Executive office. He then assembled his Cabinet, and sent for the Gocan give my words, that I was present at the time Mr. Davis and Colonel Pritchard recognized each other, as was also Governor Lubbock, and that there is not one truth stated in this whole paragraph. Colonel Pritchard did not come up for some time afe for him to have conceived and executed a plan of disguise. I was not immediately with him when we were attacked. Governor Lubbock, Colonel Johnston, Colonel Wood, and myself had slept under a tree, something like a hundred yards from where Mr. Dahrew a waterproof cloak around his shoulders; he stepped out, and was immediately put under arrest. Directly afterward, Lubbock and myself went to him, where he was surrounded by the soldiers. He then had no cloak or other wrapping on him; was dre
Grant Ulysses Grant (search for this): chapter 11
so much of this as refers to the supposed plan of escape. The writer seems to have been in the same predicament as many others have been, who have sought to force or to make facts to suit fanciful theories. Mr. Davis and his Cabinet were not, when they left Richmond, laboring under the belief that General Lee could avoid surrendering only a short time. It was still hoped at that time that Generals Lee and Johnston might be able to unite their armies at some point between the armies of Generals Grant and Sherman, and turn upon and defeat one of them, and take their chances for defeating the other by fighting them in detail. If I knew then where the Shenandoah was, I have now forgotten, and I certainly never heard the subject mentioned of an intended or desired escape from the country by her. I think I am entirely safe in saying that neither Mr. Davis nor any member of his Cabinet contemplated leaving the country when we left Richmond, but two of them afterward determined to do s
Billy Sherman (search for this): chapter 11
p the terms of his celebrated capitulation to Sherman. The intelligence of this event caused the roint between the armies of Generals Grant and Sherman, and turn upon and defeat one of them, and tad him assistance in his negotiations with General Sherman. General Breckenridge and myself were thence: He says that after he was advised by General Sherman of the armistice which was entered into br that he was advised of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my s that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostie 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminhe notice of its termination was given by General Sherman, and until the expiration of the forty-eiiting the result of the negotiations with General Sherman, and afterward the termination of the armses he was, after he had been notified by General Sherman that the armistice was binding on him. An[1 more...]
the country by her. I think I am entirely safe in saying that neither Mr. Davis nor any member of his Cabinet contemplated leaving the country when we left Richmond, but two of them afterward determined to do so. And I do not believe that Mr. Davis or any other member of his Cabinet afterward desired to leave the country. Mr. Trenholm, prostrated by a long and dangerous illness, resigned his position as Secretary of the Treasury while we were on our way south, and went to his home. Mr. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, and Mr. Davis, Attorney General, went to their homes, and all of them remained there until put under arrest by the authority of the United States. Mr. Davis and myself were captured while endeavoring to make our way to the west of the Mississippi for the purpose of continuing the struggle there, if practicable, long enough to get better terms. General Breckenridge was not sent to confer with General Johnston as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrender of General
m in detail. If I knew then where the Shenandoah was, I have now forgotten, and I certainly never heard the subject mentioned of an intended or desired escape from the country by her. I think I am entirely safe in saying that neither Mr. Davis nor any member of his Cabinet contemplated leaving the country when we left Richmond, but two of them afterward determined to do so. And I do not believe that Mr. Davis or any other member of his Cabinet afterward desired to leave the country. Mr. Trenholm, prostrated by a long and dangerous illness, resigned his position as Secretary of the Treasury while we were on our way south, and went to his home. Mr. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, and Mr. Davis, Attorney General, went to their homes, and all of them remained there until put under arrest by the authority of the United States. Mr. Davis and myself were captured while endeavoring to make our way to the west of the Mississippi for the purpose of continuing the struggle there, if pract
Montgomery (search for this): chapter 11
executed a plan of disguise. I was not immediately with him when we were attacked. Governor Lubbock, Colonel Johnston, Colonel Wood, and myself had slept under a tree, something like a hundred yards from where Mr. Davis and his family camped. We went into camp before nightfall the evening before, and had no fears of the presence of an enemy. We were misled as to our security for the time being by the following facts: We were getting well south in Georgia, with a view to turn Macon and Montgomery and pass through the piney wood country to the south of these cities, where the population was more sparse, and where the roads were not so much frequented. We were to cross the Ocmulgee river below, where it could be forded, and where there were not many ferries. On approaching that river we expected to encounter trouble, if the Federal authorities knew the course we were traveling. In this event we supposed the ferries would be guarded. When we crossed the river, about dusk, we found
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 11
and circulate any story which they thought would gratify hate and bring ridicule on the leader of a brave people, who had risked all and lost all in a cause as dear to them as life; and under whom vast armies had been organized, many great battles had been fought, and a mighty struggle carried on for four years, which had shaken this continent, and arrested the attention of the civilized world; and which was then being supported by a million Federal soldiers, as was afterward shown by President Johnson; the leader of a cause sustained by a more united people, with clearer convictions of what was involved in the struggle, probably, than any people who ever engaged in revolution, if others may so call it, not simply to preserve slavery, but to secure the rights of local self-government, and friendly government, to a homogeneous and free people; and to secure protection against a government hostile to their interests and to an institution which had been planted in this country in early
John H. Reagan (search for this): chapter 11
Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. Hon. John H. Reagan. On my return home, after an absence of a month, I find your letter of July 17th, inclosing a communication from General James H. Wilson to the Philadelphia weekly times, headed Jefferson Davis flight from Richmond. You asked me to inform you how much truth there is in the statement of General Wilson, and say that you desire my answer for publication, and request me to make it full. My answer is at your disposal, and may be published or not, as you think best. I will answer this article as well as I can remember the facts at this date, and those which are material, so far as they come to my knowledge, were doubtless so impressed on my mind by the deep interest of the occasion that they will not be forgotten. I have in the outset to say that General Wilson must have written his statement from information derived from others, as he could not personally have known the facts about which he writes; and that he has either
Henry Harnden (search for this): chapter 11
He states, in substance, that the ferryman, where we crossed the Ocmulgee river, had told Colonel Harnden that we had crossed the river about one o'clock in the morning. This, it may have been sup He says: Shortly after the recognition of Mr. Davis by his captors, Colonels Pritchard and Harnden rode up to where the group were standing. Davis, recognizing them as officers, asked which of s women and children. He only pointed to the fact that they were being robbed. I doubt if Colonel Harnden had then reached where we were; but of this I do not profess to know. I only know that a f Directly after this, and about the time the firing ceased between Colonel Pritchard's and Colonel Harnden's troops across the creek (I say Colonel Harnden because General Wilson says they were his,Colonel Harnden because General Wilson says they were his, for I did not before know what officer commanded them), it was that the conversation above alluded to took place between Mr. Davis and Colonel Pritchard. From these facts the impossibility of M
recognition of Mr. Davis by his captors, Colonels Pritchard and Harnden rode up to where the group w you have prevented it, Mr. Davis? said Colonel Pritchard. Why, sir, I could have fought you or el I was present at the time Mr. Davis and Colonel Pritchard recognized each other, as was also Govere truth stated in this whole paragraph. Colonel Pritchard did not come up for some time after Mr. d and asked: Who commands these troops? Colonel Pritchard replied, without hesitation, that he did robbers. They rob women and children. Colonel Pritchard then said: Mr. Davis, you should remembe. Was this miserable falsehood about Colonel Pritchard saying to Mr. Davis, I don't think your ed, and made conclusive by the fact that Colonel Pritchard so called attention to this disguise in valry, between day-dawn and full light. Colonel Pritchard, as I afterward learned from him, had sohich were under the immediate command of Colonel Pritchard, in full gallop toward him, and within s[6 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7