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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). Search the whole document.

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April 18th (search for this): chapter 11
with an escort. He says the first he heard of the armistice was from Generals Cobb and Smith, at Macon, Georgia, on the 20th day of April. That after that he was advised of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my [General Wilson's] command. He also says that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armistice was agreed to on the 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminate in forty-eight hours, leaving the parties bound by its terms until the 26th of April. Mr. Davis was at Charlotte when the treaty and armistice was agreed to. He remained there under the terms of the armistice until the notice of its termination was given by General Sherman, and until the expiration of the forty-eight hours, when it was finally terminated, and did not leave there until he learned of the
egiously imposed on. I have read the slip you send me twice carefully over; and if there is a single truth in it, outside of the great historical facts incidentally referred to, of the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee, I have not discovered it. On the contrary, it is made up of statements which are utterly void of truth. I will call attention to some of them. The statement has been made by General Wilson, as it has been made in many other newspaper articles, that On the first Sunday in April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity of flight. On that point I make this statement: On the Sunday referred to, I went by the War Department on my way to church. When at the department I was informed of two dispatches just received from General Lee, stating briefly the circumstances which made it necessary for hi
April 20th (search for this): chapter 11
armistice, was making his way toward the south with an escort, I took possession of the railroads and sent scouts in all directions in order that I might receive timely notice of his movements. He then confesses to having violated the terms of the armistice, but excuses himself by saying that he had heard from citizens that Mr. Davis was violating it by going south with an escort. He says the first he heard of the armistice was from Generals Cobb and Smith, at Macon, Georgia, on the 20th day of April. That after that he was advised of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my [General Wilson's] command. He also says that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armistice was agreed to on the 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminate in forty-eight hours, leaving the p
April 26th (search for this): chapter 11
of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my [General Wilson's] command. He also says that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armistice was agreed to on the 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminate in forty-eight hours, leaving the parties bound by its terms until the 26th of April. Mr. Davis was at Charlotte when the treaty and armistice was agreed to. He remained there under the terms of the armistice until the notice of its termination was given by General Sherman, and until the expiration of the forty-eight hours, when it was finally terminated, and did not leave there until he learned of the surrender of General Johnston, which took place on the 27th of April. General Wilson says: The first direct information of Mr. Davis' movements reached me on the 23d o
April, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 11
. I have read the slip you send me twice carefully over; and if there is a single truth in it, outside of the great historical facts incidentally referred to, of the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee, I have not discovered it. On the contrary, it is made up of statements which are utterly void of truth. I will call attention to some of them. The statement has been made by General Wilson, as it has been made in many other newspaper articles, that On the first Sunday in April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity of flight. On that point I make this statement: On the Sunday referred to, I went by the War Department on my way to church. When at the department I was informed of two dispatches just received from General Lee, stating briefly the circumstances which made it necessary for him to withdraw his a
Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. Hon. John H. Reagan. On my return home, after an absence of a month, I find your letter of July 17th, inclosing a communication from General James H. Wilson to the Philadelphia weekly times, headed Jefferson Davis flight from Richmond. You asked me to inform you how much truth there is in the statement of General Wilson, and say that you desire my answer for publication, and request me to make it full. My answer is at your disposal, and may be published or not, as you think best. I will answer this article as well as I can remember the facts at this date, and those which are material, so far as they come to my knowledge, were doubtless so impressed on my mind by the deep interest of the occasion that they will not be forgotten. I have in the outset to say that General Wilson must have written his statement from information derived from others, as he could not personally have known the facts about which he writes; and that he has either
April 24th (search for this): chapter 11
he first he heard of the armistice was from Generals Cobb and Smith, at Macon, Georgia, on the 20th day of April. That after that he was advised of its existence by General Sherman, and that it was intended to apply to my [General Wilson's] command. He also says that in a short time he was informed by General Sherman, by telegram, of the termination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armistice was agreed to on the 18th of April, and on the 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminate in forty-eight hours, leaving the parties bound by its terms until the 26th of April. Mr. Davis was at Charlotte when the treaty and armistice was agreed to. He remained there under the terms of the armistice until the notice of its termination was given by General Sherman, and until the expiration of the forty-eight hours, when it was finally terminated, and did not leave there until he learned of the surrender of General John
through the conflict, I desired to share his fortunes whatever they might be. After some remarks by him about the danger I would invoke on myself, and my reply that I had fully considered all that, he said that he would see if the order could not be changed, and before we left there we were notified that we were all to go together. While I regretted that some others were sent on, I was grateful to him for the favor done me. Since writing the foregoing the Philadelphia weekly times, of July 7th, has been put in my hands, which contains what I suppose to be the whole of General Wilson's letter. Much of it appears to be an account of military orders and of military operations with which he was connected, and about which I have no personal knowledge. What I wrote above had only reference to the portion of his letter which was then before me (the first two paragraphs of it), and has no reference to what he afterward says about military operations His paper is long and I have not lei
April 23rd (search for this): chapter 11
April. Mr. Davis was at Charlotte when the treaty and armistice was agreed to. He remained there under the terms of the armistice until the notice of its termination was given by General Sherman, and until the expiration of the forty-eight hours, when it was finally terminated, and did not leave there until he learned of the surrender of General Johnston, which took place on the 27th of April. General Wilson says: The first direct information of Mr. Davis' movements reached me on the 23d of April, from a citizen, now a prominent lawyer and politician of Georgia, who had seen him at Charlotte, North Carolina, only three or four days before, and had learned that he was on his way, with a train and escort of cavalry, to the south. This citizen may have seen Mr. Davis at the time named at Charlotte. But if he did, he saw him halted there, awaiting the result of the negotiations with General Sherman, and afterward the termination of the armistice, until the 27th or 28th of April, wi
April 28th (search for this): chapter 11
the 23d of April, from a citizen, now a prominent lawyer and politician of Georgia, who had seen him at Charlotte, North Carolina, only three or four days before, and had learned that he was on his way, with a train and escort of cavalry, to the south. This citizen may have seen Mr. Davis at the time named at Charlotte. But if he did, he saw him halted there, awaiting the result of the negotiations with General Sherman, and afterward the termination of the armistice, until the 27th or 28th of April, with perfect good faith and honor, and not violating a solemn engagement, always binding on the true soldiers and honorable men, as General Wilson confesses he was, after he had been notified by General Sherman that the armistice was binding on him. And this violation of faith was aggravated by the fact that Mr. Davis was then struggling with defeat and disaster, environed on all sides by two overwhelming forces of a victorious army; while General Wilson, by his own statement, knew thes
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