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Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
cord my vote against it, which they promised to do; I, on my part, promising to report to them the particulars of my proposed interview. It was about four o'clock in the afternoon when I left the Capitol, and driving rapidly to Willard's, where the President-elect had a suite of rooms fronting the avenue, the first person I met on reaching the hotel was an old acquaintance from the county of Berkeley, Virginia, Colonel Ward H. Lamon, Mr. Lincoln's law partner and compagnon de voyage from Springfield to Washington, who, on learning my wishes, kindly undertook to ascertain if Mr. Lincoln, whom he had just left alone, would see me. He soon came down with an invitation to walk up stairs, and as I did so, accompanied by the Colonel, I noticed that the corridors were strictly guarded by policemen — an unnecessary but natural precaution under the circumstances of apprehension and excitement that then prevailed in Washington. On being introduced, Mr. Lincoln greeted me with great kindne
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
two days thereafter. For God's sake, for the country's sake, do not let it pass! Yours, truly, Jos. Segar. Hon. A. R. Boteler, House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. The bill referred to in the foregoing letter had been reported to the House, on the 18th of February, from the Committee on Military Affairs, by its chairmotel was an old acquaintance from the county of Berkeley, Virginia, Colonel Ward H. Lamon, Mr. Lincoln's law partner and compagnon de voyage from Springfield to Washington, who, on learning my wishes, kindly undertook to ascertain if Mr. Lincoln, whom he had just left alone, would see me. He soon came down with an invitation to wrridors were strictly guarded by policemen — an unnecessary but natural precaution under the circumstances of apprehension and excitement that then prevailed in Washington. On being introduced, Mr. Lincoln greeted me with great kindness and cordiality. I'm glad to see you, said he; always glad to see an Old Line Whig. Sit do
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
in all earnestness, that the passage, at this time, of Mr. Stanton's Force bill will do us, in Virginia, infinite harm. The disunionists, one and all, will clap their hands in very ecstacy, if the msaid to him: Mr. Stanton, your bill is thwarting the efforts of the conservative men of Virginia, who are striving to prevent her secession, and to avert the calamity of civil war. If you persention at Richmond, though now in a minority, will be enabled thereby to carry their point, and Virginia will be forced out of the Union against her will. Well! said he, folding his arms, and leaangry feeling it had excited in Congress, and of the painful anxieties it had caused throughout Virginia; how it had demoralized the members of her State convention, and was frustrating the patriotic ay to you, in all sincerity, that the passage of this Force bill will paralyze the Unionists of Virginia, and be the means of precipitating her into secession-a calamity which, at this juncture, will
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
extended the provisions of the Act of 1795, for calling forth the militia, and those of the Act of 1807, for the employment of the land and naval forces of the United States, so as not only to place the latter — the regular army and navy-at the disposal of the incoming President, but also to confer on him the plenary power to call tia, and to authorize him, beside, to accept the services of an unlimited number of volunteers, who should be on the same footing as the regular forces of the United States, and whose officers should all be commissioned by himself. On the day after the introduction of the bill, and before an opportunity was had to examine its f affairs in those Southern States of the Union which are assuming to be no longer part of it. How about enforcing the laws in them, just now — the laws of the United States? Inasmuch, I replied, as the difficulties of doing so peaceably, under existing circumstances, are exceeded only by the dangers of attempting it forcibly, the
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
bilities of our people are already wounded. If the bill passes, I verily believe that an ordinance of Secession will be passed in two days thereafter. For God's sake, for the country's sake, do not let it pass! Yours, truly, Jos. Segar. Hon. A. R. Boteler, House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. The bill referred to in the foregoing letter had been reported to the House, on the 18th of February, from the Committee on Military Affairs, by its chairman, the Hon. Benjamin Stanton, of Ohio. It extended the provisions of the Act of 1795, for calling forth the militia, and those of the Act of 1807, for the employment of the land and naval forces of the United States, so as not only to place the latter — the regular army and navy-at the disposal of the incoming President, but also to confer on him the plenary power to call out and control the militia, and to authorize him, beside, to accept the services of an unlimited number of volunteers, who should be on the same footing as t
Berkeley County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
up the bill in my absence, to do me the favor to filibuster on it until I could get back to record my vote against it, which they promised to do; I, on my part, promising to report to them the particulars of my proposed interview. It was about four o'clock in the afternoon when I left the Capitol, and driving rapidly to Willard's, where the President-elect had a suite of rooms fronting the avenue, the first person I met on reaching the hotel was an old acquaintance from the county of Berkeley, Virginia, Colonel Ward H. Lamon, Mr. Lincoln's law partner and compagnon de voyage from Springfield to Washington, who, on learning my wishes, kindly undertook to ascertain if Mr. Lincoln, whom he had just left alone, would see me. He soon came down with an invitation to walk up stairs, and as I did so, accompanied by the Colonel, I noticed that the corridors were strictly guarded by policemen — an unnecessary but natural precaution under the circumstances of apprehension and excitement that t
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
he eventful Congress that immediately preceded the war, I received a number of letters from conservative sources similar in their import to the following from a well-known Union man, who was at that time a member of the Virginia Legislature: Richmond, Va., February 25th, 1861. My Dear Sir: Let me say to you, in all earnestness, that the passage, at this time, of Mr. Stanton's Force bill will do us, in Virginia, infinite harm. The disunionists, one and all, will clap their hands in very ecsriving to prevent her secession, and to avert the calamity of civil war. If you persist in its passage, the effect will be to convince our people that the policy of coercion is a foregone conclusion. The secessionists of our State convention at Richmond, though now in a minority, will be enabled thereby to carry their point, and Virginia will be forced out of the Union against her will. Well! said he, folding his arms, and leaning back in his chair, Well, what if she does go? If that is t
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
an be carried into effect, which, as the Peace Conference here has failed to secure a compromise, is the ultimate reliance left us for that object. I then went on to say: Mr. Lincoln, it may seem presumptuous in me to express my opinion to you on these subjects so decidedly. But I speak frankly, because I feel deeply their vital importance to the whole country, and especially to the people of the district which I represent, which is a border district, stretching along the Potomac from the Alleghenies to tidewater, and which, in the event of a sectional civil war, will not only be the first to suffer from its effects, but will feel them first, last, and all the time, and in all their intensity. I speak to you as a Union man, from a Union county, of a Union district, of a Union State--a State which has done more to make and to maintain the Union than any of her sister States have had it in their power to do, and which now, from her known conservatism, her acknowledged prestige in nat
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
k before Mr. Stanton succeeded in getting the bill up for consideration, and immediately thereupon, a leading Republican member from Mr. Lincoln's own State (Mr. Washburne, our distinguished Minister to France), moved an adjournment; but a question of order having arisen, Mr. Washburne's motion was not entertained. Shortly afterward, Mr. Stanton moved the previous question on the engrossment of the bill, which was followed by another motion to adjourn, made by a prominent Republican from Pennsylvania (Mr. Hickman), which was not put to vote, because the floor had not been yielded to Mr. Hickman by Mr. John Cochrane, of New York, who was entitled to it, but who himself, before taking his seat, renewed the motion for an adjournment; and although it was well understood on both sides of the House that Cochrane's motion involved the fate of the bill, it was finally agreed to by a vote of seventy-seven to sixty. So the House adjourned that evening, and the Thirty-sixth Congress expired on
France (France) (search for this): chapter 17
the Peace Congress, were of an exciting character, and afforded a significant illustration of the truth of the proverb that extremes meet; for when the ayes and nays were called, Abolitionists and Secessionists per se were found voting together against the suspension. It was nearly ten o'clock before Mr. Stanton succeeded in getting the bill up for consideration, and immediately thereupon, a leading Republican member from Mr. Lincoln's own State (Mr. Washburne, our distinguished Minister to France), moved an adjournment; but a question of order having arisen, Mr. Washburne's motion was not entertained. Shortly afterward, Mr. Stanton moved the previous question on the engrossment of the bill, which was followed by another motion to adjourn, made by a prominent Republican from Pennsylvania (Mr. Hickman), which was not put to vote, because the floor had not been yielded to Mr. Hickman by Mr. John Cochrane, of New York, who was entitled to it, but who himself, before taking his seat, ren
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