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S. Wylie Crawford (search for this): chapter 37
fin's Division forward on the old pike, while the remainder of the corps, with Crawford's Division leading, moved on a neighborhood road toward Parkers store. It was not long before Griffin met the Confederates; and as Crawford approached the plank road, he met the cavalry coming to the rear, reporting them advancing on that roarts of General Lee's troops being on each of these two roads having been made, Crawford was ordered to halt, and informed that Griffin and Wadsworth would attack on torth's Divisions, supported by Robinson's Division and McCandless' Brigade, of Crawford's Division-all of Fifth Corps. When Warren's advance up the old pike was arre and the reported movement of the Confederates down the plank road had caused Crawford to halt before it was reached, Generals Grant and Meade had (according to Mr. ons, Fifth Corps, supported by Robinson's Division and McCandless' Brigade, of Crawford's Division, of the same corps. It has been seen that Heth's Division alone re
e enemy on his extreme right flank (Seymour's Brigade), and involving the whole of the right two divisions, Wright's and Rickett's, of the Sixth Corps. This attack was followed soon by Hancock advancing a heavy force on the plank road. On this the of Early's Division, and Johnson's Brigade, of Rodes' Division. These brigades, Gordon's leading, struck the Federals (Rickett's Division) on its right flank, doubling it up and causing great confusion. At the same time, Pegram's Brigade, of Earlward. Leasure's Brigade, of the Ninth Corps, was also engaged. On the pile, early in the morning of the 6th, were Rickett's and Wright's Divisions, Sixth Corps; in the afternoon, Rickett's and the greater part of the Sixth Corps; Burnside's CRickett's and the greater part of the Sixth Corps; Burnside's Corps (Ninth), with the exception of Stephenson's Division and Leasure's Brigade, not engaged. A body of troops, on the 6th, appeared in front of Wilcox's Division, then between Ewell and the Confederates, on the plank road; a few shots from a batte
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 37
Mountain, which was eight miles from Orange; Longstreet, after his return from East Tennessee, remai 5th-Anderson's, of Hill's Corps, and two of Longstreet's. There was less than twenty-six thousand has been instructed to move forward; he and Longstreet will be up, and the two divisions that have condition of his command. His response was, Longstreet must be here; go bring him up. Galloping tok on that flank, owing to the non-arrival of Longstreet, that for a time it seemed as though a great stronger language than that employed by General Longstreet in a description he gave the writer of t one and a half miles it would have run over Longstreet's command marching by the flank. It was not possible for General Longstreet, reaching the field at the time he did, to have known from what poid ample time for Anderson to arrive, and for Longstreet to form, and when Hancock renewed the advancng the enemy's right; and on the plank road, Longstreet made a vigorous attack, and in the midst of [4 more...]
rrange his line and the delay in the arrival of the three rear divisions, was near proving fatal to the Confederates. By ten P. M. all was quiet; occasionally a man that had been sent to the rear on some errand, would be seen returning to the front. It seemed almost impossible to realize that so fierce a battle had been fought and terminating only two hours before, or that so many armed men were lying almost within reach, At an early hour of the night, after the battle was over, Colonel Baldwin, of the First Massachusetts Regiment, stepped a short distance to the front to get a drink of water from a stream quite near, and found himself in the midst of Confederates, and was made a prisoner. Colonel Davidson, Seventh North Carolina Regiment, became a prisoner to the Union forces in the same manner, and near the same place. ready to spring forward at early dawn to renew the bloody work. The night was clear and cloudless, but with the tall forest trees and thick underwood nothin
on the left of the road to take position on the left of Heth, and fought in line nearly parallel to the road. The enemy were in the rear of the left of Heth. Thomas did not get into position on his left. The fourth and last brigade of Wilcox's (Lane's) went in on the right of the road and extreme right of the line, the musketry now raging furiously on the entire front. Wilcox rode forward down the road, found that McGowan's Brigade had swept like a gale through the woods, driving back all bed's Division, of the same corps. It has been seen that Heth's Division alone received, on the plank road, the first attack, and bore the brunt of it till the arrival of Wilcox's brigades (McGowan's and Scales'), to be soon followed by Thomas' and Lane's Brigades, and that these reinforcing brigades were sent in on such points as were believed to be most sorely pressed, or where they could be best used. When the battle closed Wilcox was in front, and his line much disjointed-one brigade had fou
Maxwell T. Davidson (search for this): chapter 37
would be seen returning to the front. It seemed almost impossible to realize that so fierce a battle had been fought and terminating only two hours before, or that so many armed men were lying almost within reach, At an early hour of the night, after the battle was over, Colonel Baldwin, of the First Massachusetts Regiment, stepped a short distance to the front to get a drink of water from a stream quite near, and found himself in the midst of Confederates, and was made a prisoner. Colonel Davidson, Seventh North Carolina Regiment, became a prisoner to the Union forces in the same manner, and near the same place. ready to spring forward at early dawn to renew the bloody work. The night was clear and cloudless, but with the tall forest trees and thick underwood nothing could be seen save the road along which the wounded were now no longer borne. A line had been determined in the early hours of the night on which it would be suggested the newly arrived troops should form; but twel
the Federals. On the Union side, early in the morning, on the plank road, there was the same force as on the previous evening; but after Wilcox was forced back, Getty's Division was held in the rear, and Stephenson's Division, of the Ninth Corps, thrown forward. Leasure's Brigade, of the Ninth Corps, was also engaged. On the pile, early in the morning of the 6th, were Rickett's and Wright's Divisions, Sixth Corps; in the afternoon, Rickett's and the greater part of the Sixth Corps; Burnside's Corps (Ninth), with the exception of Stephenson's Division and Leasure's Brigade, not engaged. A body of troops, on the 6th, appeared in front of Wilcox's Division, then between Ewell and the Confederates, on the plank road; a few shots from a battery was all that was used against them. They were supposed to be of the Ninth Corps. Such was the battle of the Wilderness. The impression has been made that the Federals attacked the Confederates in a position carefully selected. The la
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 37
eet South, crossed the Rapidan and advanced on Meade. The latter retired rapidly, not halting untited. General Lee returned to the Rapidan, and Meade to his old camp in Culpepper. The latter part of November (the second exception), Meade crossed the Rapidan below the Confederate right. Genera historian states that at about nine A. M. General Meade, addressing some officers near him, said: fellows from getting back to Mine run. If General Meade was correctly quoted, it is evident that Mected the errors into which Generals Grant and Meade had fallen in supposing General Lee would retifiring borne to the ears of Generals Grant and Meade, at the old Wilderness tavern, attested the senown North as the place where Generals Lee and Meade confronted each other for a week the winter prught the protection of the Mine run line. General Meade and the Army of the Potomac knew Mine run run) position, which had been regarded by General Meade as too formidable to assail, that made him[6 more...]
eneral Jones and his aide, Lieutenant Early, in endeavoring to restore order, were both killed. Battle's Brigade, of Rodes' Division, on the right of Jones' Brigade, shared a like fate. Jones' Brigade was believed by its division commander to have been forced back in consequence of the artillery having been changed in position or withdrawn without his knowledge. The other brigades of Johnson's Division held their ground. Early's Division was ordered up, and Gordon's Brigade of this, with Doles', Daniels', and Ramseur's brigades of Rodes' Division-Gordon on the right-advanced and drove the enemy back some distance. Johnson, in the meantime, was fighting heavily and successfully. Quite a number of prisoners and two pieces of artillery were captured. After the Federals had been driven back there was a pause in the fighting, when Hays' Brigade of Early's Division moved around to the extreme left of Johnson's Division, in order to take part in the general forward movement; the br
Grant Ulysses Grant (search for this): chapter 37
sted, in the popular opinion of the North, General Grant was regarded as the most successful, and ithe highest mission. The reputation of General Grant, before serving in Virginia, was due mostl best results to the fortunate side. When General Grant was assigned to duty as above stated, the etc. These words make the impression that General Grant believed he had a serious undertaking on h a man left, or an armed enemy to oppose. General Grant, after deliberating whether he should cros The Army of the Potomac, now directed by General Grant, began to move, twelve A. M., on the 4th oed Crawford to halt before it was reached, Generals Grant and Meade had (according to Mr. Swinton) jat stream the December preceding. But had Generals Grant and Meade so willed, by being a little morilure that corrected the errors into which Generals Grant and Meade had fallen in supposing General r cover of the impregnable Mine run lines, General Grant abandoned the Wilderness and uncovered Gen[12 more...]
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