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La Grange (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
belief that they were invincible. It will be remembered that after the capture of Selma, on April 2d (which took place at nightfall of the very Sunday that Davis fled from Richmond), and the passage of the victorious cavalry to the south side of the Alabama, their march was directed to the eastward by the way of Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon; while a detached brigade, under Croxton, moved rapidly in the same direction, by a more northern route, through Jasper, Talladega, and La Grange. The limits of this sketch forbid a detailed narrative of how these gallant troopers captured the last stronghold of the Confederacy, pausing in their march to raise the National flag over the first rebel capitol; how the astonished rebel ladies at the beautiful village of Tuskegee bedecked their horses with flowers as a reward for perfect discipline and good behavior; how they spared one printing press, claimed by a strong-mined woman, upon the condition that she and her descendants, unt
) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
t Mr. Davis had insisted upon reserving, it for exigencies, and it was now secured in his baggage. He did not forget his sword. That, a costly present from some of his admirers in England, had been sent to the Richmond armory for some repairs; it was abandoned to the fire there. The last seen of this relic of the Southern Confederacy was a twisted and gnarled stem of steel, on private exhibition in a lager beer saloon in Richmond, garnished with a certificate that it was what remained of Jeff Davis' sword, and that the curiosity might be purchased for two hundred dollars. Mr. Davis was accompanied at the first stage of his flight by some of his personal staff and three members of his Cabinet-General Breckenridge, Secretary of War; Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of State, and Mr. Reagan, Postmaster General. His wife was in North Carolina. (Pages 508 and 509.) Just what the historian means by this. extract I leave Mr. Reagan and Mr. Davis to reconcile with the facts. The.declaration i
Jonesboro (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
as follows: General Upton, with parts of two regiments, occupied Augusta, and kept a vigilant watch over the country in that vicinity, informing me by telegraph of everything important which came under his observation. General Winslow, with the larger part of Upton's Division, occupied Atlanta, and scouted the country in all directions from that place. General Alexander, with five hundred picked men, patrolled the country north of the Chattahoochee, while detachments occupied Griffin and Jonesboroa, closely watching the crossing of the Ocmulgee, and scouting the country to the eastward. Colonel Eggleston, commanding the post of Atlanta, had also sent a detachment to West Point, to watch the Alabama line in that quarter. General Croxton, with the main body of the First Division, in reserve near Macon, had sent a detachment to the mountain region of Alabama, marching by the way of Carrolton to Talladega, another through Northeastern Georgia toward North Carolina, and was also engage
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 42
s until, under cover of the night, he got, unobserved, on the train that was to convey him from Richmond. He did not forget the gold in the Treasury; that, amounting to less than forty thousand dollars, it had been proposed some days before, in Congress, to distribute as largesses to the discontented soldiers; but Mr. Davis had insisted upon reserving, it for exigencies, and it was now secured in his baggage. He did not forget his sword. That, a costly present from some of his admirers in England, had been sent to the Richmond armory for some repairs; it was abandoned to the fire there. The last seen of this relic of the Southern Confederacy was a twisted and gnarled stem of steel, on private exhibition in a lager beer saloon in Richmond, garnished with a certificate that it was what remained of Jeff Davis' sword, and that the curiosity might be purchased for two hundred dollars. Mr. Davis was accompanied at the first stage of his flight by some of his personal staff and three memb
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 42
particularly that Mr. Johnson had succeeded to the Presidency, adding that both he and the Southern people would find him much more implacable and vindictive than Mr. Lincoln. He remarked, in reference to the reward offered for his arrest, as an accomplice in the assassination, that, while he was surprised that such a charge should have been brought against him, he had no serious apprehension of trouble therefrom. In this connection, he said: I doubt not, General, the Government of the United States will bring a much more serious charge against me than that, and one which it will give me much greater trouble to disprove --evidently alluding to that of treason. Other subjects were mentioned, and during the conversation he sent for and introduced his little boy. His conduct throughout was dignified, and eminently self-possessed. He spoke with great precision, and with more than an ordinary degree of suavity, but, withal, producing upon me the impression that he was acting, and not
Tuskegee (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
to the eastward by the way of Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon; while a detached brigade, under Croxton, moved rapidly in the same direction, by a more northern route, through Jasper, Talladega, and La Grange. The limits of this sketch forbid a detailed narrative of how these gallant troopers captured the last stronghold of the Confederacy, pausing in their march to raise the National flag over the first rebel capitol; how the astonished rebel ladies at the beautiful village of Tuskegee bedecked their horses with flowers as a reward for perfect discipline and good behavior; how they spared one printing press, claimed by a strong-mined woman, upon the condition that she and her descendants, unto the fourth generation, should permit nothing but Bibles, Testaments, and school books to be printed upon it, and destroyed another, which had fled from them already through four States; or how two of Iowa's most gallant soldiers, Winslow and Noble, led by the intrepid General Upton,
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
tement rests upon newspaper report, which I have not time to verify. As a matter of course, the starving rebel soldiers suffered, but Davis succeeded in reaching Danville in safety, where he rapidly recovered from the fright he had sustained, and astonished his followers by a proclamation as bombastic and empty as his fortunes wer, and with the intention, as we have already said, of making their way to the Florida coast, and embarking there for a foreign land. The President had clung, at Danville, to the hope that Lee might effect a retreat to Southwestern Virginia, and he had remained there long enough to see that hope disappointed. Again, when he had srebel suppressions, it was supposed the Army of the Potomac had gained a decisive victory. It was stated that Davis and the rebel government had already gone to Danville, but that their cause was not yet lost. On the 14th and 15th information was received confirmatory of Lee's defeat, and the evacuation of Richmond. It was also
Dublin, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
er, with orders to march eastward, by the way of Jeffersonville, to Dublin, on the Oconee river, with the greatest possible speed, scouting thed rapidly during the whole night, by way of Jeffersonville, toward Dublin, on the Oconee river. At Jeffersonville, Colonel Harnden left oneall command, he continued the march till the next evening, reaching Dublin at about seven o'clock. During the night and day he had sent out scil after he had bivouacked for the night. The white inhabitants of Dublin expressed entire ignorance and indifference in regard to the movemeelling him that Davis, with his wife and family, had passed through Dublin that day, going south, on the river road. The negro reported that icited, after detailing Lieutenant Lane and sixty men to remain at Dublin, and to scout the country in all directions, particularly toward thegan the pursuit of the party just mentioned. Five miles south of Dublin, he obtained information, from a woman of the country, living in a
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
tern and Southwestern Georgia. Detachments of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry occupied Cuthbert, Eufaula, Columbus and Bainbridge, and kept a vigilant watch over the lower Flint and Chattahoochee, while General McCook, with a detachment of his division at Albany, and seven hundred men between there and Tallahassee, Florida, was scouting the country to the north and eastward. We also had rail and telegraphic communication from my headquarters at Macon with Atlanta, Augusta, West Point, Milledgeville, Albany and Eufaula, and, finally, Palmer, in hot haste, was approaching the line of the Savannah from South Carolina with one brigade. By inspecting the map for a moment it will be seen that our troops, amounting to fifteen thousand horsemen, were occupying a well defined and almost continuous line from Kingston, Georgia, to Tallahassee, Florida, with detachments and scouts well out in all directions to the front and rear. With vigilance on the part of the troops, it is difficult to p
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
ida, was scouting the country to the north and eastward. We also had rail and telegraphic communication from my headquarters at Macon with Atlanta, Augusta, West Point, Milledgeville, Albany and Eufaula, and, finally, Palmer, in hot haste, was approaching the line of the Savannah from South Carolina with one brigade. By inspecting the map for a moment it will be seen that our troops, amounting to fifteen thousand horsemen, were occupying a well defined and almost continuous line from Kingston, Georgia, to Tallahassee, Florida, with detachments and scouts well out in all directions to the front and rear. With vigilance on the part of the troops, it is difficult to perceive how Davis and his party could possibly have hoped to escape. From the time they were reported at Charlotte till their capture, we were kept informed of their general movements, and were enabled thereby to dispose of our forces in such a manner as to render the capture morally certain. Rumors came in from all dir
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