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in service. His appointment, therefore, gave general satisfaction. His staff was composed chiefly of experienced officers-Colonel Carter Stevenson, Adjutant General; Major A. L. Long, Chief of Artillery; Captain Corley, Chief Quartermaster; Captain Cole, Chief Commissary; Lieutenant Matthews, Aide-de-camp, and Colonel Starks, volunteer Aide-de-camp; and, as the country was full of enthusiasm on account of the recent victory at Manassas, he was about to enter upon his new field of operations u Huntersville line amounted in round numbers to eight thousand five hundred effective men. The General's staff were particularly active in their efforts to prepare for a speedy advance. Colonel Stevenson, Adjutant General, and Captains Corley and Cole, Chief Quartermaster and Commissary, being experienced officers, rendered valuable service in organizing the troops and in collecting transportation and supplies. Major A. L. Long, in addition to his duties as Chief of Artillery, had assigned him
lle, by which Cheat Mountain might be turned. he sent Colonel Gilliam, with his own Virginia Regiment and Colonel Lee's Sixtndezvous at Huntersville, and advance by the Pass that Colonel Gilliam had been directed to occupy, to the rear of the enemy'ry, and Marye's and Stanley's batteries of artillery. Colonel Gilliam was at Valley Mountain Pass, fifteen miles west of Hucupation of Valley Mountain by a force as large as that of Gilliam could escape the observation of the Federals, and its posithe time of his probable advance, he proceeded to join Colonel Gilliam at Valley Mountain. He took with him Major Lee's cavaconnoitering. It had now been eight or ten days since Colonel Gilliam first arrived at Valley Mountain Pass. At that time hand patient endurance in this campaign; and Colonels Burk, Gilliam, Campbell, Lee, Munford, Maney, Hatten and Savage were worquarter himself. He, therefore, directed Loring to detach Gilliam with his own regiment (the battalion of State Regulars) an
Sunday McDowell (search for this): chapter 7
nd he was at once recognized as the officer whose disappearance at Rich Mountain had led to so much inquiry. He was sent a prisoner of war to the Federal headquarters, where he was courteously received. The defeat of General Garnett left McClellan in undisputed possession of all Northwestern Virginia. In order to secure his acquisition he strongly occupied some of the principal mountain passes, and took other measures for its permanent occupation. A few days later the total defeat of McDowell at Bull Run considerably changed the order of things. McClellan was called to take the command of the Army of the Potomac, and the greater part of his forces was withdrawn, leaving only a few thousand men to hold Northwestern Virginia. The result of McClellan's success in that quarter proved to be of much greater importance than was at first apprehended, by disheartening its loyal inhabitants and encouraging the doubtful or indifferent to give their adhesion to the Federal Government. Th
Thomas Jonathan Jackson (search for this): chapter 7
ad been shown by the recent operations in that quarter), that the Confederate authorities abandoned the idea of its further occupation. Therefore, the greater part of the troops that had been serving in Western Virginia were ordered where their services would be more available, and General Lee was assigned to the command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. While the operations on Big Sewell were in progress, General Reynolds made a descent from Cheat Mountain and attacked the Confederate position on the Greenbrier. This attack was promptly met by General H. R. Jackson, and repulsed with considerable loss. Soon after his return to Huntersville, General Loring was instructed to report to General T. J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), then commanding in the Shenandoah Valley, to participate in a contemplated winter campaign. About the same time I received orders from the War Office to report to General Lee in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
Edward Johnston (search for this): chapter 7
e found Jackson, who informed him that on arriving at the Greenbrier river he had found Cheat Mountain Pass so strongly occupied by Federals that he deemed it inadvisable to attempt to carry it by a direct attack. So he retired, leaving Colonel Edward Johnston, with the Twelfth Georgia Regiment and Anderson's Battery to occupy the Alleghany Mountain Pass, and posting Rust's Arkansas Regiment and Baldwin's Virginia Regiment in convenient supporting distance of Johnston, established himself at MJohnston, established himself at Monterey, with Fulkerson's and Scott's Virginia Regiments, the First Georgia Regiment (Colonel Ramsey's), Major Jackson's Cavalry, and Shoemaker's Battery. Having heard of a Pass about forty miles west, near Huntersville, by which Cheat Mountain might be turned. he sent Colonel Gilliam, with his own Virginia Regiment and Colonel Lee's Sixth North Carolina Regiment, being a force of about two thousand men, to occupy this Pass, and had ordered the remaining troops intended for the Army of Northwe
ess to co-operate when the advance was made from Huntersville, and then proceeded to that place to make arrangements for the proposed movement. When General Loring arrived at Huntersville, about the 1st of August, he found already there Maney's, Hatten's, and Savage's Tennessee Regiments, Campbell's Virginia Regiment, a battalion of Virginia regulars, four hundred strong, commanded by Colonel Munford, Major W. H. F. Lee's squadron of cavalry, and Marye's and Stanley's batteries of artillery. Cis soldierly qualities and high gentlemanly bearing, gained the esteem of all. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the troops for their courage and patient endurance in this campaign; and Colonels Burk, Gilliam, Campbell, Lee, Munford, Maney, Hatten and Savage were worthy of the gallant fellows that it had fallen to their lot to command. We will now examine into the condition of affairs on the line of the Kanawha. General Floyd entered the Kanawha Valley in August. General Cox was then
Lewis Randolph (search for this): chapter 7
ind a practicable route leading to the rear of Cheat Mountain Pass, the route by which General Loring proposed to reach it being now effectually closed. The possession of the Pass was of great importance to the Confederates, as the Parkersburg turnpike was the principal line over which operations could be successfully carried on in Northwestern Virginia. Individual scouts were employed, both from among the well-affected inhabitants and the enterprising young soldiers of the army; Lieutenant Lewis Randolph, of the Virginia State Regulars, was particularly distinguished for the boldness of his reconnoissances. About the 25th of September, General Jackson reported to General Loring that Colonel Rust had made a reconnoissance to the rear of Cheat Mountain Pass, and had discovered a route, though difficult, by which infantry could be led. Soon after, Colonel Rust reported in person and informed General Lee of the practicability of reaching the rear of the enemy's position on Cheat Mount
manded by Colonel Munford, Major W. H. F. Lee's squadron of cavalry, and Marye's and Stanley's batteries of artillery. Colonel Gilliam was at Valley Mountain Pass, fifteen miles west of Huntersville, with two regiments, and two other regiments. Burk's Virginia and Colonel —‘s Georgia Regiment were en route from Staunton. The force of Loring on the Huntersville line amounted in round numbers to eight thousand five hundred effective men. The General's staff were particularly active in their efll into an ambuscade, and was killed. He had, by his soldierly qualities and high gentlemanly bearing, gained the esteem of all. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the troops for their courage and patient endurance in this campaign; and Colonels Burk, Gilliam, Campbell, Lee, Munford, Maney, Hatten and Savage were worthy of the gallant fellows that it had fallen to their lot to command. We will now examine into the condition of affairs on the line of the Kanawha. General Floyd entered
Carter Stevenson (search for this): chapter 7
l years prior to his resignation had commanded the Department of New Mexico, where he acquired an experience in mountain service. His appointment, therefore, gave general satisfaction. His staff was composed chiefly of experienced officers-Colonel Carter Stevenson, Adjutant General; Major A. L. Long, Chief of Artillery; Captain Corley, Chief Quartermaster; Captain Cole, Chief Commissary; Lieutenant Matthews, Aide-de-camp, and Colonel Starks, volunteer Aide-de-camp; and, as the country was fure en route from Staunton. The force of Loring on the Huntersville line amounted in round numbers to eight thousand five hundred effective men. The General's staff were particularly active in their efforts to prepare for a speedy advance. Colonel Stevenson, Adjutant General, and Captains Corley and Cole, Chief Quartermaster and Commissary, being experienced officers, rendered valuable service in organizing the troops and in collecting transportation and supplies. Major A. L. Long, in additio
come colonel of a regiment of mounted rifles, and for several years prior to his resignation had commanded the Department of New Mexico, where he acquired an experience in mountain service. His appointment, therefore, gave general satisfaction. His staff was composed chiefly of experienced officers-Colonel Carter Stevenson, Adjutant General; Major A. L. Long, Chief of Artillery; Captain Corley, Chief Quartermaster; Captain Cole, Chief Commissary; Lieutenant Matthews, Aide-de-camp, and Colonel Starks, volunteer Aide-de-camp; and, as the country was full of enthusiasm on account of the recent victory at Manassas, he was about to enter upon his new field of operations under the most favorable auspices. General Loring, accompanied by his staff, left Richmond on the 22d of July, the day after the battle and victory of Manassas. On the 24th he arrived at Monterey, a small village about sixty miles west of Staunton; there he found Jackson, who informed him that on arriving at the Gre
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