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Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
upation. Therefore, the greater part of the troops that had been serving in Western Virginia were ordered where their services would be more available, and General Lee was assigned to the command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. While the operations on Big Sewell were in progress, General Reynolds made a descent from Cheat Mountain and attacked the Confederate position on the Greenbrier. This attack was promptly met by General H. R. Jackson, and repulsed with consided the Confederate position on the Greenbrier. This attack was promptly met by General H. R. Jackson, and repulsed with considerable loss. Soon after his return to Huntersville, General Loring was instructed to report to General T. J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), then commanding in the Shenandoah Valley, to participate in a contemplated winter campaign. About the same time I received orders from the War Office to report to General Lee in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
further occupation. Therefore, the greater part of the troops that had been serving in Western Virginia were ordered where their services would be more available, and General Lee was assigned to the command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. While the operations on Big Sewell were in progress, General Reynolds made a descent from Cheat Mountain and attacked the Confederate position on the Greenbrier. This attack was promptly met by General H. R. Jackson, and repulsed d the Confederate position on the Greenbrier. This attack was promptly met by General H. R. Jackson, and repulsed with considerable loss. Soon after his return to Huntersville, General Loring was instructed to report to General T. J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), then commanding in the Shenandoah Valley, to participate in a contemplated winter campaign. About the same time I received orders from the War Office to report to General Lee in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
Monterey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
is staff, left Richmond on the 22d of July, the day after the battle and victory of Manassas. On the 24th he arrived at Monterey, a small village about sixty miles west of Staunton; there he found Jackson, who informed him that on arriving at the G Arkansas Regiment and Baldwin's Virginia Regiment in convenient supporting distance of Johnston, established himself at Monterey, with Fulkerson's and Scott's Virginia Regiments, the First Georgia Regiment (Colonel Ramsey's), Major Jackson's Cavalryginia to proceed direct from Staunton to Huntersville. This was the condition of affairs when General Loring arrived at Monterey and assumed command. He remained several days in the neighborhood of Monterey, examining the condition of the troops anMonterey, examining the condition of the troops and reconnoitering the position of the enemy on Cheat Mountain. Cheat Mountain Pass is a narrow gap near the top of the mountain, whose natural strength had been greatly increased by the art of engineers since its occupation by the Federals. It was ap
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
fore proceeding with the operations in Northwestern Virginia, it will be necessary to glance at thearried on within its limits. This section of Virginia did not cordially coincide in the ordinance oeneral McClellan crossed the Ohio into Northwestern Virginia, with the view of gaining the adherencderate forces, which had again entered Northwestern Virginia; but to do so it was necessary to passeaving only a few thousand men to hold Northwestern Virginia. The result of McClellan's success in Campbell's Virginia Regiment, a battalion of Virginia regulars, four hundred strong, commanded by Cd to the command of the Department of Western Virginia. At the same time a large portion of the trot to the command of the Department of Western Virginia. Although aware of the difficulties to be me He brought them with him to the mountains of Virginia. There was not a day when it was possible fons could be successfully carried on in Northwestern Virginia. Individual scouts were employed, bot[2 more...]
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 7
about the 12th of August, the Federals had been reinforced, and this position had been so greatly strengthened that General Lee deemed it unadvisable to attempt a direct attack, so the only course now to be pursued was to gain the Federal flank or rear, and strike them when they least expected an attack. General Lee had been distinguished in the Mexican war as a reconnoitering officer, and General Scott had been mainly indebted to his bold reconnoissance for the brilliant success of his Mexican campaigns. Rank and age had not impaired the qualities that had formerly rendered him so distinguished. He brought them with him to the mountains of Virginia. There was not a day when it was possible for him to be out, that the General, with either Colonel Washington or Captain Taylor, might not be seen crossing the mountains, climbing over rocks and crags, to get a view of the Federal position. Ever mindful of the safety of his men, he would never spare himself toil or fatigue when see
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ederate authorities, being aware of the importance of Western Virginia at that time, both in a political and military point R. Jackson, on the Parkersburg turnpike, to re-enter Western Virginia, and to occupy some convenient position until the remld be to the Confederates in their attempt to re-occupy West Virginia, seized it and fortified it, and now held it with a forfor the defense of the capital. The Federal force in Western Virginia, at the time General Loring assumed command of the Ar of the difficulties to be met with in a country like Western Virginia, whose mountains, and more than half of whose inhabitat it was impossible to continue active operations in Western Virginia. Snow had already fallen, and the roads had become ate commanders. The difficulties to be encountered in Western Virginia were so great, and the chances of success so doubtfule greater part of the troops that had been serving in Western Virginia were ordered where their services would be more avail
Greenbrier (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
s. On the 24th he arrived at Monterey, a small village about sixty miles west of Staunton; there he found Jackson, who informed him that on arriving at the Greenbrier river he had found Cheat Mountain Pass so strongly occupied by Federals that he deemed it inadvisable to attempt to carry it by a direct attack. So he retired, lenemy's position on Cheat Mountain. He therefore directed General Jackson to advance his whole force, which at this time amounted to six thousand men, to the Greenbrier river and hold himself in readiness to co-operate when the advance was made from Huntersville, and then proceeded to that place to make arrangements for the propospike, gradually pushing back Floyd and Wise in the direction of Lewisburg, it being his intention to turn the Confederate position on Valley Mountain and the Greenbrier river. Such was the condition of affairs on the line of the Kanawha at the close of the Valley Mountain campaign. General Lee, perceiving that the operations on
Laurel Hill, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rfield was sent with a few companies to operate on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad; but this force was too small, and illy provided with the essentials for service, so that it could effect nothing. Shortly afterward, General Robert Garnett was sent by the Confederate authorities to seize the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and to confirm the Northwestern Virginians in their allegiance to the State. Garnett, with a force of about five thousand men, reached the railroad in June, and occupied Laurel Hill. About the same time, General McClellan crossed the Ohio into Northwestern Virginia, with the view of gaining the adherence of its inhabitants to the Federal Government, and to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Having a greatly superior force, he made it his first object to attack Garnett before that general could be reinforced (Colonel Pegram, with a considerable detachment, being defeated by General Rosecrans, with a part of McClellan's force), and was obliged to retreat, in o
Cheat Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t forty miles west, near Huntersville, by which Cheat Mountain might be turned. he sent Colonel Gilliam, withand reconnoitering the position of the enemy on Cheat Mountain. Cheat Mountain Pass is a narrow gap near the t occupy, to the rear of the enemy's position on Cheat Mountain. He therefore directed General Jackson to adva the command of General Reynolds, occupying the Cheat Mountain Pass. The other portion, commanded by General of reaching the rear of the enemy's position on Cheat Mountain, from which a favorable attack could be made, a, discovered, leading along the western side of Cheat Mountain, by which troops could be conducted to a point en thousand men; of these, two thousand were on Cheat Mountain, about five thousand in position on the Lewisbulties to be overcome. Colonel Rust's attack on Cheat Mountain was to be the signal for the general advance of progress, General Reynolds made a descent from Cheat Mountain and attacked the Confederate position on the Gr
Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
re relate an adventure of De Lagrel, connected with Garnett's defeat, which exhibited great courage, endurance and address. De Lagrel was an old army officer, and commanded the artillery of Pegram's detachment. When attacked by Rosecrans at Rich Mountain, he fought his guns with great gallantry and effect. His men behaved well until the enemy began to close in upon them; they then fled, leaving De Lagrel almost alone. Undaunted by the desertion of his men, he served a gun himself until disa and, with all his ingenuity, he could not escape detection; his boots had betrayed him. These traitors were drawn off, and in the leg of one the name of De Lagrel was found, and he was at once recognized as the officer whose disappearance at Rich Mountain had led to so much inquiry. He was sent a prisoner of war to the Federal headquarters, where he was courteously received. The defeat of General Garnett left McClellan in undisputed possession of all Northwestern Virginia. In order to se
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